Tuesday, July 31, 2007

Philip Bayne

Philip Bayne, also known as “Bane”, “Bain”, “Baine”, “Pane” or “Payne”, was born April 15, 1841, in Norfolk, England, the son of Robert (b. 1814) and Elizabeth (Cooper, b. 1819).

Sometime between 1852 and 1854 Philip’s family immigrated to the United States eventually settling in New York State. By 1860 Robert had settled his family on a farm in Ridgway, Orleans County, New York. Philip eventually moved west and settled in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

Philip was 17 or 19 years old, probably unable to read or write, and apparently living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Although Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County, Philip claimed that he was living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted.) According to Philip, he was taken sick with fever at Fort Lyon, Virginia, sometime in the fall of 1861. In any case he eventually returned to duty with the regiment and by July of 1862, was reported as a company cook. He also suffered, like so many others from chronic diarrhea. According to tentmate John Foulks, he recalled Philip “jumping out of bed at night and running out and said he was troubled with chronic diarrhea.”

By August, however, Philip was listed as absent sick in the hospital. He eventually returned to duty and, according to a statement he made in 1890, on May 1, 1863, during the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia (which actually commenced on May 3) he was struck in the left shoulder by a six-pound solid shot and bruised but not disabled. Hospital steward Henry Booth reported years afterward that “the flesh was not cut but the should was badly bruised.”

Henry Booth also reported that sometime in July of 1862 while the regiment was at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia,

just after the 7 days fight before Richmond Bayne was lame and complained of rheumatism in the hip. It seemed to me in the left hip. I was then in the [Regimental] hospital and by direction of the Surg[eon] I applied some three or four blisters to Bayne’s hip. As soon as the skin smoothed up another blister was put on – one followed the other as fast as the condition permitted – some two or three or four blisters were applied but I don’t recall just what length of time it took. It is barely possible only two blisters were applied but I should think as many as three anyway.

Henry was asked is he was “absolutely positive that the blisters applied . . . were for rheumatism.”

“No,” he answered,

I do not know that he had rheumatism. I remember he came to sick call complaining of this lameness he was examined in my presence by Surg. W. B. Morrisonc [and that] Dr, Morrison doubted Bayne was lame and he ordered me to apply the blisters. After 2 or 3 had been applied and he was still lame Dr. Morrison said he might have the rheumatism. Bayne said the blisters were worse than the rheumatism and there the matter dropped. Bayne was quite a hand to complain of lameness especially if there was a fight or any other hard duty on hard.

On the other hand, bunkmate Clark Tuttle described a somewhat different person altogether.

Clark had no recollection of Philip being sick or lame or having a blister applied:

[A]fter marching all day I would be so tired I would be ready to drop and he would tell me to sit down which I would do and he would get wood and water and I would then go on and get supper. He was a little Englishman and as tough a man as I ever saw. He was not the kind of man that would play off sick or lame to escape a battle or hard duty.

Interestingly the examiner for the pension bureau described Bayne in 1903 as “densely ignorant and of obtuse perceptive faculties.”

In February of 1864 was apparently on detached duty “taking care of public animals”, that is guarding either horses, mules or cattle. Philip was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

It is not known if Philip returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army, and in fact returned to his family home near Ridgeway, Orleans County, New York, in the spring of 1865.

Philip was residing in Ridgway, Orleans County, New York, when he married Thursey (probably Thursday) Felstead (1850-1927) on September 10, 1866, in Johnson Creek, Niagara County, New York. They had at least four children: Frederick (1867-1889), Rosetta E. (b. 1872), and twin boys Willis and William F. (b. 1879)

Philip was probably still living in Orleans County, New York in 1872, and by 1880 was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Gaines, Orleans County. In fact according to Thomas Shorter, a good friend and neighbor, Philip lived in Orleans for some seventeen years after he left the army. Shorter testified that he and Philip moved out west in March of 1886 and settled in Custer County, South Dakota.

Inded, by 1890 and 1891 Philip was living in Buffalo Gap, Custer County, South Dakota. That same year he was attempting to locate at least two former members of Company D who were then reported to be living in Michigan, presumably to solicit pension affidavits.

In 1891 Philip applied for and received pension no. 737,245.

By 1898 Philip was back in Michigan and residing in Hastings, Barry County when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. He may have been living in Hastings between 1906 and 1911.

Philip was residing at R.D. no. 5, in Hastings when he died of a cerebral hemorrhage on June 14, 1917. He was buried in Fuller cemetery, Carlton, Barry County.

His widow applied for and received pension no. 830,729, drawing $12 per month by 1917 when she was living in Hastings.

Monday, July 30, 2007

Charles W. Baxter

Charles W. Baxter was born 1836 in Olcott, Newfane Township, Niagara County, New York, probably the son of Isaac (b. 1810) and Mariah (b. 1815).

New York natives Isaac and Mariah were married, presumably in New York where they lived for many years. By 1850 Charles was attending school with his three younger siblings and living with his family in Newfane, Niagara County, where his father worked as a blacksmith.

Sometime before the war broke out Charles left New York and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan, probably in Ionia County. (In 1860 there at least two Baxter families living in Ionia county, Michigan: a wealthy farmer named Daniel Baxter, born about 1812 in New York, living with his wife and children in Ronald, Iand Hiram Baxter, born about 1813 in New York, living with his wife and children on a farm in Ionia.)

Charles stood 5’7” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 25 years old and working as a carpenter possibly living in Kent or Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) He was reported sick in his quarters in October of 1861 and was soon afterwards discharged for asthma, a condition he allegedly had previous to enlistment, on November 11, 1861, at Fort Lyon, Virginia.

Although he listed St. Johns, Clinton County, Michigan, as his mailing address on his discharge papers, it is not known for certain if Charles returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army. He reentered the service as a Private in Company E, One hundred eighty-eighth Ohio infantry, on January 24, 1865. Shortly afterwards he was promoted to Second Lieutenant. (It is unknown what the original connection was to Ohio.)

Charles was admitted to the Cumberland general Hospital, in Nashville, Tennessee, on August 16, 1865, suffering from fever, and he reportedly remained hospitalized until mid-December. Nevertheless, he was reported as mustered out with his company on September 21, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee. (In fact, he was probably still in the hospital when his regiment was officially released from federal service.)

Charles probably returned to Ohio after the war, and served as a petty officer -- more specifically as carpenter and quartermaster -- on the revenue cutter Sherman, out of Cleveland, Ohio, from April 1, 1866, until May 1, 1871.

By 1872 Charles was reportedly working in the coal business in Port Huron, Michigan.

At some point Charles settled in Cook County, Illinois, where he was possibly living as early as 1880 but certainly between 1886 and 1892. He was living at the City Hotel, corner of 16th & State Streets in Chicago, Illinois in July of 1890 when he applied for a pension (no. 691267, drawing $12.00 per month by 1901). By 1894 he had returned to New York and was living in Fairville, Wayne County.

Charles may have been living in the Buffalo, New York area when he died on August 21, 1901, and if so is presumably buried there.

Sunday, July 29, 2007

Martin Bates

Martin Bates was born on September 2, 1846, in Michigan, the son of James C. (1820-1909) and Diantha (b. 1822).

New York natives James and Diantha were married and settled in Michigan by 1844 when their son Perry was born. By 1850 Martin was living with his family and several siblings on a farm in Rome, Lenawee County. By 1860 Martin was attending school with his older brother Perry and younger sister Caroline and living on a large farm with his parents in Rome, Lenawee County (his father owned some $2800 worth of real estate).

Martin stood 5’6” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion, and was 17 years old and probably living with his family in Rome, Lenawee County, Michigan when he enlisted in Unassigned on March 10, 1864, at Rome for 3 years, crediting Rome. He was mustered the following day, on March 11 at Detroit. (His brother Perry had joined the Eighteenth Michigan infantry in 1862.)

There is no further record.

In fact, Martin probably never joined the Third Regiment, in fact there is no military service record found for Martin in the Third Michigan regiomental records at the National Archives.

It appears that he enlisted instead in Company E, Third Michigan cavalry at Adrian, Lenawee County on March 10 for 3 years, and was mustered on March 11. If this is in fact the same Martin Bates then he joined the Regiment at Lake Bluff, Arkansas on June 22, 1864. The regiment eventually moved to Carrollton, Louisiana in March of 1865 and participated in the siege of Mobile, Alabama during March and April. It then moved to occupy Mobile and was subsequently transferred to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and to Shreveport in early June. The regiment marched form Shreveport to San Antonio, Texas, from July 10-August 2 and went into garrison duty at San Antonio.

Martin died of dysentery and fever in the division hospital at San Antonio on September 15, 1865, and was buried in the “city cemetery” at San Antonio: grave no. 15.

In 1870 his parents were still living on a farm in Rome, Lenawee County; next door lived Perry and his family. By 1880 both James and Perry had moved their families to farms in Springport, Jackson County. In 1890 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 381,054); and in 1895 his father also applied for and received a pension (no. 441148), drawing $12.00 per month by 1909.

Saturday, July 28, 2007

Alfred G. and Benjamin Franklin Bates

Alfred G. Bates was born January 24, 1837, in Bath, Steuben County, New York, the son of Nathan (b. 1796-1850s) and Charity (Temple, b, 1802).

Vermonter Nathan and New York native Charity were married, probably in New York sometime before 1833 and resided in New York for some years. By 1840 Nathan was probably living in Wayne, Steuben County, New York, and by1850 Alfred was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Wayne, Steuben County, New York where his father worked as a carpenter. In 1853, when he was 16 years old, Alfred and his family left New York and headed west, eventually settling in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan.

Sometime after the family moved to Michigan Nathan died in Michigan and by 1860 Alfred was working as a farm laborer and residing with his mother Charity and family in Grand Rapids Township. (The family included his older brother Benjamin who would also enlist in the Old Third and a younger sister Emily who would marry another member of the Old Third, James V. Smith, in 1864. It is likely that they had another sister or perhaps a cousin named Harriet Ann, also born in Steuben County, New York, and who would marry Abram Darling who would also serve in Company A, Third Michigan.)

Alfred stood 5’8” with hazel eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 24 years old and probably still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. (Company A was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, specifically the Valley City Guards, or VCG, under the command of Captain Samuel Judd, who would also command Company A.) In 1862 he was joined by his brother Benjamin.

Alfred was reported as a hospital nurse in the regimental hospital from at least the end of 1861 through 1862, and from December of 1862 until late May of 1863 he served as a nurse in both Division hospital. (Alfred was being treated for conjunctivitis in late September.) He apparently rejoined the Regiment sometime before October and on November 30, 1863, Alfred was captured at Mine Run, Virginia, and confined at Richmond on December 30. He was then sent to Andersonville prison in Georgia on either February 24 or March 18, 1864, and was admitted to the prison hospital for scorbutus (scurvy) on July 13 and returned to the prison population on September 3.

James McElroy in his memoir This was Andersonville wrote that Alfred, called “Pete” by McElroy, once remarked to him on the physical characteristics of one of their squad whose eyes didn’t sit quite right. “Pete [Alfred] Bates of the 3d Michigan, who was the wag of our squad , accounted for Smith’s condition by saying that once, while on dress parade, the colonel of Smith’s Regiment had commanded ‘eyes right’, and then forgot to give the order ‘front’.”

Once a gang of thugs roaming the prison and stealing at will from those men who were sick and helpless, took a watch from one of the men in Bates’ squad. According to McElroy, Bates, who he reported was the Sergeant of their prison squad, “had considerable confidence in his muscular ability. He flamed up into mighty wrath and swore a sulfurous oath that we would get that watch back, whereupon about two hundred of us avowed our willingness to help reclaim it.” Which they did.

Some years after the war Bates told a newspaper reporter for the Grand Rapids Eagle that he had remained at Andersonville

till the rebels scattered the prisoners, for fear that Sherman would release them in his “March to the Sea”. In November, he was taken to Savannah, and afterward to Millen, where he was paroled, and was exchanged at Tybee island. All but two, he thinks, of the ten members of the Old Third who were taken with him, died in the prisons. He says that nothing that has been printed, or can be printed, overstates the horrors of those prison pens or the barbarities practiced upon them by their vindictive and unfeeling captors. . . . One-third of the Andersonville veterans died at the post, while the rest were so worn by disease and savage treatment that he thinks the majority have ‘passed up’ to join their comrades ‘on the other shore’ -- ‘got their final papers’, is the way Mr. Bates expresses it. One of those ten, Peter Myers, he thinks, lives near Sparta Center. He does not remember all their names. Among them he mentions, as he recollects them, Francis Brinnick, Jack Spencer, -- Biblee [Bippley] -- Greenhault or Greenwalt, Charles Soules and Willard Olds.”

Alfred was paroled on November 11 or 19 at Savannah, Georgia, and reported to Camp Parole (College Green Barracks), Maryland, on November 25. He was admitted to Division hospital no. 1 at Annapolis, Maryland, on November 25, and sent to Baltimore on November 27. He was eventually sent to Washington, DC, and admitted to Douglas hospital where he was finally discharged for chronic diarrhea on January 28, 1865.

He listed Grand Rapids on as his address on his discharge paper and indeed following his discharge he returned to Grand Rapids. In early February of 1865 the Eagle wrote,

We are pleased at any time to meet and shake by the hand, any man who is now or has been in the ranks of the Union army, a loyal and glorious defender of the Old Flag. Yesterday, Alfred G. bates, who went out a member of the lamented Capt. [Samuel] Judd’s company [A], in the glorious Old Third, and who has just returned, or the first time since he left here in 1861, made us a call. From November, 1863, to November, 1864, Mr. Bates was a prisoner among the rebels, having been taken at Miner’s [sic] Run. His account of the treatment of Union soldiers in rebel prisons, is corroborative of most all other reports, which are too shocking to repeat, or believe, if we were not compelled to, by a multitude of witnesses. Thank God, that the race of fiends in human shape is nearly ruin.

After his return to Michigan, Alfred settled in Middleville, Barry County and married New York native Mary Jordan (1838-1938) on February 22, 1866 in Middleville; they had at least three children, Milton (b. 1871), Myron (b. 1874) and James (also known as “Jay”, b. 1879); they may have had three more as well. Alfred and his family eventually returned to Kent County and was living in Harris Creek, Bowne Township in 1870 where he worked as a miller. He was probably still living in Bowne in 1876, but by 1880 was living in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward where he worked as a teamster.

By 1883 (or possibly 1885), Alfred had settled in Monroe County, where he lived variously at Federman and Lulu. In any case, he probably resided in Monroe County for the rest of his life. (Benjamin Bates too settled in Monroe County after the war.) Alfred was living in Lulu in 1888, 1890 and 1894 and served for some years as a Justice of the Peace in Lulu.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and Grand Army of the Republic Joseph Smith Post No. 76 in Monroe. In 1865 he applied for and received pension no. 45,454.

Alfred died of heart disease on December 1, 1906, in Lulu and his funeral service was conducted by Rev. Warfield, who took his text from 1 Corinthians 15:38: “But God gives it a body as he has chosen, and to each kind of seed its own body.” Alfred was buried in the Lulu cemetery (as was Benjamin Bates). (See photo G-671.)

His widow received a pension (no. 621,886).

Benjamin Franklin Bates was born October 30 or November 17, 1835, in Wayne, Steuben County, New York, the son of Nathan (b. 1796-1850s) and Charity (Temple, b, 1802).

Vermonter Nathan and New York native Charity were married, probably in New York sometime before 1833 and resided in New York for some years. By 1850 Benjamin (listed as just “Franklin”) was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Wayne, Steuben County, New York where his father worked as a carpenter. Sometime after the family moved to Michigan Nathan died in Michigan and by 1860 Benjamin was working as a laborer and living in Grand Rapids Township along with his mother and family (which included his younger brother Alfred. (Alfred would also join the Old Third Michigan, and a younger sister Emily, would marry another member of the Old Third, James V. Smith, in 1864. It is likely that they had another sister or perhaps a cousin named Harriet Ann, also born in Steuben County, New York, and who would marry Abram Darling who would also serve in Company A, Third Michigan.)

Ben was 26 years old and stood 5’8” tall with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was working as a farmer living in the Grand Rapids area when he enlisted in Company A on September 1, 11 or 15 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years and was mustered on September 15; received $25.00 bounty and one month’s advance pay. (His brother Alfred had enlisted in Company A the previous year.)

While in transit to join the Regiment in Virginia Benjamin allegedly deserted in Washington, DC on October 14, , and was dropped on November 14 for failure to report to his unit. He finally joined the Regiment on December 12 at Camp Pitcher, but by February of 1863 was detached as a nurse in the Division hospital, a role he occupied through May of 1863.

Benjamin was admitted to Finley general hospital in Washington, DC, on October 23, 1863, diagnosed with syphilis, and was sick in the hospital in Washington, DC, through May of 1864, being furloughed three times during his hospitalization. He was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and although absent sick until he was discharged on May 3 or 31, 1865, near Washington, DC, he was promoted to Corporal on April 1, 1865. (He claimed in later years that he had been injured in the left arm and hip near Appomattox in April of 1865 and was subsequently treated in the regimental hospital.)

After the war Benjamin eventually returned to Michigan and by 1870 he was working as a a miller and living with the Arnold family in Grand Rapids Township, Kent County. (His brother Alfred was also a miller and working in Bowne, Kent County that same year.) was living in London, Monroe County in 1890 and in Summerfield, Monroe County in 1894. (Alfred too had settled in Monroe County.)

He was married twice, first to one Matilda who died very young and second to Elizabeth (or Eliza) Dowling (d. 1929), on New Year’s Day, 1872, in Brussels, Ontario, Canada. They had at least seven children: Mary (b. 1873), Mabel (b. 1878), Charlotte or Lottie (b. 1879), Alfred William (b. 1881), French (b. 1883), Blanche (b. 1886), and Harrison (b. 1888).



Benjamin worked as a miller for many years and both he and his wife Eliza were Protestants.

In 1888 he applied for and received a pension (cert. no. 929580) and was a member of Joseph Smith Grand Army of the Republic Post No. 76 in Monroe.

He died of cirrhosis of the liver at his home in Lulu, Monroe County on May 24, 1900, and funeral services were conducted by Rev. S. Cunningham of the Lulu U.B. Church. He was buried in Lulu cemetery (as was Alfred Bates). See photos P-233 and 234 and G-672.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 527854). Subsequently, a pension was file don behalf of at least one minor child and granted (no. 575932). His widow was living in Toledo, Ohio, at 816 Fernwood Street, in 1929 when she died, and her remains were sent to Michigan and she was buried alongside Benjamin.

Thursday, July 26, 2007

Henry Philos and Hiram Bateman - updated 7/17/11

Henry Philos Bateman was born January 19, 1843, in Canada, the son of Hiram (1812-1891) and Philena B. (Cook, 1817-1895).
Sometime before 1841 Hiram and his wife had settled in Canada where they probably lived until about 1843 when they may have lived briefly in Clinton County, New York. In any case, sometime between 1843 and 1848 they moved to Michigan, eventually settling in Ottawa County. By 1850 Henry was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Tallmadge, Ottawa County. In 1860 Henry was working as a farmer and living with his family in Tallmadge, where he was also probably attending school.
Henry stood 5’9” with black eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was 18 years old and probably still living in Tallmadge when he enlisted in Company B on November 6, 1861, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered on December 23 at Detroit. (His father Hiram had enlisted in June in Company I.) Henry was shot “through the deltoid muscle near his shoulder joint” probably on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and was hospitalized in Washington, DC, at one point in Armory Square Hospital, under the care of former Third Michigan Regimental Surgeon Dr. D. W. Bliss. According to Henry’s sister Harriet, their father, Hiram, although suffering himself from chronic dysentery contracted near Malvern Hill, Virginia, apparently went and took care of his son. Henry was eventually discharged on December 15, 1862, at Washington, DC, for immobility of his left arm caused by a gunshot to the shoulder.
After his discharge from the army Henry may have returned to Ottawa County, although he gave his mailing address on his discharge paper as Grand Rapids. In any case, Henry died on September 29, 1866, probably at his family’s in Ottawa County and was buried in Lamont cemetery, Ottawa County.
No pension seems to be available.
Hiram Bateman was born January 26, 1812, in Clinton County, New York.
Both of Hiram’s parents were born in New York and presumably married there. In 1810 there was one Simon Bateman living in Champlain, Clinton County, New York; he was reportedly in Champlain, New York in 1830 as well.
Hiram was probably living in New York when he married New York native Philena Betsey Cook (1817-1895) on June 26, 1838, at Belmont, Franklin County, New York, and they had at least seven children: Harriet Amelia (b. 1839), George Orcut (b.1841), Henry Philos or Phillip (b. 1843), Celia Matlilda (b. 1848), Clarissa (1851-1905), Laura (b. 1855) and Nellie (b. 1858).
In 1840 Simon and Simon Jr., were living in Champlain, New York; one Robert R. Bateman was residing in Mooers, Clinton County. Hiram and his wife may have been living in Rawdon (?), Quebec, between 1839 and 1841, but were probably residing in Champlain, Clinton County, New York by 1843. According to a statement he made in 1881, Hiram settled in Lamont, Ottawa County, Michigan around 1844, and certainly sometime before 1848 Hiram and his wife settled in Lamont, where they were still living in 1850. (In 1850 there was one Simon Bateman, age 44, probably Simon Jr., living in Champlain, Clinton County.) By 1860 Hiram was a farmer living with his wife in Lamont. He was well acquainted with Albert Babcock who was from Tallmadge, Ottawa County and who would join Company B.
According to a statement given after the war, Hiram’s oldest son George enlisted in the 3rd Michigan sometime in May of 1861, but injured himself with an axe and was consequently unable to muster in on either May 23 (state service) or June 10 (federal service), 1861. At George’s suggestion, Hiram “took his place in the company and also recruited fifteen men at my own expense that would muster on condition that I would, for three months’ service,” but that shortly afterwards in the wake of President Lincoln’s call for additional men, the Regiment voted to enlist for three years or during the war “and thus I went.”
Hiram stood 6’0” tall with blue eyes, auburn hair and a fair complexion and was 49 years old and still living in Tallmadge, Ottawa County when he enlisted on May 10, 1861, in Company I. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)
One source reported that by August of 1861 Hiram along with William Comstock were working in the regimental hospital tending the sick. “We understand,” wrote the Grand Haven News in mid-August, “that Mr. Bateman and Mr. Comstock, both from Lamont, are in the regiment’s hospital, on the camping ground, detailed from the company to aid in the care of the sick and wounded, so that our own acquaintances will receive and prepare for the sick such comforts as have been sent from this village.”
On October 28, 1861, Hiram, under the command of Captain Charles Lyon of the Third Michigan, was sent home to Michigan in order to recruit for the Regiment during the fall and winter of 1861. The first man Hiram recruited was his youngest son Henry, who enlisted in Company B. Hiram returned to the Regiment in Virginia sometime in February of 1862 and was subsequently reported in the regimental hospital. Indeed, according to Hiram he was “doing duty as nurse in [the regimental] hospital” throughout the winter and spring of 1862, and that he was in fact taking care of Albert Babcock of Company B, another Lamont, Ottawa County solider, who was suffering from typhoid fever.
Some years after the war Hiram claimed that just “before the Battle of Malvern Hill in 1862, while on the march, with Capt. [Abraham] Whitney of same Regiment and two other hospital attendants, and going from Savage Station to James River, following up the retreat of the army, in its flank movement to the river, he was injured on left side in the following manner, to wit: while jumping over a boggy place with poles (?), his companions doing the same, ‘Hiram’ slipped and fell, and struck on some chunks in the groin, . . . and was then so disabled that he could not go forward that day. . . .”
Captain Thomas Tate, who was commanding Company in July of 1862 when the Regiment was at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia, wrote that Bateman “had never been considered fit to do duty in the ranks” and that he had been to the hospital “most of the time since he was enlisted.” During the same time former Hospital Steward Walter Morrison, then acting assistant surgeon of the Regiment, examined Bateman and found him suffering from “general debility resulting from his advanced age.” Morrison recommended that Bateman be discharged and so he was on July 9 or 17, 1862, at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia, for “general debility”.
By the third week of July Hiram had returned to his family and home in Ottawa County.
By 1870 Hiram was living with his wife and three daughters in Lamont, Tallmadge Township, and working as a farmer.
In March of 1879 he received a pension (no. 157,744), for a hydrocele on the right side, drawing $2.00 per month in 1883.
In 1879 he was living in Lamont, and in Tallmadge with his wife in 1880 (a granddaughter was also living with them), and he was living in Lamont in 1885, 1888 and 1890. In fact, Hiram probably lived the remainder of his life in the Lamont area.
He became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in 1885, as well as Grand Army of the Republic Randall Post No. 238 in Coopersville.
Hiram died of chronic diarrhea in Lamont on October 11, 1891, and was buried in Lamont cemetery, next to his son Henry who had died during the war.
Hiram Bateman, one of the oldest and best known of the pioneer citizens of Ottawa County, died at his residence "Valley Farm," at 2:20 o’clock Sunday, p. m., the 11th inst.
He was taken sick Sunday evening, the 4th inst., with severe chills, which were followed by the fatal diarrhea, to which he was subject. From the first his illness assumed a dangerous type. He rallied Wednesday so that some hope was entertained by his physician and family that he might recover, and he expressed his own belief that he should, but all was vain. Thursday the alarming symptoms returned and he was soon beyond hope. Friday and Saturday he was unconscious most of the time and on Saturday at the hour named he passed quietly away, leaving the already small number of pioneer citizens of Ottawa County one less, and one being taken who will be sadly missed by his many friends and acquaintances, including army comrades who will all deeply sympathize with the bereaved widow and family circle.
The funeral of their comrade was conducted under the auspices of Randall Post, with much credit to the post and fulfilling a well-known wish of the deceased to be laid at rest by the "boys in blue’ under the old flag where he should receive his "final discharge and muster out."
The following mention of the deceased in the funeral remarks of Rev. O. H. Johnson many be of interest to many who have known Mr. Bateman.
"Hiram Bateman was born in Moore’s, Clinton County, New York, January 26, 1812, moved from New York to Grand Rapids in April 1844, and to Steel’s Landing, now known as Lamont, in December of the same year, where he has resided ever since. He entered the army in 1861 as a soldier of the late War of the Rebellion, serving until 1862, when discharged for a disability which has finally caused his death.
He became a professor of religion and a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church when a young man, learning his trade as tanner, in Cassville, New York, and was known as an earnest laborer in Sunday school work. His membership with this church was discontinued and one with the Congregational church in Lamont began in 1850, when he united with his wife and has been a member up to the time of his death. His hope and trust in the merits and love of Christ as his Savior were abiding until the end, for his last articulate sentence, two days before his death, was ‘Yes, leading, leading on.’ This was in answer to an inquiry if the Savior was leading him."
Shortly after Hiram’s death his widow went to live with one Mrs. John B. Allen, possibly a daughter, in Washington, DC. She received pension no. 327,477.

Monday, July 23, 2007

Dennis Bartholomew

Dennis Bartholomew was born 1844 in Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan, probably the son of Fidelia (b. 1817).

New York native Fidelia eventually settled with her husband in Jackson County, Michigan, possibly b y 1840, certainly by the time Dennis was born in 1844. (In 1840 there were three Bartholomews living in Jackson County: Jehiel, O. N. and Anza or Arza. By 1860 Arza was living in Crockery, Ottawa County with his family.) By 1850 the Bartholomew family had moved to Ottawa County, on the western side of the state, and Fidelia (or “Phidelia”) was living with Ebenzer (b. 1782) and Charlotte (b. 1782); nearby lived Arza Bartholomew and his family. By 1860 Dennis was a student living with his mother who was working as a domestic for one William Buck, a farmer in Crockery, Ottawa County; also living at the same residence were a farmer named Asa Bartholomew (b. 1834) and his wife Maine native Sarah (b. 1839).

Dennis stood about 5’7” with blue eyes brown hair and a light complexion and was 17 years old and probably still living in Ottawa County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

According to his discharge paper Dennis had been on the sick list since August of 1861, had been confined to his bed in November and apparently suffered from consumption since at least December of 1861. The War Department noted that he had in fact been absent sick in a hospital in Annapolis, Maryland, in September since August 21, and that he was present for duty in November and December of 1861.

In March and April of 1862 he was absent sick at a hospital in Alexandria, Virginia. and in July of 1862 he was reported absent sick in the hospital since April 18, 1862. He allegedly deserted from the hospital on August 18, but in fact he was discharged for consumption May 11, 1862 in Alexandria.

Following his discharge Dennis returned to western Michigan, settling back in Ottawa County where he worked as a laborer. (He may have returned to his Fidelia’s home in Nunica, Ottawa County.) By 1876 he was living in Grand Haven, Ottawa County, and, with the exception of occasional trips to Chicago, he resided in Ottawa County for about the first ten years or so after the war.

Dennis eventually settled in Chicago, probably in the vicinity of Hyde Park where he was residing when both John J. Bruce and William Mack testified -- date unknown – that they were intimately acquainted with Dennis and swore an affidavit describing his postwar ailments.

He married Frances A. Mack (d. 1900) on June 26, 1873, in Chicago, the day after her divorce from John Bruce had been granted (her former husband retained custody of their two children, however).

Dennis and “Fannie” lived in Chicago for some years. Dennis was admitted to St. Luke’s hospital in Chicago for hemorrhoids on February 3, 1878 and discharged on February 20. He and Fanny were probably residing in Hyde Park Township, Cook County in 1880. By 1881 they were living in Woodlawn Park, Chicago.

Dennis applied for a pension application no. 275767), but the certificate was apparently never granted since he died before it was completed.

Dennis was working as a railroad engineer in Chicago when he was mortally injured in Pullman, where he was then working, by suffering a fall in the engine house on June 16, 1881. According to Dr. William Johnson, who attended Dennis at the time, Dennis lived for nearly four days before expiring on June 20 at his home in Hyde Park. He was presumably buried in Woodlawn Park.

His widow was living at 6444 Madison Avenue, Woodlawn Park; she applied for and received a pension (no. 320102).

Saturday, July 21, 2007

Robert Barry

Robert Barry was born on April 23 or 28, 1823, in Killarnock, Scotland.

Robert married Jean or Jane Kilpatrick (1822-1898) on June 6, 1845, in New Milne, Scotland, and they had at least eight children: Jeanette, Robert, Florence (1867-1867), John C. (1851-1887), Albert (1854-1921), Alfred E. (b. 1855), Margaret or Maryette (b. 1857) and Warren D. (b. 1859).

Two years after their marriage Robert, his wife and an infant child were just about to leave for America along with Jean’s family, John and Janet Kilpatrick and their children, when at the last minute Robert was taken ill with smallpox and remained behind in Scotland. Jean, their child and Jean’s family arrived first in Montreal, Canada, where the baby died, and Jean’s family moved on to Michigan. A year later Jean joined her family in Woodland, Barry County, Michigan, and shortly afterwards she was joined by Robert.

By 1850 the Kilpatricks had settled in Woodland, Barry County, where they worked a farm. (The Kilpatricks would remain in Woodland, Barry County.) One source reported that the Barry family settled in Kent County on a farm where they lived for about 12 years, and Robert then moved his family to a farm in Sunfield Township, Eaton County, where he would spend most of the rest of his life. In fact, however, Robert and his wife and four children were living on a farm in Sunfield in 1860.

Robert stood 5’9” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was a 41-year old farmer possibly living in Sunfield, when he enlisted in Company E, on January 12, 1864, at Grand Rapids (or possibly Woodland) for 3 years, crediting Sunfield, and was mustered the same day. (It was the same company two of his relatives by marriage Andrew and James Kilpatrick had joined in 1861.) He joined the Regiment on February 1 or 10, and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Robert returned to western Michigan and lived most of his postwar life in Sunfield. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and several children in Vermontville, Sunfield Township and by 1880 he was living with his wife and child in Sunfield Township, working as a farmer. He was probably living in Dellwood, Sunfield Township in Eaton County in 1889, 1890 and 1891 and in Sunfield in 1894. He attended the Paris Exposition in 1880 the same year he visited his boyhood home in Scotland.

After his wife died in 1898 Robert went to live with his son Albert, who probably resided in Woodland. He eventually remarried Mrs. Lydia Mast, who died in 1903. Soon afterwards Robert went to live with his daughter, Mrs. F. P. Turner of Sunfield.

Robert became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in 1891.

In 1891 he applied for and received a pension (no. 748923), drawing $12.00 per month in 1891 and increased to $27.00 per month by 1912.

Robert died, probably of arteriosclerosis, at the home of his daughter, Mrs. F. P. Turner, in Sunfield, Eaton County on February 21, 1913, and funeral services were held at the Kilpatrick church (probably in Woodland), on Tuesday, February 25, officiated by Rev. Jarvis of Lake Odessa. Robert was buried in Woodland Memorial Park cemetery, Barry County.

He left 15 grand-children and 3 great-grandchildren, and was remembered as a gentle man, particularly during his final years when he was suffering from the effects of a debilitating illness. “He always had a smile for everyone,” noted one source.

Friday, July 20, 2007

Baxter G. Barris

Baxter G. Barris, alias “Henry W. Parker”, was born January 5, 1844, in Bloomfield, Oakland County, Michigan, the son of William J. (1810-1895) and Mary (Croninger, 1813-1896).

New York native William married Ohioan Mary, probably in Ohio, in 1833 and resided in Ohio for some years. Between 1840 and 1844 they moved to Michigan and eventually settled in Oakland County sometime. By 1850 William had settled his family in Howell, Livingston County where he worked as a farmer and Baxter lived with his family -- although he was too young to attend school with his older siblings. By 1860 Baxter was working as a farm laborer and attending school with his younger brother Ransom and living with his family in Cascade, Kent County.

Baxter stood 5’6” with blue eyes, dark hair and fair complexion and was 17 years old and may have been living in Whitneyville, Cascade Township when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861, with the consent of the Justice of the Peace. He was listed as absent sick in the hospital in October of 1863, and in a hospital in Washington, DC, from November through May of 1864. He was mustered out of service on June 20, 1864.

It is not known if Baxter returned to Michigan after his discharge. We do know that sometime in the second half of 1864 he reentered the army as a Private in Company H, Nineteenth U.S. Infantry, under the name of Henry Parker. Baxter claimed after the war that “the reason he enlisted under an assumed name was that he did not want any of his relatives to know that he entered the army again as a private soldier and that he was under the influence of liquor at the time he re-enlisted in the regular army.”

"Henry" was reportedly present with the regiment at Lookout Mountain, Tennessee, in 1864, and from October 27-29, 1864, he was treated for constipation. He soon returned to duty but was absent sick on December 2, 1864, and again he probably returned to duty. He was probably on duty with the regiment at Augusta, Georgia in 1865, at Fort Gibson and Fort Arbuckle, Maryland (?), sometime after the close of the war.

He was again treated for a medical problem (circumstances unknown) on December 15 and 17-18, 1865. He was also treated for another unknown illness on March 3, 1866 and for intermittent fever on August 4 and again August 8-9 and August 28-31, September 1-19, 21-26, 29-30 October 12-14 and November 6, 1866. "Henry" was discharged on October 17, 1867, at Camp Burnt Chimney, Arkansas (which may have been near Van Buren, Arkansas).

Baxter probably remained in Arkansas where he resided the rest of his life. Shortly after he left the army he settled in Fort Smith, Arkansas, and, for reasons unknown, took the alias of Henry W. Parker.

In the late 1880s he went to work for the Ketchum Iron Works in Fort Smith, but in May of 1890 he was struck with what he claimed was “paralysis”, and although the extent of his illness is unknown, it appears he suffered a stroke.

He was still living in Fort Smith in 1890 when he applied for a pension (no. 1059158) but the certificate was never granted. By March 26, 1900, he was residing at 223 10th Street in Fort Smith.

Thursday, July 19, 2007

Robert Guild Barr

Robert Guild or Guild R., also known as “Ban”, was born October 8, 1839, in Paris, Kent County, Michigan, eldest son of Robert M. (1813-1910) and Mary W. (Guild, d. 1909).

In 1826 Robert M. moved from New York to Ypsilanti with his parents, and as a young man of 21, he settled along the banks of the Grand River in 1834, the year after the first permanent settlement was established in what would become Grand Rapids. According to one source, Robert M. “prospered rapidly and engaged in” a variety of trades throughout his life in Grand Rapids: he worked as a musician and was reportedly much in demand at the time, he also worked as a carpenter, and eventually opening a meat business and for a time he manufactured matches. “These matches were plain, primitive sulphur and brimstone variety and were dipped carefully by hand.”

Robert M. met and married Mary Guild, the daughter of Joel Guild, one of the founders of Grand Rapids. (Joel had settled along the banks of the Grand River in 1833).

Little is known of the early life of his son Robert G., who was commonly called “Guild” Barr. By 1859-60 he was boarding on the east side of Spring Street between Island and Oakes Streets, and in 1860 was working as a marble cutter living in Grand Rapids' First Ward.

Guild stood 5’8” with brown eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was 21 years old and still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted on May 28, 1861, in Company A. (He may have been a member of the Valley City Guard, the prewar Grand Rapids militia company whose members would form the nucleus of Company A, under the command of Captain Samuel Judd, who would also command Company A.)

He was shot in the right side of his abdomen, at the battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia on May 31, 1862, and subsequently absent sick in the hospital in July of 1862. It was said in later years that he was wounded so badly at Fair Oaks “that the surgeons supposed he would not live, and hence his wounds were not dressed until about 48 hours after” he was brought in to the hospital. “But,” wrote the Grand Rapids Eagle in 1875, “nature rallied, and after a long prostration under hospital treatment, he was discharged . . . came home and so far recovered as to be able to ride on horseback.”

In fact, however, he soon rejoined his Regiment and was wounded a second time, in his right side, at Second Bull Run on August 29, 1862, and was hospitalized until he was discharged for disability on December 12 at Detroit. According to his discharge paper he received a “wound on the right side of [the] abdomen, passing through the right ilium below the crest, three inches from the spinal column a very severe wound producing lameness and deformity. . . .”

After his discharge from the army Guild returned home to Grand Rapids and ran for constable of the First Ward in April of 1863 but was defeated by John Duris.

Soon afterward, he reentered the service as a Second Lieutenant in Company E, Tenth Michigan cavalry on July 10, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was commissioned July 25th. (The Tenth was formally organized in Grand Rapids between September 18 and November 18, 1863.) In mid-August he had opened a recruiting office for the Tenth cavalry in Abel’s Block on Monroe Street. The Grand Rapids Eagle described Lieutenant Barr as “a big-hearted, whole-souled young man, who will ask no services at the hands of his command that he is not ready and willing to perform at the sound of the bugle.”

On September 4 “A war meeting was held at North Brownville,” Kent County, wrote the Eagle, “for the purpose of getting recruits for the Tenth Cavalry. The meeting was quite large and very spirited. It was addressed by J. D. Edmunds and B. A. Harlan, of [Grand Rapids], resulting in the enlisting of several brave boys under Lt. Barr, with a fair prospect of getting more of the same sort.” Soon after leaving the meeting, however, “a rather amusing incident involving Barr and his brother-in-law Jim Fisk, owner of Fisk’s tavern. It seemed that while Barr and Fisk

were returning from the war meeting, held at North Brownville, last evening, the hour being late, or rather early this morning, and both parties having fallen asleep, their horse necessarily took his own course, and regardless of his sleeping load, ran against a stump a short distance beyond the Lake House, and capsized the buggy, broke a wheel to pieces, and ran away. The unconscious riders were, of course, suddenly aroused from their slumbers by being so terribly joggered and unceremoniously spilt upon the ground. Fortunately, they were not injured and had but a short distance to walk ere they reached a stopping place.

Guild was formally mustered into the Tenth cavalry on October 22 at Grand Rapids, and by the end of October of 1863 was serving with the Regiment in Tennessee. In December he was absent sick since December 12 at Frankfort, Kentucky, and absent sick at Point Burnside, Kentucky from February 26, 1864, but by April of 1864 was with his company on detached service at Knoxville, Tennessee.

In August, Guild, along with some 40 others from his Regiment, were captured during the battle of Flat Creek, near Knoxville. Some years later, however, the Eagle claimed that he had been taken prisoner near Strawberry Plains, Tennessee, “by Wheeler's Confederate cavalry, and actually robbed -- stripped of all but his pants and shirt -- marched 3 days barefoot, and was then paroled.” After being paroled, he took leave on September 5, and returned to his home in Grand Rapids. He informed the editor of the Eagle, that “everything going on well in Knoxville and vicinity, where he has been, and everybody in favor of Lincoln for President.”

In November Guild was back on detached service at Knoxville, and in December he was again sick in Knoxville, although by January 21, 1865, he was serving as a member of the general court martial in Knoxville, and remained as such through March. On or about March 27 Guild was ordered to proceed to Washington and be examined for possible transfer to the Veterans Reserve Corps, but the record is unclear as to whether this order was in fact obeyed.

From April through May he was at the “dismounted” camp at Knoxville, reportedly at home in Michigan during May and June and was honorably discharged on May 28, 1865, to accept promotion; he was commissioned a First Lieutenant January 6, 1865, replacing Lieutenant Dunn, and he returned home to Michigan on sick leave for 20 days from June 26, and between July 18 and 25 he attempted to extend his furlough. By September and October of 1865 he was on duty with his company. Guild was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865, at Memphis.

After the war Guild returned to his home in Grand Rapids where he resumed his work as a stone and marble cutter, and in 1865-66 was living at 31 Spring Street. By 1867-68 he was residing on Paris Street and working for William Laraway & Co.

Guild married New Jersey native Caroline “Carrie” Harding (1840-1872) on May 1, 1866, and they had at least three children: Clyde (1867-1872), Hattie (1869-1873) and Clara (1869). (The two girls may in fact have been twins.)

Carrie died in childbirth on October 17, 1872 (probably giving birth to a fourth child who also died it would appear), and their five-year-old son Clyde died 11 days later; Hattie died about a year after that and Robert was left with one daughter, Clara Bell. (According to her pension application filed some years later Clara was reportedly born March 22, 1869, at the home of one Jacob Harding, probably Carrie's family, in White Lake, Oakland County, although she is not listed in the 1870 census along with the other members of her family.)

In 1870 Guild was working as a stone cutter and living with his wife and two children in Paris.

Guild was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1863 he applied for and received pension no. 12321.

He lived the remainder of his life in Grand Rapids, working as a stone-cutter.

In the early 1870s Guild was stricken with cancer. It was reported in the Grand Rapids Democrat of August 20, 1875, that he seemed to recover his strength, but his health failed for the last time and he died of cancer at his home near Reed’s Lake on October 18, 1875.

The Eagle wrote in its obituary that Robert was “A young man of fine promise, he was among the first who sprang to arms in defense of the integrity of the nation, in company A of the ‘Old Third’ Mich. Inf., which with such heroism and at such terrible sacrifices, won imperishable honors at the beginning of the war.” The paper added that he was a “Brave, generous, and as ardent soldier as ever went forth to do battle in a righteous cause, [and] was with his comrades in the front where his Regiment met its hardest fate and severest losses.” Further, that “Guild Barr was one of nature's noblemen, kind, loving, generous, genial and sociable.” The paper also noted that “a darling girl about 7 years of age, is left an orphan.”

The funeral took place at Allen Durfee’s funeral parlor on October 22, and former Old Third comrade George E. Judd acted as one of the pall-bearers. Guild was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section 2 lot 28.

Some years after Robert’s death a pension was filed on Clara's behalf (no. 380672) but the application was rejected in 1893 on the grounds that Clara had passed the age of 16 by the time her father had died. In fact the application reported Guild's date of death as 1885, the year Clara turned 16, when in fact it was 1875. certificate was never granted. Clara was reportedly living in Pittsfield, Washtenaw County by May of 1888. Cuirously one F. C. Crittenden is listed as "guardian for a minor," presumably Clara, in 1898 when she would have been nearly 30 years old, and living in Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, Michigan. By 1904 Clara was living in Santa Barbara, California.

By 1880 Robert’s father was living with his daughter and her husband, William Laraway, in Grand Rapids Township.

Wednesday, July 18, 2007

Andrew P. Barnum - updated 22/04/2008

Andrew P. Barnum was born September 19, 1841, in Chenango County, New York, the son of Isaac (1804-1878) and Roxanna (Philley, 1801-1872).

New York natives Isaac and Roxanna (who could not read or write) were married in 1823, probably in New York where they resided for some years. Isaac moved his family from New York to Michigan between 1842 and 1846, and by 1850 Andrew was living on the family farm in Woodland, Barry County where his older siblings attended school. In 1860 Andrew was still living with his family in Woodland.

Andrew stood 5’9” with dark eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion, and was a 20-year-old farmer possibly living in Lowell, Kent County or in Ionia or Barry County when he enlisted on April 12, 1862 -- although he claimed later that he enlisted on March 13, 1862 -- in Company E, and was mustered the same day. (Company E was composed in large part by men from Clinton and Ingham counties, as well as parts of Ionia County.)

According to the testimony of David Crawford, formerly a Lieutenant in Company E, just after the battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, Andrew “was accidentally wounded by a pistol shot in the left face, finger & right foot by a comrade who had picked up a revolver on the battle field and was examining the same.” In any case, by late June Andrew was listed in the hospital at Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, having been wounded accidentally in the hand and foot. He was admitted to Bellevue hospital in New York City on July 7, 1862, and was discharged for disability on August 29 or September 2, 1862, at New York City, from Bellevue.

After he left the army Andrew returned to Michigan.

He married Michigan native Cornelia (“Cora”) J. Maxson (1843-1915) on August 21, 1864, in Chester, Eaton County; they had at least four children: Carrie (Mrs. Fred Niles, 1865-1947), Della (b. 1868), Elnora or Nora (b. 1870) and Osie (1876).

According to Andrew’s sister Sarah, after they were married Andrew and Cora moved on to the Barnum family farm in Woodland, Barry County, and worked it for some years. He also worked as a carpenter.

Indeed, by 1870 Andrew, owning some $3000 worth of real estate, was working a farm next to his parents’ place and living with his wife and daughters in Woodland, Barry County. He was still living in Woodland in 1880.

By 1888 he had settled in Eagle, Clinton County, but by around 1896 he had returned to Barry County and was living in Nashville. Four years later he was reported living in Vermontville, Eaton County and in Grand Ledge, Eaton County in 1910 and 1911.

He was probably a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, was a Methodist and in 1882 he applied for and received a pension (no. 672,688), drawing $12.00 per month in 1907.

Andrew died of arteriosclerosis on August 11, 1911, at his home in Grand Ledge and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. C. E. Pollok, pastor of the Methodist Church in Grand Ledge. He was buried on August 14 in Oakwood cemetery, Grand Ledge: section C, lot 62, grave 1.

In 1911 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 730,878). She was reported as an honorary member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and living in Woodland, Barry County after his death.

Monday, July 16, 2007

Simon Peter Barnhard

Simon Peter Barnhard was born November 9, 1844, in Ottawa County, Ohio, son of Jacob (b. 1809) and Lucinda (Reed, b. 1820).

After the death of his first wife, Sarah in 1836 Jacob married Ohio-born Lucinda or Lorinda Reed (b. 1820) in 1840, probably in Ohio. Sometime in the late 1840s the family moved from Ohio to Chicago where they were residing between 1847 and 1848, but within two years had moved across Lake Michigan to Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan. According to one source, after living in Muskegon for about a year, local “Indians poled them up the Muskegon River in two canoes to Croton and while there Indian boys were his playmates and companions.”

Another source wrote that there were “No villages . . . in existence and all was a barren wilderness where they settled, nobody but roving trappers being in this part of the country. Their means of transportation from Muskegon to Croton was via the Muskegon River. . . .” (It is possible that only Simon’s older half-brothers, Horatio and John made the initial trek westward in the 1840s, the remainder of the family staying in Ohio until the mid-1850s.) In any case, by 1855 the family had settled in Dayton, Newaygo County, reportedly building the first house in the Township. In 1860 Simon was a farmer living with his parents in Dayton.

Simon stood 5’5” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 18 years old and probably still living in Dayton when he enlisted in Company K on August 9, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (His two older half-brothers John and Horatio had enlisted in March of 1862 in Company H, which was made up predominantly of men from Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Simon joined the Regiment on September 8, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was present for duty from September of 1862 through February of 1863. He was wounded in the right thigh at Chancellorsville, Virginia on May 3, 1863; he was also reported was missing in action. And in fact, Simon had been taken prisoner at Chancellorsville on May 3 and paroled on May 15 at United States Ford (near Chancellorsville), subsequently admitted to the Corps hospital and then sent on to Washington, DC.

He eventually returned to the Third Michigan (at least by October of 1863) and was present for duty through early spring of 1864. On May 6, 1864, he was wounded a second time, in leg and left elbow at the Wilderness, Virginia, and subsequently hospitalized. He was transferred to Company K, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent wounded. He probably never joined the Fifth Michigan and was discharged for disability on December 5, 1864, from Columbian Hospital in Washington, DC.

After his discharge Simon returned home to Newaygo County.

He married Sarah Augusta Randolph (1848-1940) in Newaygo County on December 25, 1866. They had at least seven children: Wellington Emer (1868-1928), Edward (1869-70), Zella (1871-1948) Elwood Irving, Lula May (b. 1872), Charles Ward (b. 1874), and Clara Augusta (b. 1876).

Apparently Simon went back to school for one year, and subsequently taught school for another four more years. During this time he purchased an 80-acre farm adjoining his parents’ land and lived there for some 11 years; in 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Sheridan, Newaygo County. He eventually moved Fremont where he engaged in business; in 1882 he was reportedly working for the Patron’s Cooperative Co. He was living in Fremont working as a merchant in 1883 drawing $16.00 per month for a wound to the left elbow (pension no. 35,561).

About 1890 he sold his business interests in Fremont and moved to White Cloud, Newaygo County where he engaged in business and farming ventures for the remainder of his life. He served as clerk of Dayton Township, as school inspector, village councilman and school trustee in Fremont and village trustee in White Cloud, and he was living in White Cloud around 1905.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and also very active in the local Grand Army of the Republic Henry Dobson Post No. 182 in Fremont, serving as the post’s Sergeant Major at its inception in 1883 and as Senior Vice Commander in 1886. Politically he considered himself an Independent. He was also a member of the Congregational Church.

Simon was reportedly stricken with “paralysis” (possibly the result of a stroke) on August 24, 1912, from which he never recovered. He died of “paralysis” at his home in Denver, Newaygo County, on May 24, 1913, and the funeral was held on May 28 at the Congregational Church, Rev. George Benford, former pastor of the church, officiating. Simon was buried in Prospect Hill cemetery in White Cloud: sec. B, row 2.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 770052).

Sunday, July 15, 2007

John Barnhard

John Barnhard was born November 18, 1836, in Sandusky, Ohio, the son of Jacob (b. 1809) and Sarah (Hyland, d. 1836).

After the death of his first wife, Ohio native Jacob married Ohio-born Lucinda or Lorinda Reed (b. 1820) in 1840, probably in Ohio. By the late 1840s John’s family had moved from Ohio to Chicago where they were residing between 1847 and 1848, but within two years had moved across Lake Michigan to Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan. According to one source, after living in Muskegon for about a year, local “Indians poled them up the Muskegon River in two canoes to Croton and while there Indian boys were his playmates and companions.” (It is possible that only John and his older brother Horatio made this emigration westward in the late 1840s followed in the mid-1850s by their parents and the rest of the family.) By 1855 the family had moved to Dayton, Newaygo County, reportedly building the first house in the Township.

In 1857 John assisted his father, brother and two uncles in cutting a road from Croton to the family farm. In the fall of 1858 John purchased from the government 80 acres in Dayton on which he built a cabin.

In 1860 John was elected Dayton Township clerk and that same year he was working as a laborer and living in Dayton, when he married his first wife, Connecticut native Maryette or Margaret Stone (1843-1884), on November 25, 1860. (She may have been a sister to Phoebe Stone who married John’s brother Horatio in 1859.) They had at least two children: Gilbert A. (b. 1868) and Herbert A. “Together,” wrote one source, “they toiled as only those pioneers did toil to build the homes that stand as monuments today to their greatness.”

John stood 5’8” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 25 years old and probably still living in Dayton when he enlisted with his older brother Horatio in Company H on March 12, 1862 at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and he was mustered the same day in Grand Rapids -- their younger half-brother Simon would enlist in Company K in August. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

In July of 1862 John was sick in the hospital through August, and allegedly deserted on September 21, 1862 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia (he was probably still hospitalized). In any case, he returned to the Regiment probably on October 26, 1862 at Catlett’s Station, Virginia.

John was shot in the right forearm at Spotsylvania, Virginia on May 12, 1864, and subsequently hospitalized. He was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan Infantry, upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent sick. In July he was listed as a Corporal although he still remained absent wounded. Although he was reported in January of 1865 as having died, in fact he remained hospitalized until he was discharged on account of his wounds on December 24, 1864 (or February 26, 1865), at Augur general hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After his discharge from the army John returned to his family in Michigan and by 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned some $4500 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and one child in Hesperia, Newaygo County. By 1880 John was working as a farmer and living with his his wife and one son in Dayton, Newaygo County.

He was living in the Fremont area in 1883 drawing $8.00 per month for a wound to the right arm (pension no. 27,554, dated February 1865), and again in 1888; he was living in Dayton, Newaygo County in 1890 and 1894.

After his wife died in 1884 John married May Thompson on May 4, 1886, and they had at least two children: Ernest and Horatio (the latter probably named after John’s brother who died during the war). They were living in Hesperia, Oceana County in 1890, but by 1911 he had returned to Fremont.

He was for many years a director in the Grangers’ Mutual Insurance Co., a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, as well as a member of Grand Army of the Republic Henry Dobson Post No. 182 in Fremont and a charter member of Hesperia Grange P. of H. no. 495.

According to one source, John “was a member of the Trustee Board of the local M.E. Church, a regular attendant of the Sunday School and preaching service and always manifested great interest in the church and welfare of the community.”

John died of myocarditis on Wednesday November 27, 1915, in possibly in either Hesperia or Dayton Township, and was buried in Maple Grove cemetery in Fremont. “The love and respect,” wrote the Fremont Times-Indicator,

in which he was held by his neighbors and coworkers was manifested by their presence in large numbers at his funeral which was held in the little church he so much loved. The casket was covered with beautiful flowers and draped with the flag of his country. Rev. M. A. Oldt and Rev. George van Wingerden spoke words of consolation to the bereaved and the choir sang his favorite hymns. As the shades of evening were falling he was laid to rest in the cemetery at Fremont. In the passing of John Barnhard this community has sustained a loss that will long be felt. A pioneer who has lived on the farm he hewed out of the wilderness over 60 years [ago], whose life was truly crowned with success. We shall miss his cheerful presence, his wise councils, but the influence of his life will be an inspiration to those who follow after and his good works will long remain.

In 1915 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 803308).

Saturday, July 14, 2007

Horatio Barnhard

Horatio Barnhard was born 1833 in Ottawa County, Ohio, the son of Jacob (b. 1809) and Sarah (Hyland, d. 1836).

After the death of his first wife, Jacob married Ohio-born Lucinda or Lorinda Reed (b. 1820) in 1840, probably in Ohio. In the 1840s Horatio’s family moved from Ohio to Chicago where they were residing in 1845 or 1848. In any case they remained in Illinois but a few months before moving on to Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan, where they lived for a year before settling in the Newaygo County area, probably in Croton. (It is possible that only Horatio and his younger brother John made this emigration westward in the late 1840s followed in the mid-1850s by their parents and the rest of the family.)

By 1855 the family had moved to Dayton, Newaygo County, reportedly building the first house in the Township. On February 17, 1859, Horatio married Phoebe S. Stone (b. 1841), probably sister to Maryette Stone who married his brother John in 1860, and they had at least one child, a daughter Ocelia (d. 1863). By 1860 Horatio was a farmer living with his wife in Dayton.

Horatio stood 5’5” with blue eyes, sandy hair and a sandy complexion and was 29 years old and still living in Dayton when he enlisted with his younger brother John in Company H on March 12, 1862 at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and he was mustered the same day -- their younger half-brother Simon would enlist in Company K in August. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers”, was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

Wallace W. Dickinson, also of Company K, wrote that Barnhard received a slight wound in the head while the regiment was engaged during the action at Fair Oaks, Virginia on May 31, 1862, and he was subsequently absent sick in a general hospital in Washington, DC. He soon recovered, however, and rejoined the Regiment. Horatio was initially listed as missing in action on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, but was in fact killed in action.

Horatio was presumably buried among the unknown soldiers removed from the battlefield at Second Bull Run and reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.

In 1863 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 149504). By 1871 she had remarried a Mr. Anderson.

Gettysburg with Ranger Mannie

Here's a little video from our trip to Gettysburg this past May 1 with friends Mannie and Virginia. We had a blast -- but then with those two you can't experience anything else!

Wish you were there,

Steve

Wednesday, July 11, 2007

Francis Henry Barlow

Francis Henry Barlow was born 1826 in Rome, Oneida County, New York.

In 1820 there was one Francis Barlow living in Western, Oneida County, New York, and in 1830 there was one Elisha Barlow living in Rome, New York.

In any case, Francis was married to Canadian-born Caroline L. “Carrie” (Beebe) on July 3, 1847, in Oakfield, Genesee County, New York, and they had at least three children: Ellen “Nellie” Jane (b. 1851, Mrs. Glenn Buchanan), Mary Louisa (b. 1854, Mrs. Marshall Daggett) and Effie Carrie (b. 1857, Mrs. Silas Barrows).

According to one of their daughters, the family was living on St. Helena island in the straits of Mackinac when Ellen was born and on Thunder Bay island on Lake Huron (13 miles offshore from Alpena) when Mary was born in 1854. (Caroline was reportedly attended by only “a half-breed Indian woman as her midwife and nurse.) By 1856 when their daughter Effie was born they were reportedly living in Grand Rapids, Kent County.

Around 1857 they settled in Lamont, Ottawa County, where Francis (known generally as “Henry”) ran a cooper shop. Franklin Tubbs, whose family also lived in Lamont, and who too would in the Third Michigan, claimed in later years that he had boarded with the Barlows at various “intervals prior to 1861.” In fact Mrs. Barlow said later that Franklin did board with them while he attended school, as did one Thaddeus Tubbs. By 1860 “Henry” was working as a cooper and living with his wife and children in Tallmadge, Ottawa County. According to his wife, by the time the war broke out Francis was still running a cooper shop in Lamont. His wife moved her family into Grand Rapids after Francis enlisted.

Francis stood 5’11” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 35-year-old mechanic and cooper living in Ottawa County when he enlisted as Corporal in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) According to Simon Brennan, formerly an officer in Company I, there had been some question about Francis being mustered in with the regiment in June of 1861. In fact, according to Brennan Francis did not leave Grand Rapids with the regiment on the morning of June 13 but left soon afterwards and caught up with the regiment as it was passing through Pontiac, Michigan, and that he was not officially mustered in until the regiment reached Washington.

In any case, Francis soon became quite ill. Brennan thought he had typhoid fever. He noted that Francis “was all run down, very much emaciated from his sickness & could hardly walk.” He thought Francis had been sent to the regimental hospital. Indeed, Francis was discharged for chronic rheumatism on October 12, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia. Apparently there was some problem at first with his discharge. Again, according to Simon Brennan, he remembered Barlow well “because Col. McConnell [commanding the Third Michigan] & Cap Weatherwax [commanding Company I] had quite a row about having him mustered out of service. It was claimed by the Col. that because of some informality about his muster in, he was not entitled to a discharge certificate.”

After his discharge from the army Francis returned home to Michigan, probably to his family in Grand Rapids, where, according to his widow, he attempted to work as a cooper for Elijah Dart, who was then running a cooper shop in the city. However, since Francis was unable to support his family his wife felt compelled to take their children and move to the house of her brother, Levi Beebe, in Morris, Grundy County, Illinois. She left in February of 1862.

Francis meanwhile moved in with his brother John in Paris, Kent County. According to Lansing Rathbun who lived about 1/2 miles from the Barlow brothers, John was a blacksmith and “the shop was large enough so that Henry had his cooper shop in a part of it. However, Francis became increasingly worse and his wife felt compelled to return to Grand Rapids to take care of him which she did in the fall of 1862. The family initially lived on Turner Street before moving to a house on the corner of Third and Broadway Streets.

By February of 1864 he was living in Grand Rapids when he applied for a pension (application no. 40611, cert. no 873024).

According to his wife since his return from the army Francis had been treated by Dr. Woodruff, Dr. Hempel (a German physician), Dr. Carpenter, Dr. Maynard and Dr. Garlock. Francis claimed in his sworn statement that “During the latter half of September of 1861, owing to cold from exposure while on picket and guard duty, and uncomfortable camp accommodations, straw for bedding . . . tents thin, and duty constant at Arlington Heights, he took cold, which settled in his lungs, and also rheumatism in his knee, hip, ankles, shoulders and his left side generally, and in consequence was discharged.”

And his wife claimed years afterward that upon his return home he suffered from an inflammatory rheumatism in his hips which caused him to go around on crutches. “He also had a terrible cough, then, had gatherings in his throat, and raised a good deal of corruption from his lungs. He complained of great pain in his side and was never able to work enough to earn his board, after he came home from the war.”

Francis died of tubercular consumption, at his home on Broadway between Third and Fourth Streets in Grand Rapids on June 14, 1864, and his funeral was held at the Presbyterian church on the west side of the Grand River (the same church to which James Bennett, formerly of Company B, belonged); the service being read by Rev. Platt the Presbyterian minister. According to his widow Rev. Platt had visited Francis a number of times before he died. Allen Durfee was reported to be the undertaker in charge of the arrangements (in fact it was quite probably a Mr. Judd was then the leading undertaker in the city and for whom Durfee was working at the time).

According to his widow Francis was buried in Oak Hill cemetery in Grand Rapids. Another source reported that he was in fact buried in the Soldiers’ Lot in Valley City cemetery. Lansing Rathbun of Paris, Kent County, testified in 1894 that at one point after Francis died he “was talking with his brother John about his death . . . and he couldn’t tell just the location of the grave. He knew he was buried in the Valley City cemetery, in the Soldiers’ lot, but he couldn’t tell which was the grave as it was not distinguished by any mark.” This was in fact most likely the area presently known as the Watson GAR Post lot where the majority of interments are presently marked as unknown.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 399541). In July of 1864 Caroline remarried Marshall Barrows. According to Olive Cook, a friend of Caroline’s, she “was quite surprised when I heard of her remarriage so soon [five weeks] after her first husband’s death.” (Caroline’s sister Jane Waycott and her own brother Levi Beebe were both reportedly equally surprised to hear she had remarried so soon after Francis had died.) By 1870 they were living in Grand Rapids’ First Ward (they had two children: Myrtle, b. 1867 and Jenny, b. 1869).

After Marshall’s death in 1891 Caroline was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 399541). In 1895 a pension was also granted on behalf of a minor child, Michigan resident Ellen J. Buchanan (no. 444263).

In 1894 Caroline was keeping a boarding house at 499 Canal Street in Grand Rapids.

Monday, July 09, 2007

Cornelius Henry Barkhuff

Cornelius Henry Barkhuff was born 1817 or 1820 in Montgomery, Orange County, New York, possibly the son of William and Rhoda (Cummings).

If he was the son of William and Rhoda his parents were both born in New York and married sometime before 1812.

In any case, Cornelius married New York native Arvilla J. or G. (1827-1865), possibly in New York, and they had at least five children: Edgar A. (b. 1846) , Casper (b. 1849), William (b. 1853), Martha (b. 1854) and Willard (b. 1859).

Cornelius eventually left New York and by 1846 he had settled his family in Michigan. By 1850 Cornelius and his family were living in Albion, Calhoun County, with the Kesley family and where Cornelius worked as a laborer. By 1860 Cornelius was working as a farmer and living with his wife (who was blind) and children in Prairieville, Barry County.

Cornelius stood 5’7’” with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was 46 years old and working as a farmer possibly living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on December 18, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Barry County; he was mustered on January 5, 1864, at Grand Rapids. Cornelius joined the Regiment on February 10, and was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan infantry Regiments on June 10, 1864, when he was reported absent sick.

According to his military service record, Cornelius was sent back to Michigan to recover his health and was a patient in the Detroit Barracks hospital when he was admitted with chronic diarrhea to Harper hospital in Detroit on October 13, 1864. Although reportedly returned to duty from Harper hospital on November 28, 1864, for reasons which remain unexplained he was in fact transferred to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and remained on the sick list until he was discharged on June 5, 1865 at Satterlee hospital, Philadelphia.

However, Cornelius claimed in 1885 that “after the battle of Spotsylvania [on May 12, 1864] on the march to Coal [Cold] Harbor in 1864 [he] was first sent to hospital at White House Landing, Va. It was a tent or field hospital [and he] was sick from chronic diarrhea and fever. [He] was transferred from there to Washington, DC, Lincoln Hospital [and] from there sent Harwood Hospital ward 7, I think. I was very sick for six weeks or more. I think I was from there sent to Philadelphia . . . to be treated for sore eyes [but] can't tell how long I was in that hospital. But was sent from there to Detroit Mich[igan] and was there treated for sore eyes was in Harpers Hospital think it was ward 4.” He further stated that from Harper Hospital he was returned to Virginia and sent to Camp Distribution, probably near Alexandria. He was again transferred to Harwood Hospital in Washington and back to Philadelphia where he was discharged as noted above.

Following his discharge from the army Cornelius returned to Michigan, probably to Barry County. He was probably living in Hastings, Barry County when he married his second wife, New York native Marian Mosher (1834-1917), and they had at least two children, Ada (1867-1939) and Nellie (b. 1869). (His first wife reportedly died while Cornelius was away in the army in 1865.)

By 1870 Cornelius was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Orangeville, Barry County. Also living with them were his two sons William and Willard, as well as two teenage siblings John and Alice Gillespie (possibly the children of Marian).

Cornelius was living in Prairieville, Barry County in 1873, when he testified in the pension claim of another former member of the Old Third, Reuben Babcock (also from Barry County). In 1880 he was reported as married and was living in Prairieville with the family of Jesse Chase, and working as a farm laborer. He resided in Hastings, Barry County where for some years where he worked as a farmer. Cornelius was living in Prairieville, Barry County in 1884 when he attended the Sixth Annual Reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors, at Battle Creek, Calhoun County. Interestingly he is listed with the Fifth Michigan infantry rather than those in the Third.

In May of 1889 Marian divorced Cornelius (she claimed he had deserted her) and he married for a third time, on January 10, 1893, to a widow by the name of Delia A. Thomas McCluer, in Hastings, Barry County.

He resided at various times in Orangeville, Barry County and in 1890 he was living in Richland, Kalamazoo County.

Cornelius was a member of G.A.R. Sackett Post No. 320 in Prairieville. In 1885 he applied for and received a pension (no. 346,844).

Cornelius was back living in Hastings where he died on May 13, 1898, and was buried on May 14, 1898 in Riverside cemetery, Hastings: block L-north, lot no. 74, grave northeast 1/4-1, having been removed from block G, lot no. 33.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 677036) but the certificate was never granted.

Wednesday, July 04, 2007

Frederick L. Barker

Frederick L. Barker was born 1843 in Oakland, Oakland County, Michigan, son of Jesse A. (b. 1820) and Caroline (b. 1821).

New York native Jesse and English-born Caroline (in Kent) were probably married sometime before 1843, possibly in New York or perhaps in Michigan. In any case they had settled in eastern Michigan by 1843 and Jesse may have been living in Manchester, Washtenaw County in 1845. They moved to the west side of the state, eventually settling in Green, Mecosta County, where Fred grew up on his family’s farm. By 1860 Fred was working as a farm laborer and lumberman and living with his family in Green, Mecosta County.

Fred stood 5’10” with black eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 18 years old and living with his family in either Green or in Big Rapids, Mecosta County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company K on May 13, 1861. He reenlisted as a Sergeant on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Sparta, Kent County, and was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864. He probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Although the details are sketchy, Fred was reportedly treated for syphilis from February 23 to March 5, 1864, and again on March 10, 12 to 21. In any case, he was sufficiently well enough to be on duty with the regiment and was shot in the right arm or shoulder on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, resulting in the loss of the use of that arm. Fred stated in 1866 that “a musket ball passed through the right lung and shoulder shattering the shoulder blade & cutting the muscles & nerves in such a manner that the right arm hangs perfectly powerless & useless by the side.” He was subsequently admitted to Finley hospital in Washington, DC, on May 26 with a gunshot wound to the right shoulder, and was still absent in the hospital when he was transferred as a Sergeant to Company I, Fifth Michigan Infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was absent on furlough from June 25.

Fred returned from furlough on August 17 and although probably still absent wounded, in August he was promoted to First Sergeant, then to Second Lieutenant on August 12, 1864, and commissioned as such August 10, replacing Lieutenant Theodore Hetz. In fact, according to the Mecosta County Pioneer, Fred was promoted sometime in July. “The new Lieutenant,” wrote the paper on July 22, “was quite surprised to hear of his good fortune, as it was entirely unexpected. He has gone to Grand Rapids for the purpose of getting his furlough extended, we believe, as his wound yet entirely disables his right arm although improving.” The editor of the paper added that “We heartily congratulate Lieut. barker on his promotion, as it is an evidence that his services have been such in the army as to merit the compliment.”

In September he was still listed as absent wounded, but was present for duty the following month. In November he was reported as First Lieutenant of Company H, commissioned on October 14, 1864, replacing Lieutenant Winans, and promoted to Captain in February of 1865, near Petersburg, Virginia, commissioned November 7, replacing Captain Wakenshaw. He was mustered out of service on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

In 1865 Fred applied for and received a pension (19296?).

After the war Fred returned to Michigan and attended the Agricultural College in Lansing following which he went to Poughkeepsie, Dutchess County, New York, where he took a commercial course (according to one report his parents sold a cow to help pay his tuition). He was living in Poughkeepsie in September of 1866. Fred quit school however and engaged in various businesses in New York and Pennsylvania.

He eventually returned to Michigan (his parents were living in Green, Mecosta County in 1870), probably in the late 1860s or perhaps early 1870s when he reportedly came to Big Rapids and opened up an iron works which proved to be less of a commercial success, and which failure caused his parents to lose their farm in Mecosta County. They eventually settled with Fred and his family in Crawford County probably in 1877 (he may have moved to Crawford the previous year). Fred eventually became deeply interested in timber lands in northeastern Michigan and was a member of a lumbering firm in Lewiston.

In 1875 he acquired 160 acres of land through the Traverse City, Grand Traverse County, land office and in 1881 another 80 acres through Reed City in Osceola County.

He was married to Michigan native May M. Hoskins (d. 1891) of Lansing on October 11, 1871, in Lansing, Ingham County, and they had at two children, Flora and Helen May (b. 1885).

By 1880 Frederick was working as a surveyor and living with his wife in Frederic, Crawford County. They were living in Frederic in 1885.

According to the Fifth Michigan infantry Regimental history Fred died on November 30, 1888, but in fact was living in Frederic, Crawford County in 1890. His wife May died in April of 1891 in Frederick and Fred was reportedly in Albert, Montmorency County in 1894. During the Twenty-third annual reunion of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association held on December 20, 1894, it was noted that he had died recently. Indeed, Fred died on October 12, 1894, in Grayling, Crawford County, “by wounds received in service,” noted one source. He was presumably buried in Grayling, or possibly in Big Rapids.

His daughter Helen became the ward of one C. B. Seymour of Crawford County, Pennsylvania (not Michigan). She received a minor’s pension (no. 418553).