Sunday, November 30, 2008

Mathias Greenwald

Mathias Greenwald, also known as “Greenwalt,” was born in 1835.

Mathias was 26 years old and had probably just recently moved from Cook County, Illinois to Grand Rapids, Michigan, where he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861, and transferred to Company C on June 9 or 10, 1861. He was present for duty from January of 1862 until he was taken prisoner on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia.

He was subsequently confined at Andersonville prison, where he died of disease on August 13, 1864, and was interred in the Andersonville National Cemetery: grave 5557.

In 1865 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 108184).

Saturday, November 29, 2008

Franklin Green

Franklin Green was born 1845 in Cayuga County, New York.

Franklin left New York State and came to western Michigan sometime before 1864. (In 1860 there was a 10-year-old Franklin Green, born in New York, living with his parents in Ada, Kent County.)

He stood 5’5” with black eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion, and was a 19-year-old carpenter possibly living in Yankee Springs, Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on February 9, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Yankee Springs, and was mustered on February 19. He joined the Regiment March 29, and that same day he wrote to a Mr. Bailey asking that he “inform me whether Mr. Ephraim Parsons [of Company F] got my bonds [?] for my town bounty; he said that he would get them and send the money to me but I have not heard from him since. If he did not get them I wish that you would sell them and send me the money if you please or send me the bonds and I will pay you for your trouble.”

Franklin was admitted to Campbell general hospital in Washington, DC, on May 16, 1864, suffering from “debility,” and was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

He was probably furloughed in the summer and was back in Michigan by mid-July. On July 24, 1864, Dr. Alonzo Wate, examining surgeon for the provost marshal in Grand Rapids certified that Green was “suffering from a severe cough and night sweats & debility in consequence thereof he is in my opinion unfit for duty.” He remained absent sick until he was mustered out of service on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

No pension seems to be available.

In 1870 there was a 20-year-old, New York-born laborer named Franklin Green living with and/or working for the Stilwell family in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward.

Thursday, November 27, 2008

Edgar Green

Edgar Green was born 1839 in Genesee County, New York, the son of Josiah (b. 1816) and Clarissa (1819-1887).

Edgar’s parents were both born in New York and presumably married there. The family came to Michigan, probably from New York, sometime between 1839 and 1845, and by 1850 Josiah had settled his family on a farm in Grand Blanc, Genesee County, where Edgar was attending school with his siblings. By 1860 they were living in Pewamo, Lyons Township, Ionia County where Josiah was a farmer. It is possible that in 1860 Edgar was working as a farm laborer and/or living with one Jay Olmstead in North Plains, Ionia County.

In any event, Edgar stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was 22 years old and probably working as a laborer in Clinton (or perhaps Ionia) County when he enlisted as Corporal in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) He was discharged on June 6, 1862, from Fifth Street hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for chronic bronchitis.

Edgar probably returned to his family’s home in Ionia (or Clinton) County, where he apparently died on June 20, 1863, presumably from “bronchitis,” and was buried in East Plains cemetery, Clinton County.

No pension seems to be available.

In 1870 his parents were reported living on a farm in Pewamo, Dallas Township, Clinton County.

Wednesday, November 26, 2008

Elmon Greely

Elmon Greely, also known as "Elmo," was born in 1831.

Elmon was 30 years old and probably living in the vicinity of Hastings, Barry County (or perhaps in Ionia County), Michigan, when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city, and Elmon eventually enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861.

He was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and presumably buried among the unknown soldiers in Seven Pines National Cemetery.

No pension seems to be available.

Tuesday, November 25, 2008

Edward Grayson

Edward Grayson was born 1830 in Preston, Lancastershire, England.

Edward left England and immigrated to America, eventually moving to Ohio.

He stood 5’9” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion, and was 33 years old and possibly living in Ravenna, Portage County, Ohio when he became a substitute for Mahlon E. Bailey, drafted on February 17 for 9 months at Lenox, Macomb County, Michigan. Grayson then enlisted in Unassigned on March 15, 1863, at Lenox for 3 years, crediting Macomb County, and was sent to the Regiment on March 26.

There is no further record.

However, it seems that in 1860 there was one Edward Grayson, born 1830 in England, living in Chicago’s Eighth Ward, married to a woman named Esther, born 1835 in England. He was probably the same Edward Grayson who was a resident of Chicago when he enlisted as a Private on February 23, 1864, in Company K, Twenty-second Illinois infantry and was mustered the following day. Again, there is no further record.

No pension seems to be available.

In 1890 there was one Edward Grayson living in Mount Pleasant, Beaufort County, South Carolina; no civil war service is recorded.

Monday, November 24, 2008

Elmer Leroy Graves

Elmer Leroy Graves was born 1843 in Oneida County, New York.

Elmer moved to western Michigan, probably from New York, sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and light complexion, and was an 18-year-old laborer probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was wounded in the right arm on May 31, 1862, resulting in amputation of the limb, and by mid-July was a patient in National Hotel hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, having had his “right arm amputated” but reported to be doing very well.”

He remained absent sick in the hospital from July until he was discharged on August 22, 1862, at Baltimore, for “loss of right arm at middle third by amputation after shell wound”; his discharge paper also noted that he was four-fifths incapacitated from “earning a livelihood by manual labor.”

In 1862 he applied for and received a pension (application no. 2541).

Elmer probably returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army.

He married Michigan native Martha J. (b. 1853), and they had at least two children: Dewitt (b. 1875) and Roscoe (b. 1878).

He probably died sometime around 1879, possibly in Michigan. According to one source “Elmer Leroy” is buried in Branch County.

In 1879 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 184547). In 1880 his widow and two children were living in Matteson, Branch County. By 1890 she was living in Bronson, Branch County, listed as “Leroy’s” widow.

Sunday, November 23, 2008

William Grant

William Grant was born 1830 in Seneca County, New York.

William left New York and moved to western Michigan. In 1860 there was one William Grant, age 22 and born in Scotland, living and working in Ada and in Vergennes, Kent County.

William stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was 31 years old and possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was discharged on account of asthma on May 30, 1862, at the Patent Office hospital in Washington, DC.

It is not known if William returned to Michigan after he left the army.

No pension seems to be available.

Saturday, November 22, 2008

Peter V. Granger

Peter V. Granger was born July 26, 1833, in Hume, Allegany County, New York, the son of Gideon or Girden (1800-1876) and Nancy A. (Flanagan, 1801-1884).

Gideon and Nancy were married on March 13, 1822, possibly in Granville, New York or perhaps Whitehall and resided in Lamont, New York in 1825 but by 1829 had settled in Hume, New York where they lived for many years. Gideon was still living in Hume in 1850.

Peter left New York and moved to western Michigan sometime before 1857. (It appears Gideon was living in Wiscoy, Allegany count, New York in 1860.)

He was living in Saranac, Ionia County when he married Wisconsin native Juliette Sanborn (b. 1838) on November 11, 1857, and they had at least one and possibly two children: Margaret (b. 1859) and possibly Helen (b. 1866). By 1860 he was working as a carpenter and living with his wife and daughter in Boston, Ionia County.

By January of 1861 Peter had joined the “Boston Light Guards” as Second Second Lieutenant; the “Guards” was one of several prewar militia companies formed in western Michigan and some of its members would serve as the nucleus for Company D Third Michigan.

Peter was 27 years old and probably still residing in Ionia County when he enlisted as First Lieutenant of Company D on May 13, 1861; he may have been related to Munson Granger who was also from Ionia County and would also enlist in Company D.

While in a camp near Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, Peter formally resigned his commission on September 16, 1862. That same day, assistant Regimental surgeon W. B. Morrison wrote from near Fort Ward, Virginia, that Granger “has been suffering from an affection of the lungs, and general debility, as a result of chronic diarrhea, for a period of three months completely unfitting [sic] him for the greater part of the time for the performance of his duties and that justice to his health and family demands that he seek a mode of life accompanied with less exposure. I would therefore recommend his resignation.” His resignation was approved on September 20, 1862.

Although his wife and children apparently remained in Michigan, shortly after his discharge Peter returned to parent's home in Wiscoy, Allegheny County, New York, and indeed was residing in Hume Township, Allegheny County, New York when he applied for and received a pension in March of 1863 (no. 70251).

According to several of his neighbors in New York, by early 1867, Peter’s condition had deteriorated substantially following his discharge from the army. Peter suffered “very poor health and has been totally unfit to work at hard labor on account of lung disease, and that frequently when he has tried to labor for a day or two he would have [a] hemorrhage of the lungs that would lay him up for days and sometimes weeks, and since the first of December 1865” he “has been confined in the house . . . most of the time and has had to have the constant care and attention of another person. . . .”

Peter died from tuberculosis on October 13, 1867, in Wiscoy, Allegheny County, New York, and was buried in Wiscoy cemetery.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 135477). She remarried one Devello Anderson in Saranac in 1870 and in 1871 was a guardian in the minor child pension (no. 146281).

Friday, November 21, 2008

Munson Granger

Munson Granger, also known as "Manson," was born 1845 in Cayuga County, New York, the son of Joseph (b. 1811) and Esther (b. 1811).

New York natives Joseph and Esther were married and settled in New York by 1840 and resided there for some years. Between 1848 and 1855 Joseph settled his family in Michigan, and by 1860 Munson was attending school with his siblings and living on the family farm in Berlin, Ionia County.

Munson stood 5’6” with black eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 19-year-old farmer possibly living in Boston or in Berlin, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on January 27, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Boston, and was mustered the same day; he was possibly related to Peter Granger from Ionia County and who also served in Company D. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

Munson joined the Regiment on March 6 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and probably spent very little if any time with the Regiment. According to George Fargo who also served in Company D and who was also from Ionia County, he wrote home in late February of 1864 “Munson Granger had the measles the next day after he got here and is around again.” Indeed, he was absent sick in the hospital in May, and was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

He remained absent sick until he died of disease on October 10, 23, 25 or 28, 1864, at Alexandria, Virginia, and was buried in Alexandria National Cemetery, although he is also noted as interred in Saranac cemetery: lot 13.

No pension seems to be available.

By 1870 his parents were still living in Berlin, Ionia County.

Thursday, November 20, 2008

Lycurgus E. Granger - updated 01/03/2009

Lycurgus E. Granger was born on November 19, 1839, in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan (according to a statement he made on May 12, 1912, Pension Records, National Archives), probably the son of Thomas A. (1808-1901) and Julia Ann (Hubbard, 1809-1879). Thomas was the older brother of Sylvester Granger (1810-1845) who was married to Matilda Walker (b. 1810).

In 1860 there was one Lyman E. Granger, age 21, working as a carpenter and living at the Eagle Hotel in Grand Rapids (also living at the Eagle was George Nairn who would also join the Third Michigan).

Lycurgus stood 5’6’, with dark eyes and complexion and black hair and was 22 years old and probably living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861.

He was reported to be driving an ambulance from July of 1862 through March of 1863, in June he was with the ammunition train, in July was a guard on the ammunition train, and in August he was AWOL. He apparently lost his right eye at some point in the war, and was transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps on September 14, 1863, probably to the One hundred-forty-fourth company, Second Battalion. He allegedly deserted from the VRC in New York City on December 4, 1863.

Lycurgus eventually returned to Michigan and was possibly living in northern Michigan when he married Eliza Ann Kidd on July 16, 1867, in Bay City, Michigan. They were divorced in 1871 in Chicago.

Eliza claimed in 1907, however that she was not, in fact. the Eliza Granger who was divorced from Lycurgus in 1871 in Chicago. That woman had been married to one Lyman Granger and they had a daughter. She and Lycurgus had no children.

Furthermore this other “Eliza” had remarried her brother-in-law and that she was reportedly a blond while she herself was dark. For his part, Lycurgus claimed in 1907, that his wife had left him in 1868 or 1869. “I never seen her but twice since she left me. The last time I saw her was in 1873. At that time she told me that she had a divorce from me and have always taken it for granted that she was divorced since that time. She informed me that she secured her divorce in Chicago. . . .”

In any case, in 1907 Eliza claimed that Lycurgus was a traveling salesman and that prior to 1873 he left her a number of times while they were living in Rockport, Illinois, and that in the fall of 1873

he went away with the understanding that when he obtained a home for [her] she was to come to him; that he wrote her several months after and said he had brain fever but did not speak of returning home or of his future plans, and she did not from him again until 1875, when he wanted to know if she would live with him again; that she wrote him that she would, but that she would have to bring her mother with her; that he answered stating he would as soon as live in hell as to live with [her] mother, and that she never heard from him since.

Sometime in 1879, Eliza continued, she finally learned of Lycyrgus’ address and “wrote him of her mother’s death, and that she would come and live with him, but never received any answer to [the] letter.”

He was probably residing in Grand Rapids, and in 1867-68 was working as a laborer and living at the Bronson House. In 1868-69 he was employed as a laborer living on Ottawa between Bronson and Lyon Streets. By 1880 he was listed as divorced and working as a traveling salesman and boarding at the John Grant’s hotel in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. He was still living in Grand Rapids in September of 1885 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

By 1888 he was residing at 1083 Michigan Avenue in Detroit, at 976 Michigan Avenue in 1890, and on January 2, 1891, when he transferred to a Detroit Grand Army of the Republic post from Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Grand Rapids.

He received pension no. 736,221, drawing $25.00 in 1912.

He also reportedly resided in Saginaw County for a year and a half and in Saratoga, New York for three years.

By 1899 Lycurgus was working as a salesman and living in Lawton, Van Buren County when he was admitted on March 9, 1899, to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 3281).

Curiously, in a statement Lycurgus gave in 1907, in response to Eliza’ efforts to obtain part of his pension, he declared that he had remarried around 1902 and that his wife was living near the Michigan Soldier’s Home. (According to family historian Tim Stark, Lycurgus had in fact remarried one Rachel P. Fowler, nee Barber, on June 10, 1902, in Grand Rapids.)

Lycurgus died of apoplexy at 3:20 p.m. on Wednesday, May 5, 1915, and was buried in the Home cemetery: section 7 row 4 grave no. 37. He had no known family when he died. (His obituary in the Grand Rapids Press read, in part, that the Home “authorities have no record of any of his relatives.”)

Eliza was living in Chicago when she was allowed one-half of Lycurgus’ pension in December of 1907, and in July of 1915 she was living in Minnesota when she applied for a pension (no. 1049783). However her claim was rejected on the ground that she had obtained a divorce from Lycurgus in 1871.

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

William H. Graham

William H. Graham was born 1828 in Dutchess County, New York.

William’s parents were both born in New York. William left New York State and came to Michigan, eventually settling in Ottawa County. By 1860 William was a farm laborer working for and/or living with Henry Cooley and Joel Lilley, farmers in Tallmadge, Ottawa County.

He stood 5’10” with black eyes, black hair and a dark complexion, and was 33 years old and residing in Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861; he may have been related to Chancey Graham of Company A and/or Robert Graham of Company H. In any case, William was discharged for disability on September 18, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia.

After his discharge from the army William returned to western Michigan and settled for a time in Berlin (Marne), Ottawa County where he worked for many years as a laborer. In 1870 there was a William Graham, age 50, born in New York, who was working as a farm laborer for John Hohen in Marne. By 1880 William was listed as single, and working as a laborer in Berlin, Ottawa County; that same year his brother James was a widower and was also living in Berlin. By June of 1898 he was living in Berlin.

He received pension no. 515,000. He was admitted to Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 429) on November 3, 1886, was living in the Home in 1890, was discharged July 23, 1892, readmitted on October 21, 1892, and discharged December 16, 1892 when he probably went to Marne to stay with his brother James.

William was admitted to the Home for the final time on October 7, 1898, where he died of “La Grippe” (influenza) on January 16, 1899, and was interred in the Home cemetery: section 2 row 6 grave no. 6.

Tuesday, November 18, 2008

William Graham

William Graham was born about 1833, in Warren, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.

William left his home in the east and moved to Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 6’1” with brown eyes and hair and a light complexion, and was a 27-year-old farmer probably living in Lyons, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. (Company E was composed in large part by men from Clinton and Ingham counties, as well as parts of Ionia County.)

In June of 1862 he was reported sick in a hospital in Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, suffering from fever and consumption, was on detached service (probably as a teamster) from October of 1862 through December, and with the Brigade wagon train in January of 1863. In April he was absent sick in a hospital, and on June 9 he left for home on sick furlough. He remained absent sick, probably in Michigan, from July until he was discharged for “chronic eczema with tumefaction [swelling] of the right leg & foot” on November 17, 1863, at Detroit.

William listed Bushnell, Montcalm County as his mailing address on his discharge paper, but was apparently living in Grand Rapids by 1888.

Monday, November 17, 2008

Robert Graham

Robert Graham was born either 1839 or 1843 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, or 1840 in Ontario, Canada.

In 1858 one Robert Graham came to Coopersville, Ottawa County, Michigan, where he was proprietor of the only billiard and “sample room” (saloon). By 1860 there was a 21-year-old mill laborer named Robert Graham (b. in Canada) living with the Heman Leland family in Polkton, Ottawa County.

Robert stood 5’5” with brown eyes and hair, and a light complexion, and was 22 years old and probably residing in Newaygo County or in Polkton when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861; he was possibly related to Chancey Graham of Company A and/or William H. Graham of Company B, all of whom had lived in Ottawa County prior to the war. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

He was absent sick in the hospital in August of 1862, again from April of 1863 through July, and was reportedly slightly wounded in the right thigh in early May of 1864, probably during the various actions at the Wilderness, Virginia. He was mustered out of service on June 20, 1864.

After he left the army Robert returned to Michigan and reentered the service in Hancock’s First Army Corps (a Veterans’ Reserve Corps unit, part of the “Invalid Corps”) on March 20, 1865, at Grand Rapids, for one year. He was discharged upon expiration of his term of service on March 29, 1866, at Washington, DC, when he was a Corporal of Company A, Eighth United States Volunteers.

He eventually returned to Michigan. He may have been the same Robert Graham (age 27 and born in Pennsylvania) who was working as a lumber manufacturer and living with another lumberman, John Johnson in Eastmanville, Polkton, Ottawa County in1870.
In any case, in 1873 he married Margaret Malone (b. 1856), and they had at least one child: Charles (b. 1879).

By 1880 Robert was operating a saloon in Coopersville and living with his wife and child; also living with them was his brother-in-law Thomas Malone. By 1888 he was living in Coopersville, in Polkton in 1890, back in Coopersville by 1897 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and when he applied for and received a pension (no. 1099398), but by 1900 he had moved to Bellingham, Washington.

Robert died on February 13, 1910, in Washington and was presumably buried there.

His widow was living in Washington when in March of 1910 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 706947).

Sunday, November 16, 2008

Kimble Graham

Kimble Graham, also known as "Kimball," was born 1824 in Essex County, New York.

In 1850 there was a 24-year-old engineer named Kimball Graham, born in New York living in Northfield, Summit County, Ohio, with his wife Maria (b. 1823 in Ohio) and their children, all born in Ohio: Otis (b. 1843) and twins William and Mary (7 months old).

Kimble was married to a woman possibly named Pline (b. 1814 in New York), and they had at least three children: Reuben (b. 1843), Orval (b. 1845) and Mary E. (b. 1853).

Kimble and his wife moved to Ohio before 1853 but by 1860 Kimble was working as a farmer and machinist living in Hopkins, Allegan County with his wife and children.

Kimble stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion, and was 37 years old and probably still living in Allegan County or possibly in Georgetown, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

By late August of 1861 Kimble was hospitalized in Annapolis, Maryland, for reasons unknown. On August 21, Kimble wrote to General Mansfield, commanding the hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, complaining about his doctor and seeking a discharge from the army. Doctor Burns, he wrote, “may be a good doctor, [but] as far as I can say about him in that case I can say to you that he keeps men soldiers here two or three weeks and won't fill out their papers for discharge if we ask him to fill out the papers he says I put you in the guardhouse if you don't stop talking.” Graham further claimed that Burns “says I have no authority to make out your papers, you have to get your captain to fill the papers out, and I been examined by the doctors four weeks ago last Monday and he said I can't never be a well man to do duty. . . .”

Graham also complained about the living conditions, that the food was inadequate, that they are confined to the hospital and all they have to eat and drink is “bitter coffee and four ounces bread to eat” and “at noon we have bread and soup and this for dinner.” He thought he should “be discharged soon for I have the [rheumatism] and bunches of blood veins on my legs and disabled for working or running fast if you could send a man here that can help the sick men away it would be a good cause to your soldiers which is suffering here so bad the[re] is a good many here not be able to do duty and it is too bad to keep them so long here suffering so much pain if we buy anything to eat to keep from starving he will put us in the guardhouse and that is the way we are nursed here they all get bread and water to drink that is all we get to in that place to eat.”

He was discharged for chronic rheumatism and varicose veins on October 11, 1861, at Fort Richardson, Virginia.

It is not known if he ever returned to Michigan.

He was probably living in Wisconsin when he married his second (?) wife, Sarah (b. 1829), on April 26, 1869 in Pierce County, Wisconsin. (She had been married once before to a man named Jackson.) By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and stepchildren in Spring Lake, Pierce County, Wisconsin.

In 1873 he applied for and received a pension (no. 568570).

Kimble probably died in about 1886 and probably in Wisconsin.

In any case his widow was living in Wisconsin when she applied for and received a pension (no. 459660).

Saturday, November 15, 2008

Chancey Graham

Chancey Graham was born in 1837.

Chancey (or Chauncey) was possibly living in Spring Lake, Ottawa County, Michigan, when he enlisted at the age of 24 in Company A on May 13, 1861 (he was possibly related to Robert Graham of Company H and/or William H. Graham of Company B, all of whom had resided in Ottawa County before the war).

Daniel Littlefield, also of Company A and a good friend, described Graham’s behavior during the action of July 18, 1861, at Blackburn’s Ford, near Bull Run. “I thought,” wrote Littlefield,

My friend Chancy Graham, who by the way has been to “Pikes Peak” & is the coolest genius you ever saw, found me, soon I hear the command to fire by company & I jumped behind a tree when the bullets whistled by us in every direction tearing the bark off from either side of the trees, we stood behind, as the bullets were ripping by us & knocking the leaves from the trees. Chancy asked me a question that made me laugh, laugh one of our good old hearty laughs. He asked me if I thought it was Providence or bull head luck that kept the bullets from hitting us. I told him it was the trees at present, but if we got off alive it must be by the help of “God.”

On July 26, 1861, another friend from Company A, William Drake, wrote to an acquaintance in Michigan describing how the battle of Bull Run “was regular bush fighting & against a masked battery” and that Graham “lost his hat in the engagement & he'll have wonderful stories to tell when he gets back to old Ottawa -- during the hottest of the fight when musket-balls & cannon balls were flying thick around them, -- his comrade, affected a serio-comic [expression] and asked him ‘[Chancey] are you happy?’ ‘Quite so, but I'm afraid I'll cut in a __ & no whiskey on hand’ said [Chancey] -- there's nothing in the words or the mere expression [‘the mere expression’ is crossed out] -- but those who were on hand say that his expression phisionomically was droll in the extreme -- I saw him after the fight -- met him in the woods -- nary cap on his head -- & his hair like a Dutch mop -- his eyes & nose too very prominent -- I declare I hardly knew him.”

Chancey was reported "absent without authority" in August of 1862, and a deserter as of September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia.

While there is no further record, Chancey reportedly returned Michigan and at one point was living in Coopersville, Ottawa.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

No pension seems to be available.

Friday, November 14, 2008

William Gould

William Gould, also known as “William Wells,” was born August 8, 1846, in Clinton County, Michigan.

William stood 5’5’ with blue eyes, light brown hair and a fair complexion, and was probably the ward of one Anthony Cook and working as a farmer in Westphalia, Clinton County when he became a substitute for Peter Simmonds from Dallas, Clinton County, who was drafted on February 10, 1863, for 9 months.

William was an 18-year-old farm laborer when he enlisted in Company B on February 26, 1863, at Dallas for 3 years, crediting Dallas, and he joined the Regiment on March 10 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia.

His medical records, however show that on or about April 14, 1863 he was treated for intermittent fever, and suffering from dysentery May 8-29. In any case, he was shot in the left hip on May 3, 1863, at the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, and admitted to Harewood hospital in Washington, DC on June 15 He returned to duty on June 16, was admitted to the hospital at the convalescent camp near Alexandria, Virginia on July 10, suffering form enteritis and returned to duty on July 30. He was discharged for consumption on August 6 or September 3, 1863, at Camp Convalescent near Alexandria, Virginia.

He listed Westfield (probably Westphalia), Clinton County as his mailing address on his discharge paper, and William did indeed return to Michigan where he reentered the service as "William Wells" in Company I, Tenth cavalry on August 31, 1863, and was probably mustered into service in Grand Rapids where the regiment was organized between September 18 and November 18, 1863, when it was mustered into service.

The regiment left Michigan for Lexington, Kentucky on December 1, 1863, and participated in numerous operations, mostly in Kentucky and Tennessee throughout the winter of 1863-64. Most of its primary area of operations would eventually be in the vicinity of Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. William was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865.

After the war, William again returned to Michigan, and eventually settle din Saginaw County.

He married New York native wife Mary A. Goodrich (b. 1846-1927), on April 22, 1869, at South Saginaw and they had at least two children: Addie or Ada (b. 1870) and Bertha (b. 1876).

By 1880 William was working as a brick-maker and living with his daughters in Saginaw, Saginaw County. He was still living in Saginaw, Saginaw County by 1890 and in 1891.

In 1880 he applied for and received a pension (no. 448726), drawing $12 per month by 1911.

William died of pneumonia on January 28, 1912, at his home in Spaulding, Saginaw County.

In any case his widow was living in Spaulding, Saginaw County, when she applied in February of 1912 for and received a pension (no. 742693), drawing $30 per month by 1927.

Thursday, November 13, 2008

Perry Goshorn

Perry Goshorn was born December 9, 1832, in Beaver, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, the son of Hugh A. (1797-1853) and Rosina or Rosanna (Law, d. 1837).

Hugh and Rosina were married in Beaver, Pennsylvania on June 6, 1817, and resided in Beaver for many years. Sometime between 1832 and 1836 they left Pennsylvania and moved to Seneca County, Ohio. In 1837 Rosina died, probably in Ohio, possibly in Seneca. In any case, Hugh was probably living in Crawford, Ohio when he married Jane Shira in 1844. Hugh died in Crawford in 1853.

Perry and his older brother James left Ohio, eventually settling in Allegan County in 1849; according to one source they lived briefly in Otsego. By 1860 Perry was a farmer living with James and his wife Margaret in Saugatuck, Newark Township, Allegan County.

Perry stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was 26 years old and living in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. According to one source, he was among the second wave of recruits to come out of Ottawa County and did not in fact enlist until the end of May, along with Albert Hamlin, Calvin Hall, Nelson Davis and David Davis, Joseph Payne, Albert Gardner, James Rhodes, Sylvester Gay, Joseph Soler (Josiah Schuler), Quincy Lamereaux, William Suret and John Ward.

He was shot in the right foot either on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia or on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. Ain any case, as of October 6 he was reported in Presbyterian Church hospital in Georgetown, DC. “The ball,” noted one physician, “which was conical, passed through all the toes fracturing the bones of four of them. The third toe has been amputated. His wounds has [sic] produced a lameness that would interfere with the gait required in a soldier.” He was also shot in the right thigh. Perry remained hospitalized until he was discharged on November 18, 1862, at Presbyterian Church hospital in Georgetown.

After his discharge from the army Perry returned to Saugatuck, where he was living when he married Ohio native Caroline “Carrie” E. Welch (1846-1870) on December 7, 1862, in Gaines, Kent County; the witnesses were Andrew and Elmira Welch. They had at least two children: Edwin (b. 1866) and Caroline “Carrie” (b. 1871).

In 1864 Perry reportedly purchased part of James’ farm on Goshorn Lake and soon afterwards built a house on Bee Line road. By 1870 Perry was working as a farmer and living with his wife and son in Saugatuck; Carrie died later that year. Perry married Clarissa Welch (1841-1900), who was possibly Carrie’s older sister, on April 29, 1874, in Dutton, Michigan, and they had at least two children: Hattie (b. 1876) and Kate (b. 1878).

Perry was still living in Saugatuck in 1880 where he was working as a farmer and residing with his second wife and children. He was still living in Saugatuck in 1883 drawing $4.00 per month for a wounded right thigh (pension no. 18,068, dated 1863), and in 1889 and in 1894; he probably lived in Saugatuck most if not all of his life.

Perry died of paralysis in Saugatuck on September 29, 1895, and was buried in Riverside cemetery, Saugatuck.

In 1896 his widow Clarissa applied for and received a pension (no. 443092), drawing $8 per month by 1900.

Wednesday, November 12, 2008

Charles T. Goodell

Charles T. Goodell was born 1837 in Cayuga, New York, the son of Charles (1805-1881) and Betsey (Wheeler, b. 1807).

Vermonter Charles married Conquest, New York native Betsey in Conquest, New York in 1830 (he was reportedly living in Conquest in 1830) and by 1832 had settled in New York. Charles (elder) was living in Sterling, Cayuga County in 1840. By 1850 Charles was attending school with his siblings and living with his family on a farmer in Conquest, Cayuga County. In any case Charles left New York before the war broke out and moved westward, eventually settling in central Michigan. (His older brother Edward or Edwin was probably living in Tuscola County in 1860.)

He stood 6’1” with gray eyes, black hair and a black complexion, and was a 24-year-old farmer probably living in Tuscola County when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Dayton, Tuscola County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Charles was killed in action on May 5, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, although he is reportedly buried at Seven Pines National Cemetery, near Richmond.

No pension seems to be available.

His father was living in Dayton, Tuscola County in 1880 and reportedly in Tuscola County the following year.

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” Gooch - updated 11/28/11

Benjamin Franklin “Frank” Gooch was born March 20, 1831, in Machias, Washington County, Maine, the son of Benjamin (b. 1786) and Lucy (Boyington, d. 1834).

In 1834 Benjamin Sr. and his family left Maine. He and Lucy set out with their nine children traveling westward on the Erie Canal, “and while in the immediate vicinity of Rochester, in the middle of the night, the wife and mother rose from her berth, made her way to the deck, and as the watchman observed her she suddenly walked overboard and sunk from sight. The watchman roused the occupants of the boat and in half an hour her lifeless body was rescued from the cold waters. Every effort at resuscitation was made, but in vain, and she was buried in the beautiful cemetery of Mount Hope, in the southern suburb of the city of Rochester, and the bereaved family pursued their sad journey to their destination.” Benjamin “had disposed of all his business interests on leaving . . . and the money realized -- all in gold -- was in a belt clasped around the body of the wife, and was the means of her death, as its weight prevented her from rising to the surface.”

Soon afterwards the family settled in Wayne County, Michigan where Benjamin Sr. met and married Phebe Sherman; they had four children. In 1843 they moved to Kent County on the western side of the state where Ben Sr. died of smallpox (sometime after 1850 presumably). Phebe died in 1847 in Plymouth, Wayne County. Ben Jr. was described as

A level-headed boy, having a well-balanced temperament, formed of the excellent traits of a mixed Scotch and English ancestry, the former predominating and descending to him in the maternal line. The element of active effort is his leading characteristic and has marked all his life. He is an embodiment of the principle of doing a duty himself instead of delegating what needs to be done to the chance ogf a transferred duty. His education consisted chiefly of a comprehensive knowledge of Daboll’s Arithmetic, obtained by resolute braving of the wintry winds daily a distance of nearly two miles, where he was a pupil in a log school-house with horizontal windows, stone fireplace, “stick” chimney and slab seats. But in this instance, as in thousands of others, the achievements of Mr. Gooch attest the value of rugged training and lack of the effeminating appurtances of the life of today, which fosters weakness and extracts the vigor and fire from the human composition.

While still a young man Ben’s father was engaged by a Mr. Randolph to transport a load of stoves to Lansing, Ingham County, where the new state capital had been created, and Benjamin went along to help. “Mr. Randolph gave [Ben Jr.] in addition a quantity of cast-iron boot-jacks to peddle in the city on commission, which he did, and sold them when there was not a painted building in the place. All finishing material had to be drawn from Detroit with teams, and the people waited for the advent of winter and snow in order to facilitate transportation of heavy merchandise.” By 1850 Benjamin (elder) was working for a farmer named John Cotton in Alpine, Kent County, Michigan.

Two years after his stepmother died Ben moved to Virginia “where he worked by the month in a steam saw and grist mill, and also aided in the management of a carding machine. He operated in that capacity until 1853, when he returned to Michigan and engaged as a farm assistant and as a lumberman in the woods near Grand Rapids.” Sometime in the fall of 1855, Ben along with three other men driving an ox team,

proceeded to the northern extremity of the thoroughfare in Mecosta County, to a point four miles north of the present city of Big Rapids, when the site of the plucky and prosperous city was not marked by a single structure. On the fifth day of September he began cutting a road northward into the wilderness, crossing the boundary of Mecosta County into Osceola County on the 14th day of the same month. This was the first wagon road in Osceola County. A few settlers had come the previous spring, and had utilized the water routes, coming hither by means of canoes on the Muskegon [river], the general method of travel in Northern Michigan previous to the day of railroads and State thoroughfares. The line of road constructed by Mr. Gooch extended to Cat Creek, a distance of 16 miles. The party was joined by Delos A. Blodgett, who made a permanent settlement and became inseparably connected with the development of Osceola County, but who removed to Grand Rapids. . . . Nicholas Rescoe also came with them.

In late November of 1855 Ben hired a Mr. and Mrs. Dildine and their 11-year-old daughter at Grand Rapids and brought them to Cat Creek. That same winter he “shot a large number of deer and a lynx” as well as six wolves. By virtue of living on the frontier, “the exigencies of the time in which he became a resident of Northern Michigan developed his abilities as a hunter, and he [shot] deer in the counties of Kent, Newaygo, Mecosta, Osceola, Missaukee and Clare.”

That winter Ben worked as a foreman for a logging party and lumber camp. In the spring of 1856 he acquired some 160 acres of government land in what would eventually become Richland Township, Osceola County, and where he continued to live for many years; he eventually added 40 more acres. “He made a small clearing on his original purchase, built a log shanty and entered with characteristic vigor and energy into the work of clearing his farm.”

In the spring of 1857 he set out 100 apple-trees on his farm, which he bought from John Foxbury, of Walker Township [Kent County], and drew from Grand Rapids with an ox-team, a distance of 75 miles, as the road was constructed. . . . When these trees were planted the ground was still the resort of deer, wolves and foxes. The orchard scheme of Mr. Gooch was the source of much comment among the farmers of Grand Rapids and vicinity, as it was firmly believed that apples could not be raised so far north as Osceola County. He was told by one distinguished gentleman that some of his trees would live and blossom on the southern side and perhaps one or two apples might mature on the south side at the core, but the severity of the climate would prevent the sap circulating all around the apple. The apple crop of the orchard in 1884 is 400 bushels. The fact is, the fruit is more perfect and hardy than in regions farther south.

Benjamin also became well known for his faculty as a “pedestrian.” According to one story in the fall of 1857 he became troubled by a decayed tooth. Seeking to relieve the suffering himself he applied the only available instrument, “an old fashioned pair of turnkeys and on their application to the tooth it was crushed proving only an aggravation of the difficulty. Mr. Gooch retired with a determination to endure the suffering, but it proved too much for his endurance, and he arose before morning and started afoot for Grand Rapids, walking the entire distance to that city, where he procured the services of L. D. Rogers. . . . Traversing the distance from Richland Township to Grand Rapids in those early days was a common practice with Mr. Gooch, who has preserved no record of the number of times he has made the trip -- ‘hundreds of times’.”

By 1860 Benjamin was living in Greene Township, Osceola County (he owned $1000 worth of real estate); two farms away lived the Robbins family. Frank Robbins would also join the 3rd Michigan.

Benjamin also donated the land in Richland Township for the first schoolhouse -- which was built on the northwest quarter of section 24. Ben served as Highway Commissioner for the entire County “which was then attached for municipal purposes to Mecosta County, and known as Green Township.” In the spring of 1861, when Richland Township was formally organized he was elected Town Treasurer, Justice of the Peace and School Inspector. He was also one of the judges of election.

Benjamin stood 5’8” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was 30 years old and probably living in Big Rapids, Mecosta County, when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. The regiment left Grand Rapids for Washington on June 13, 1861, and arrived at their first encampment in the east at Chain Bridge along the Potomac on Sunday afternoon. According to a story he told years later, “when foraging in the corn and potato fields beyond the lines of Union pickets, the party was discovered by rebels, who sent a shell into the field they had just left. No one was injured, but they returned to gather the potatoes dug by the missile, which they ate with a grim relish, in consideration of the murderous intent which failed of its purpose and added to their stores.”

According to Benjamin he was wounded four times during his service in the war. He was first shot in the right arm and struck in the right shoulder by a shell fragment at the Battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, on May 31, 1862, but apparently the injuries were not serious and he remained in the ranks. According to information he gave after the war, at Fair Oaks he was shot through the biceps of the right arm “compelling me to carry my arm in a sling 16 days, and a fragment of a shell cut and burned the right shoulder blade.”

He was Color Corporal during the battle of Second Bull Run on August 29, 1862, and was wounded by a gunshot in the right thigh, and reportedly spent some two months in the hospital. Indeed, in 1865, Edwin S. Pierce, former Captain of Company F, stated that Ben was indeed the Color Bearer and saw him fall and carry the colors off the field.

By early September of 1862 he was reported as a patient in Cliffburne Hospital in Washington, DC, and according to a statement given by Dr. Louis Yerkes in 1907, “as a result of the second wound [on August 29, 1862] in the right calf he was confined to the hospital at Bull Run for some time, and then transferred to Washington and from there to Philadelphia, and recovered from the wound in November following. . . .” While in Philadelphia he was possibly a patient in Odd Fellows Hall hospital on Fifth Street, and was a Corporal detached on recruiting service from September 22, 1862, through April of 1863. (Later Ben reported that he remained in Philadelphia “until sometime in November, then was ordered home to Grand Rapids, Michigan, on recruiting service.”

He rejoined the Regiment probably sometime in April, and was possibly wounded slightly on May 3, 1863, during the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia (he was reported absent wounded in a hospital during the month of May).

Ben remained on recruiting duty in Michigan from late November of December of 1862 through the end of April of 1863.

He soon rejoined the Regiment, however, and was apparently wounded in the calf of his right leg on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. “This injury was so severe as to cause him to be sent to the hospital, and his life was seriously imperiled by the appearance of gangrene in the wound, and from which he remained eight months in the hospital.” Indeed, he was subsequently hospitalized during August and September, and in October was absent sick in the general hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from wounds received at Gettysburg. Again, according to Dr. Yerkes, “as a result of the wound in the right calf he was confined to the Baltimore hospital, and from there transferred to [a hospital in West] Philadelphia; that while in the hospital the said wound on the right calf developed gangrene, necrosis and septicemia at three different times and the wound did not heal until the Spring of 1864. . . .” In any event, he remained absent wounded in the hospital until he was mustered out of the service on June 20 or 21, 1864.

After he was discharged Benjamin returned to his farm in Richland, Osceola County, and in the spring of 1865 he was elected Supervisor of Richland Township, “which then comprised the entire County.

He married New Hampshire native Desdemona Harrington (1831-1895), on October 17, 1865, in Ionia, Ionia County, and they had one child, an adopted daughter Sylvia E. (b. 1868, Mrs. Thomas Kincade).

Desdemona, who was born in New Hampshire, moved to the vicinity of Grand Rapids with her parents in 1838. (By 1860 she was living with her parents in Walker, Kent County.)

There were no district schools in those days in that region, and she was taught at home with her younger sister and brother by an elder sister who had been educated in the East. Before she was 16 she had read Rollins’ Ancient History and Josephus, besides Scott’s and Byron’s poems, and worse yet Young’s Night Thoughts, Milton’s Paradise Lost and other similar productions. Her mind did not give way however, as might be supposed. She didn’t even die, but came very near it; was very sick for more than a year, and was only saved by a kind mother’s intelligent care.

She went to Grand Rapids which had grown somewhat, and attended Prof. Everett’s Academy. The professor was a man of gigantic intellect, and she nearly worshipped him for his knowledge.

Mrs. Everett taught the female department, was remarkably sweet-tempered and agreeable, as gentle and considerate as a kind mother to all her pupils. Both of them understood making learning a delight, and she loved them both. . . . She left the academy to teach a district school, but returned again in company with her younger sister, after which she taught the village school of Newaygo a year, rode thither from home, a distance of 36 miles, on horseback (no stagecoach nor railroad from Grand Rapids to Newaygo then) -- rode a vicious black horse belonging to Benj. Wright, who then carried the weekly mail between the two places. Nearly every foot of the road led through dense, primeval forest, but she enjoyed its gloomy grandeur, also the spirited paces of the horse. He would pace, trot or gallop, at the behest of his rider. And here let it be stated, the same horse carried home the teacher in addition to the weight of the mail bags, when the school term was done. Then she attended the union school on the east side [of the Grand River] one term to study French and the higher mathematics. She also taught one term in the same school while Rev. James Ballard was Principal. . . . Afterwards she taught two years in succession in the upper department of the same school when Prof. Chesebro was Principal. Her health began to fail [and she] went home to rest, then taught at the village school of Laphamville (now Rockford) several terms, after which she taught the winter term of school in 1860-61 in Big Rapids. She returned home and commenced the study of medicine with Dr. Henderson of Grand Rapids. [She] helped run a soldier’s aid society during the war of the Rebellion (being Secretary of the same) and continued teaching off and on till the close of the war.

In the fall of 1866 he was elected Surveyor of the territory of Osceola and Mecosta, then included in one County, and held the position two years.” He also served as Superintendent of the Poor, several terms as Justice of the Peace and as a director of the County fair. He also served as a director of the Farmers’ Mutual Insurance Company of Osceola, Lake and Wexford Counties.

By 1870 Benjamin was working as a farmer (he owned some $10,000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife in Hersey, Richmond Township, Osceola County. (Also living with them was one Phebe Harrington, Desdemona’s mother.)

He was residing near Hersey in 1876, and in fact he lived in the Hersey area for many years. (Probably because Hersey had the nearest post office.) And working as a farmer and living with his family in Richmond, Osceola County in 1880. In 1883 he was listed as living in Hersey and drawing $4.00 for a wounded right thigh (pension no. 51,704).

On September 28, 1898, Benjamin married Canadian-born Caroline McCall Yerkes (1840-1922), in Richmond Township. Her husband Herman Yerkes died in 1893, in Hersey. By 1898 Benjamin had apparently moved to Reed City.

He was a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association, of Grand Army of the Republic Bagley Post No. 97 in Hersey, was a Republican in political conviction, a member of the Masons and belonged to the “Old Settlers Union” in Mecosta County.

Benjamin died of heart disease on July 5, 1904, in Richmond, Osceola County and was reportedly buried in Hersey cemetery, Osceola County (his first wife Desdemona died in Hersey). Two of his brothers are probably buried in Everett cemetery, in Newaygo County.

His widow Caroline received a pension (no. 828453). By 1916 she was living with her daughter, Mrs. Bertha Aldrich and her family at 1617 Washington Boulevard. in Chicago, Illinois.

Monday, November 10, 2008

William Henry Harrison Goff

William Henry Harrison Goff was born July 19, 1844, in Carlisle, Lorain County, Ohio, the son of Albert C. (b. 1821) and Eunice (Pangborn, 1828-1860).

Albert and Eunice were both born in New York or Vermont and married in 1842 in Ferrisburgh, Addison County, Vermont. By 1844 they had settled in Ohio and by 1850 were still living in Elyria, Ohio. By 1855 Albert had settled his family in Michigan and in 1860 William was attending school with two of his younger siblings and living with his family on a farm in Grand Rapids, Kent County, where William also worked as a farm laborer.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was an 18-year-old farmer possibly living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A on August 8, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day; and he was possibly related to John Goff of Company B. (Albert, his father, was living in Grand Rapids in 1862.) He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, was apparently admitted to McDougal hospital in Washington, DC, on January 9, 1863, and was still in the hospital when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He remained hospitalized until he was mustered out on May 31, 1865.

After the war William eventually returned to Michigan. He was married to Pennsylvania native Amy L. (b. 1846) on September 24, 1871, in Otsego, Allegan County; they were divorced in 1885. He was possibly residing in Grand Rapids in 1874. In any case, by 1880 he had moved to Wexford County and was working as a bookkeeper and living with his wife Amy in Cadillac; also living with them was one Mary A. Wheeler, listed as “Mother.” He was still living in Cadillac in 1882, and in 1883, drawing $13.00 per for deafness (pension no. 87,118).

He was still living in Cadillac in 1890 and suffering from complete deafness, and was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. (He may have been the same civil war veteran named William H. Goff who was living in Volinia, Cass County in 1894.)

According to his father Albert, William left his home in Cadillac, Michigan and went on a visit to Otsego, Allegan County and was taken seriously ill and lived only a few days. William died of disease on January 20, 1891, probably in the vicinity of Reynolds Township, Montcalm County, although his father claimed that his remains were removed to Ensley, Newaygo County for burial in fact he was buried in Reynolds Township cemetery where there is a government headstone for William; see photo G-502.

His father was possibly living in Gilman, Iroquois County, Illinois by 1897. His application for a dependent father’s pension was rejected.

Sunday, November 09, 2008

John Goff

John Goff, also known as “Gaff,” was born 1843 in Noble County, Indiana, the son of Robert (b. 1793) and Mary (b. 1802).

Pennsylvania natives Robert and Mary were married sometime before 1825 when they were living in Ohio. They resided in Ohio for some years and were quite possibly living in Columbia, Meigs County, Ohio in 1840. In any case, between 1838 and 1843 moved to Indiana. By 1850 John was attending school with his siblings and living with on the family farm in Washington, Noble County, Indiana. John eventually left Indiana and came to Michigan sometime before February of 1863.

According to one source John enlisted as a private on November 22, 1861, in Company G, Forty-fourth Indiana infantry, and was mustered in the same day. He allegedly deserted on October 7, 1862.

In any case, John stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 20-year-old farm laborer possibly living in Maple Grove, Barry County when he enlisted in Company B on February 26, 1863, at Maple Grove for 3 years, and was mustered the same day at Detroit (he was possibly related to William Goff of Company A); he may in fact have been a substitute for one Porter M. Harvard or possibly Harwood, who had been drafted March 10, 1863, for 9 months from Maple Grove.

Interestingly, John enlisted with another Noble County resident, John Winebrenner – although Winebrenner was put into Company D – and they both credited Maple Grove, Barry County.

John joined the Regiment on March 10 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, was a provost guard in Division headquarters from September 21 through October of 1863, and was wounded slightly in the hand in early May of 1864. His friend John Winebrenner wrote home to his own mother on June 19 that John had in fact been wounded in the hand on May 1 at the Wilderness.

In any case, John was subsequently hospitalized and remained absent in the hospital when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was apparently admitted from the general hospital in Baltimore, Maryland to Camp Parole hospital at Annapolis, Maryland on June 21, 1864. (There is however no record of his being taken prisoner and subsequently paroled, so how and why he came to be at Camp Parole in Maryland remains a mystery.) He was quite possibly promoted to Sergeant. (In later years he claimed to have served in the Forty-fourth Independent Infantry.) In any case, John remained absent sick until he was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is not known if he returned to Michigan. He did, apparently, return to his family home in Indiana.

John was probably married to Sarah (b. 1850), and they had at least six children: Freling W. (b. 1867), Melissa (b. 1868), Winnie (b. 1870), Callie (b. 1871), Howard (b. 1873) and Arlo (b. 1877).

By 1880 John “Gaff was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Green, Noble County, Indiana and he was in Green, Indiana in 1889. In 1902 John was living in Churubrusco, Indiana, when he testified in the pension application of Barnet Hopkins.

In 1880 John applied for and received a pension (no. 357881).

John died on November 6, 1917, in Indiana, and was presumably buried there.

Saturday, November 08, 2008

Edwin R. Goble

Edwin R. Goble was born 1838 in New York, the son of Hiram (b. 1807) and Rossanna (b. 1817).

His parents were both New York natives and quite possibly married in that state sometime before 1834. In any case, the family moved from New York to Michigan sometime after 1847, and by 1850 Edwin was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Almena, Van Buren County, where his father was a farmer. In 1860 Edwin was working as a sawyer and living with his parents in Almena.

Edwin was 23 years old and probably living in Saugatuck, Allegan County when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. He was shot in the arm on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and subsequently admitted to the Fifth Street hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he died from his wounds on June 24, 1862. He was buried the same day in the Philadelphia National Cemetery: section B, grave 69 (originally lot 77, grave 1).

No pension seems to be available. See photo P-349.

His parents were still living in Almena in 1870.

Friday, November 07, 2008

William H. H. Gloyd

William H. H. Gloyd was born in 1842 in New York, probably the son of Rebecca (b. 1805).

By 1850 William was living with his (widowed?) mother and two sisters in Fulton, Oswego County, New York. By 1860 William was working as a laborer and living with a sawyer named Otis Gilmore in Henry, Marshall County, Illinois. William, whose full name was probably William Henry Harrison Gloyd, had probably just arrived in Grand Rapids from Marshall County, Illinois, around the time the war broke out.

William stood 5’10” with black eyes, black hair and a dark complexion, and was 29 years old, married and a farmer possibly living in Grand Rapids or in Polkton, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Vergennes, Kent County, and was absent on veteran’s furlough for thirty-five days from December 29. He probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. William was shot in the left leg on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and on May 12 was admitted to Mt. Pleasant general hospital in Washington, DC, with a “gunshot wound to the left thigh.” (His mother was living in Galena, Illinois, at the time he was admitted to the hospital.)

He was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out as a Sergeant on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is not known if William ever returned to Michigan. In fact he probably eventually returned to his home in Marshall County, Illinois and was probably the same William Gloyd, born about 1842 in New York, working as a plasterer and living with the Alex McKenzie family in Henry, Marshall County, Illinois; also living with them is Rebecca Gloyd, born about 1805 in Canada.

William eventually settled in Missouri. He married Iowa native (?) Sarah J. “Jennie” Bingaman (b. 1846), on November 21, 1877, in Bloomfield, Davis County, Iowa, and they probably had at least three children: Harry (b. 1878), Hiram Wallace (b. 1879) and William Morris (1881-1882).

By 1880 William was working as a locomotive engineer and living with his wife and their two sons in Moberly, Randolph County, Missouri.

In 1882 William was living in Missouri when he applied for and received a pension (no. 257427).

William died of consumption on June 1, 1883, probably in Missouri, and is presumably buried there.

In June of 1883 his widow Sarah J. was living in Scott County, Kansas when she applied for and received a pension (no. 208770). In 1889, having remarried John Richards, she applied in Missouri on behalf of a minor child and eventually received a pension (no. 281344). After John died in 1898 she then married Benton Sellman who died in 1914. She was living in Washington State when she reapplied for a reinstatement of her pension in 1916.

Thursday, November 06, 2008

Lafayette Gleason

Lafayette Gleason was born in 1825.

In 1860 there was a 29-year-old New York-born farmer named Lafayette Gleason, living with his wife New York native Emily (b. 1835), in Angelica, Allegheny County, New York. (Lafayette was working as a farmer and living with his wife Emily in Alfred Center, Angelica, Allegheny County, New York; also living with them is a schoolteacher named Mary Petty (b. 1850); he and Emily were still living in Angelica in 1880.)

Lafayette may have been the same Lafayette Gleason, age 37, who enlisted on August 11, 1862, in Company K, One hundred fifty-seventh New York infantry as a private, at Cortlandville, New York and was mustered on September 19. He was wounded on May 2, 1863, and subsequently transferred to the Veteran’s Reserve Corp on September 1.

In any case, Lafayette stood 5’9” with gray eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion, and was a 39-year-old farmer possibly living in Girard, Branch County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Unassigned on March 25, 1864, for 3 years, crediting Girard, and was mustered on March 26 at Detroit.

In fact, Lafayette never joined the Third Michigan infantry but was transferred to Company L, Third Michigan cavalry at Detroit on March 25, 1864, and mustered the following day. He joined the Regiment at DeVall’s Bluff, near Little Rock, Arkansas on June 18. He was discharged for disability at Jefferson Barracks, St. Louis, Missouri on December 5, 1864.

It is not known if Lafayette ever returned to Michigan.

Lafayette was married to Catharine.

In February of 1864 he applied for and received a pension (no. 184182).

He probably died in New York in 1896.

In any case his widow Catharine was living in New York in 1896 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 459673).

She may have been the same Catherine Gleason (b. 1841 in Ireland), listed as a widow and head of the household living in Albany, Albany County, New York in 1900. Also living with her is a stepson Daniel (b. 1876 in New York) whose parents were both born in Ireland.

Wednesday, November 05, 2008

David M. Gitchel

David M. Gitchel was born January 21, 1837, in Hayfield (or perhaps Hatfield, Bucks County), Pennsylvania, the son of “Squire” Levi (1811-1892) and Louisa (1817-1897).

“Squire” was born in New York and married Connecticut native Louisa sometime before 1837 when they were living in Pennsylvania. Between 1845 and 1847 David’s family moved from Pennsylvania intending to go to Wisconsin, but instead, they settled in Jamestown, Ottawa County sometime around late 1846 or early 1847 (his father was appointed the first postmaster in Jamestown in 1857). They were still living in Jamestown in 1850 and in 1860.

David was 24 years old and living in Jamestown when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

He died of measles on July 12, 1861, at Georgetown, DC. On Friday, July 12 Frank Siverd wrote to the Republican “Another poor fellow has laid down his armor and taken up his long unknown march that must be the fate of all of us. Though moving orders are anxiously awaited, when it comes in this form, though but one of us may receive his sealed orders, it casts a shade of gloom and sorrow throughout the entire camp. He was a member of Co. I, of Georgetown, Ottawa Co -- He was buried with military honors along side his late companion in arms.” Siverd probably refers to his burial near William Choates who had recently died and was buried at Chain Bridge, near Georgetown.

According to another Third Michigan trooper, David was buried at or near the regiment’s camp near Chain Bridge. It is possible that Gitchel’s remains were disinterred and returned home for reburial in Jamestown cemetery, Ottawa County. His name in found on the family headstone in Jamestown cemetery.

His parents were still living on a farm in Jamestown in 1870 and 1880, and in fact would live the rest of their lives in Jamestown. In 1881 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 303282).

Tuesday, November 04, 2008

George Girdler

George Girdler, also known as “Gerdler,” was born 1840 in Massachusetts, the son of William (b. 1810) and Nathalie or Natha or Martha (b. 1818).

Massachusetts native William and French-born Nathalie were probably married in Massachusetts and they settled in Michigan sometime before 1847 when their son Benjamin was born. William moved his family to Grand Rapids area around 1853, and by 1860 George was a farm laborer living on the family farm in Walker, Kent County.

George was 21 years old and still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia. He was buried in Seven Pines National Cemetery: section B, grave 154.

His parents were still living in Walker in 1870. In 1887 his mother “Nathalie” was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 244405?). His widowed mother (?), Martha or “Matty,” was living at 180 Fifth Street, Grand Rapids Seventh Ward in 1890.

Monday, November 03, 2008

Amos Watson Gillot

Amos Watson Gillot, also known as “Gillett,” born 1844 in Michigan, the son of Amos (b. 1820) and Hannah (b. 1821).

Both New York natives his parents were probably married in New York but eventually moved westward and moved to Michigan sometime before 1844, probably settling in Washtenaw County by 1845. By 1850 Amos and his sister Phebe were attending school and living with their other sister Theresa and their father -- who was working as a blacksmith -- and all were living with the Charles Sandford family on a farm in Freedom, Washtenaw County. By 1860 Amos (the younger) was working as a blacksmith with his father and living with his family in North Plains, Ionia County.

Amos was 17 years old and residing in Ionia or Clinton County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) He died of “congestion of the brain” on September 20, 1861, at Fort Richardson, Virginia.

On September 20 Alexander Morton of Company D wrote home from Fort Richardson to his sister and brother mentioning Amos Gillot’s death among other bits of news.

I received your letter this afternoon, while I was sitting by the corpse of one of the boys of our company, he died this morning. The doctor said he had the inflammation on the brain; it was a very sudden death. The boys are going to have a tombstone for to mark the spot where he is laid to rest. He came from Fish Crick.

On September 30, Frank Siverd of Company G described the funeral in a letter to the editor of the Lansing Republican.

Another of those sad scenes [wrote Siverd] that cast a shade over the light hearted, jovial, free and easy manners of the camp occurred last week. A. M. Gillett [sic], of Company D, Ionia Co., died after a painful illness of only twelve hours. A sad procession was that that passed through the lines, with muffled drums and slow and measured tread. There was no funeral service read, there being no Chaplain at the post, but Captain Houghton [of Company D] delivered a short eulogy over the remains of the deceased. His comrades performed the last sad duty by firing a salute over the grave. His grave is a fit resting place for one who gave his life to his country. From the Fort on the hill top, dark, angry looking columbiads will look frowningly upon any enemy that dares molest the resting place of the honored dead, while its secluded position will prevent the spot being the scene of any future conflict of arms, and the sighing of the winds through the pines that surrounded his grave will sing unto his memory a lasting requiem.

According to one report members of his company “purchased tombstones to mark his last resting place.” It is presumed that his remains lie somewhere near present-day Arlington Heights or he may be one of the unknown soldiers reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.

His father apparently enlisted on November 15, 1861, for three years, as a private in Company F, Thirteenth Michigan infantry and was mustered in on January 17, 1862. He was discharged on July 16, 1865, at Savannah, Georgia. He received a pension (no. 244204), as did his widow, Hannah (no. 692,052).

Sunday, November 02, 2008

Malcolm J. Gillis

Malcolm J. Gillis was born in 1839.

Malcolm was 22 years old and probably living in Muskegon County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.)

He died of disease on August 5, 1861, at Georgetown, DC, and was presumably buried in Georgetown or possibly at the Military Asylum cemetery near the Soldier’s Home in Washington, DC (although there is no record of his burial there).

No pension seems to be available.

Saturday, November 01, 2008

James S. Gillespie

James S. Gillespie was born September 4, 1825 in Argyle, Washington County, New York.

James’ father was born in New York and his mother in Scotland.

James was married to New York native Caroline F. Scranton (b. 1833), on the evening of January 12, 1857, in Romeo, Macomb County, Michigan, and they had at least five children: James R. (b. 1857), Nellie (b. 1860), Jennie (b. 1861), Cornelius (b. 1866) and Grace (b. 1869). (Caroline was living in Washington, Macomb County in 1850.)

By 1860 James was working as a register’s clerk living in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward and living with his wife and children.

He stood 5’6,” with blue eyes, auburn hair and a light complexion and was 35 years old and probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted as a wagoner in Company A on May 13, 1861. James was discharged on account of chronic diarrhea and consumption on June 20, 1862, at Savage Station, Virginia.

After he was discharged from the army James returned to Grand Rapids where, on December 10, 1862, he probably applied for a pension (no. 13995).

However, he reentered the service as Private in Company H, Twenty-seventh Michigan infantry on March 10, 1863, for 3 years, and was mustered on April 10 at Ypsilanti, Washtenaw County, where the regiment was organized. The Twenty-seventh left Michigan for Kentucky on April 12 and participated in the siege and capture of Vicksburg and Jackson, Mississippi during the summer and the Knoxville campaign in November-December.

James was detached to Brigade headquarters from November 1, 1863, through June of 1864 -- the regiment had been transferred to the Army of the Potomac in April of 1864 -- and again from March of 1865 through May. He was mustered out with the regiment on July 26, 1865, at Delaney House, DC.

After the war James eventually returned to Michigan. He was apparently living in Corunna, Shiawassee County in 1867.By 1877 he was living in Caro, Tuscola County.

In any case, he was working as a copying clerk and living with his wife and children in the village of Mt. Clemens, Macomb County. By 1880 he was working as a real estate agent and living with his wife and children in Caro, Tuscola County. In 1883 he was living in Caro drawing $8.00 per month for chronic diarrhea (pension no. 13,995, dated March of 1879), drawing $30 by 1912. He was still living in Caro in 1890 and 1894 and around 1900. By 1912 he was living at 1532 N. Anderson Street in Tacoma, Pierce County, Washington.

James was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

He died in about 1913, probably in Tacoma and if so is presumably buried there.

In 1913 (?) his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 759529).