Saturday, January 31, 2009

John Hebeleiter

John Hebeleiter was born in 1821 in Munich, Germany or in Austria.

John immigrated to America sometime before the war broke out and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’5” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion, and was a 40-year-old wagon-maker probably living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He was wounded on or about July 18, 1861, during the action at Blackburn’s Ford, and discharged for chronic rheumatism and general debility on January 4, 1862, at Camp Michigan, Virginia.

In 1863 he applied for and received a pension (no. 18898).

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 687743).

Friday, January 30, 2009

James Hayward

James Hayward was born in 1819, in 1822 or possibly on August 14, 1821, in New York.

James was married to Scottish immigrant Jane (b. 1829) and they had at least three children: James W. (b. 1854), Marguerette (b. 1858) and Charles (b. 1860). They probably moved to Ohio, presumably from New York, sometime before 1854, then to Michigan between 1854 and 1858. By 1860 James was working as a shingle-maker living with his family in Nelson, Kent County. (In 1860 there was a deaf farm laborer named Amherst Hayward living with the Bioce (?) family in Ionia, Ionia County.)

James was 39 years old and probably residing in Ionia County when he enlisted as a Musician in Company K on May 13, 1861. He allegedly deserted on July 23, 1861, at Arlington, Virginia.

There is no further record, and no pension seems to be available.

However, James may have been the same James C. Hayward who enlisted in Company F, Sixth Michigan cavalry on September 8, 1862, at Nelson for 3 years, crediting Nelson, and was mustered on October 13 at Grand Rapids where the regiment was being organized. The Sixth remained on duty at Grand Rapids until December 10 when it left for Washington where it participated in the defenses of the capital. If so, he also served in Company K as well as in Company H, First Michigan cavalry, and was discharged for disability on April 1, 1863.

James may have reentered the service a second time in the Fifteenth Michigan infantry, although this remains unclear.

The James Hayward who served in the Sixth Michigan cavalry eventually returned to Michigan and was living there in 1880 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 291775). This was probably the James Hayward who was working as a farmer and living with his wife Jane and son Charles in Richland, Montcalm County in 1880. By 1890 the James Hayward who had served in the Sixth Michigan cavalry was living in Home, Montcalm County. According to one source he died on June 1, 1905 and was buried in Vinewood cemetery, Edmore, Montcalm County.

Thursday, January 29, 2009

Albert Hayes

Albert Hayes was born in 1835 in Wales, Erie County, New York.

Sometime before the war broke out Albert left New York and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan, where he found work as a lumberman in Ottawa County. By 1860 Albert was working as a mill hand and living at the Paddock boarding house in Georgetown, Ottawa County, along with: John Finch (Company I), Joseph Ledbeter (Company B), Ben Parker (Company I), James Parm (Company I), Thomas Rowling (Company I), Alfred Tate (Company F) and William Tate (Company I), John M. Taylor (Company I).

He stood 5’11” with blue eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion and was a 26-year-old lumberman probably living and working in Georgetown, Ottawa County when he enlisted as Fourth Sergeant in Company I on May 13, 1861; Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County. For reasons unknown, he was hospitalized on May 28, 1862, and by late June he was sick in a hospital in Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, suffering from debility and exposure. On July 6 he arrived at the hospital at Fortress Monroe aboard the transport Knickerbocker, and by early August, he had been transferred again, this time to the College Hospital in New York City.

In any case, Albert eventually recovered his health and returned to the Regiment. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Spencer, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, probably in Michigan, in January of 1864, and he probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Albert was severely wounded in the right forearm on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and admitted on May 16 to Campbell general hospital in Washington, DC, for a “canister through right forearm fracturing radius.” He was still absent wounded when he was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was eventually transferred from Washington, DC, to St. Mary’s hospital in Detroit, and then to Harper hospital in Detroit where he was admitted on May 10, 1865. He was discharged on (probably) June 5, 1865 at Harper Hospital for “a gunshot wound of the right forearm at middle third necessitating resection of three inches of radius at seat of injury.”

He gave Oakville, Monroe County as his mailing address on his discharge paper, and in fact in 1864 he listed his next of kin as one Ames or Amos Hayes who then resided in Oakville. In any case he was living in Michigan in June of 1865 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 80535).

Eventually Albert left Michigan and moved out west, and by 1890 he was living in Vancouver, Clark County, Washington. He was probably working as a laborer and living on the east side of West Street between 8th and 9th in Vancouver, Clark County, Washington in 1891. In any case by 1911 he was living in Portland, Oregon when he was reported as a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

Albert died on May 16, 1917, probably in Michigan.

Wednesday, January 28, 2009

Clark Hawley

Clark Hawley was born on January 7, 1840, in Canada, the son of Harvey (b. 1807) and Elizabeth (Likens, b. 1812).

Connecticut native Harvey married Canadian-born Elizabeth, probably in Ontario (“Canada West”) where they lived for many years, sometime after 1853 Harvey took his family and left Canada, and eventually settled in Michigan. By 1860 Clark was working as a farmer, attending school with his seven younger siblings and living with his family on a farm in Keene, Ionia County.

He stood 5’11” with blue eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion, and was a 22-year-old farmer probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company C on February 28, 1862, and was mustered the same day. During the Regiment’s movements in July and August he was “left lame on march” and was supposed to follow the Regiment by train. He was a company cook in September of 1862, and was left sick at Upton’s Hill, Virginia on October 11, and admitted to Mt. Pleasant hospital in Washington, DC on October 17, 1862. Clark was alleged to have deserted from Mt. Pleasant hospital on November 20 and again on November 22, but these charges were removed in 1878. Apparently he reported to Camp Distribution, Virginia, on November 23 and was examined for discharge on December 31 and but was first rejected. He was examined again on January 17, 1863, and discharged for valvular heart disease on January 29, 1863 at Camp Convalescent, Virginia.

Clark eventually returned to Ionia and for many years worked as a salesman.

He was married to Canadian-born Eliza Converse (1846-1934), and they had at least one child, a daughter: Emma A. (1863) or Etta B. (b. 1865, Mrs. Schilds).

In June of 1889 Eliza and Clark were divorced; she had sued on the grounds of cruelty By 1870 Clark was working as a farmer and living with his wife and child in Easton, Ionia County. (His parents were still living in Keene in 1870.) In 1880 Clark was working as a “dealer in agricultural implements” and living with his wife and daughter on Jefferson Street in Ionia, Ionia County. Clark was still living in Ionia County in 1888. Clark subsequently married Mrs. Julia Ann King (nee Miller, b. 1854), on December 1, 1889, in Saranac, Ionia County. Clark was living in Ionia County in 1890.

In 1877 Clark applied for and received a pension (no. 159619), drawing $22.50 per month by 1915, and increased to $32 in 1918.

Clark died of chronic heart disease on July 28,1920, in Ionia County, and was buried in Oak Hill cemetery in Ionia (see photo G-794); his wife Eliza and daughter “Emma” are also buried with him.

In October of 1920 Julia moved to Florida. In 1920 she applied for and received a pension (no. 920049). That same year Eliza and her daughter Etta Schilds were living in Ionia. Julia was living in Boynton, Florida in 1934.

Tuesday, January 27, 2009

Andrew and Sanborn Hath Jr.

Andrew J. Hath was born in 1846 in Vermont, the son of Sanborn Sr. (1791-1879) and Emily (Hooker, b. 1802).

New Hampshire native Sanborn Sr. and Vermonter Emily were married in Peacham, Caledonia County, Vermont, in 1832. They eventually left Vermont and had settled in New York by 1837 when their son James was born, although apparently they returned to Vermont where they were living in 1841 and 1846. The family eventually moved on to Michigan and were probably living in Milan, Monroe County in 1840. In any case Sanborn Sr. eventually settled his family in Dewitt, Clinton County. By 1860 Andrew was working as a farm laborer, attending school with his siblings and living on the family farm in Dewitt, Clinton County.

Andrew stood 5’8” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion, and was a 15-year-old farmer possibly living in Dewitt when he enlisted, at the same time as his older half-brother Sanborn Hath, Jr., in Company G on May 13, 1861. According to Homer Thayer of Company G, Andrew was shot in the left leg on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and by mid-September was in E Street-Baptist Church hospital in Washington. He remained absent sick until he was discharged on March 18, 1863, at Detroit for a “gunshot wound of left leg inducing some lameness.”

Andrew listed Dewitt, Clinton County as his mailing address on his discharge paper, and was probably living in Dewitt n August of 1863 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 18674), drawing $4 per month by October of 1863.

Andrew reentered the service in Company C, Twenty-seventh Michigan infantry on December 9, 1863, at Owosso, Shiawassee County for 3 years, crediting Owosso’s First Ward, and was mustered on January 29, 1864, at Ovid, Shiawassee County.

He probably joined the regiment in east Tennessee in February or early March, and in March he was sick at Honeyville, Tennessee. The regiment left Knoxville, Tennessee for Annapolis where it arrived on April 5 and then on to the James River where it eventually participated in the battles of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania and North Anna in May and also at Cold Harbor in early June. It is possible that Andrew was wounded on June 3 at or near Cold Harbor. In any case, he was reported as absent wounded in June.

Andrew died of his wounds on June 25, 1864, probably in a hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was reportedly buried in Philadelphia’s National cemetery: no. 803.

By 1870 Sanborn, Sr and his wife were living in Charlotte, Eaton County.

In 1875 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 174416). Sanborn Sr. died in Dewitt in 1879.

Sanborn Hath Jr. was born in 1828 in Vermont, the son of Sanborn Sr. (1791-1879) and stepson of Emily (Hooker, b. 1802).

New Hampshire native Sanborn Sr. was married, presumably in Vermont where he was residing when his son Sanborn Jr. was born. In 1832 Sanborn Sr. married Vermonter Emily in Peacham, Caledonia County, Vermont. They eventually left Vermont and had settled in New York by 1837 when their son James was born, although apparently they returned to Vermont where they were living in 1841 and 1846. The family eventually moved on to Michigan and were probably living in Milan, Monroe County in 1840. In any case Sanborn Sr. eventually settled his family in Dewitt, Clinton County.

By 1860 Sanborn Jr. was working as a farm laborer, attending school with his siblings and living on the family farm in Dewitt, Clinton County. He may have been married to Virginia-born Sarah (b. 1835) and they may have had two children: Cornelia (b. 1853) and Rebecca (b. 1859).

Sanborn Jr. was 33 years old and possibly living in Clinton County, Michigan, when he enlisted as a wagoner in Company G on May 10, 1861, at about the same time as his younger half-brother Andrew Hath. According to Captain Robert Jefferds of Company G, Sanborn distinguished himself at the battle of First Bull Run. The Republican reported in mid-September that Hath was “the only wagoner who brought his load safely from the field of Bull Run. He brought thirty bushels of oats in addition, which was all the grain the horses of the Regiment had to subsist upon for nearly a fortnight. He has been promoted to wagoner of the Regiment for his conduct.”

Nevertheless, Sanborn reportedly deserted on February 11, 1862, at Alexandria, Virginia, or February 13 or 15, 1862 at Camp Michigan, Virginia.

There is no further record, and no pension is available.

By 1870 Sanborn, Sr. and his wife were living in Charlotte, Eaton County. Sanborn Sr. died in Dewitt in 1879.

Monday, January 26, 2009

Louis Hartmann

Louis Hartmann was born in 1841 in Württemberg, Germany.

Louis left Germany in the late 1850s, and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan where by 1860 he was working as a shoemaker and living at the Bridge Street House in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. (He was sharing his quarters were one Canadian, two Irishmen, one Englishman, one Pennsylvanian, two New Yorkers, and two Germans also from Württemberg.)

He was 20 years old and residing in Grand Rapids when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run.

He was absent sick in a hospital from August through September, and died of his wounds on September 18 or October 31, 1862, at Armory Square hospital in Washington, DC. He was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery), section C no. 3212.

Sunday, January 25, 2009

Henry Hartmann

Henry Hartmann was born in 1809 in Hanover, Germany.

Henry immigrated to the United States sometime before the war broke out, and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’7” with blue eyes, sandy hair and a dark complexion, and was a 52-year-old gardener possibly living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was missing in action on June 30 or July 1, 1862, “in front of Richmond,” Virginia, probably at White Oak Swamp, and was absent sick in the hospital in August. He was discharged on September 4, 1862, at Fairfax Seminary hospital, Virginia for “hemorrhoids internal and external.”

After his discharge Henry returned to Muskegon County where he worked as a carpenter in Norton in the late 1860s. He was probably the same Henry Hartman, age 60 who in 1870 was working as a laborer in Norton, and living with his wife German-born Mary (b. 1820) and two children: George (b. 1854) and William (b. 1858). (If so they had probably been married in Germany and were living in Württemberg in 1854, settling in Michigan by 1858.) By 1877 “Henry” was farming on 160 acres near Little Black Lake in Norton, and spent most of his life working as farmer or laborer. In 1890 there was one Henry Hartman who had apparently served in the Fourth Michigan (infantry or cavalry is not reported) and who was living in Norton and Muskegon, Muskegon County in 1890.

In 1882 he applied for and received pension no. (308236).

Henry died on November 10, 1891, presumably at his home in Norton, and was buried in Norton cemetery: Grand Army of the Republic section, G-1 grave no. 127.

In 1892 his widow Anna (?), received pension no. 354110.

Saturday, January 24, 2009

Robert L. Hart

Robert L. Hart was born in 1845 in West Lebanon, Lebanon County, Pennsylvania, the son of John D. (b. 1802) and Nancy (Lowry).

Pennsylvania natives John and Nancy were presumably married in Pennsylvania. By 1850 Robert was attending school with two of his younger siblings and living with his family on a large farm (his father owned $1100 worth of real estate) in Young Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania; next door lived his uncle Robert Hart and his family.. By 1860 Robert was attending school with three of his younger siblings and living with his family on a large farm (his father owned some $4800 worth of real estate) in West Lebanon, Young Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. Robert left Pennsylvania and moved westward, eventually settling in Detroit sometime before 1863.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion, and was an 18-year-old laborer possibly living in Detroit when he enlisted in Company H on May 1, 1863, at Detroit for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. Apparently Robert had originally enlisted in the Fifth Michigan infantry.

According to a letter dated June 6, 1863, at Camp Sickles, Virginia, from First Lieutenant William H. Tillotson, recruiting officer for the Fifth Michigan, to Lieutenant Colonel Smith, commanding the barracks at Detroit, Hart had the oath administered to him “just before the boat left for Cleveland, Ohio, but had no blanks to complete the enlistment and have been unable to procure them until this day. This must by [sic] my excuse for sending them at this late date.” In any case, Tillotson went on to inform Colonel Smith that Hart “has been borne up on the rolls of the 3rd Michigan Infantry Vols. he having preferred that Regt. He is entitled to State and [national] Government bounties and for transportation to Washington.”

In any case, Robert eventually reported to the Regiment at Potomac Creek, Virginia, probably sometime in June of 1863. He was reported sick in the hospital in May of 1864 and was driving an ambulance when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He remained detached as an ambulance driver through April of 1865 and was a teamster in the Quartermaster department in May of 1865. Robert was mustered out probably on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

It is not known if Robert returned to Michigan after the war.

He was married to Pennsylvania native Martha Patterson (b. 1848), and they had at least one child: John (b. 1873).

By 1870 Robert was working as a farmer and living with his wife in West Lebanon, Young Township, Indiana County, Pennsylvania, and in 1880 he was working in a sawmill and living with his wife and son in West Lebanon. In 1890 he was living in Young, Indiana County, Pennsylvania. By 1901 Robert was probably living in Iowa when he applied for and received a pension (no. 1120655).

Robert was possibly married a second time to Illinois native Jennie (b. 1853).

By 1920 Robert was probably living in Knox Township, Pottawattamie County, Iowa in 1920.

Robert died on May 15, 1925, in West Lebanon, Pennsylvania.

Friday, January 23, 2009

Robert Harrison

Robert Harrison was born on April 18, 1822 in New York.

His brother Phelps A. moved from New York to Ohio with his wife sometime before 1845, moving his family on to Michigan sometime between 1851 and 1853. By 1860 Robert himself had left New York and settled in western Michigan where he was working as a farmer and living with Phelps and his family in Croton, Newaygo County.

Robert stood 5’11” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 39 years old when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. In July of 1862 Robert was reported sick in the hospital at Fort McHenry, Maryland where he remained until he was discharged on September 20, 1862, at Fort McHenry, Maryland, for sciatica.

After his discharge from the army Robert returned to Michigan, and was living in Tyrone, Kent County when he married Michigan native Susan Pettingill (b. 1829) on November 27, 1862; they had at least two children: Nettie (b. 1866) and Myrtie (b. 1870); also living with them was a 9-year-old boy named George Johnson. (It is possible that Susan had been married before.)

In any case, by 1870 Robert was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Croton, Newaygo County. (Next door lived the Peter Russell family; their son Peter had died during the war while serving with the Third Michigan.) By 1880 Robert was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Algoma, Kent County. In 1888 he was living in Cedar Springs, Kent County, in Algoma, Kent County in 1894.

In 1879 he applied for and received a pension (no. 398529).

Robert died of paralysis on February 14, 1895, in Algoma, and was buried in Elmwood cemetery, Cedar Springs.

His widow also applied for and received a pension (no. 553862).

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Jared M. Harrison

Jared M. Harrison was born in 1832, probably in New York, the son of Allen (d. 1850) and Polly (b. 1796).

Allen and Polly were married in March of 1819 in Oneida County, County. Allen died in Litchfield, Herkimer County, New York in September of 1850. Jared left New York State and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan. It is possible that his mother was the same Polly Harrison living in Adrian’s Fourth Ward, Lenawee County in 1860 and who was in the building stone business with one J. H. Wood in Adrian by 1863.

In any case, in 1860 Jared was probably working as a farmer and living alone in Paris, Kent County; next door lived the family of Orleans Spaulding -- Orlean’s son Samuel and a farm laboer by the name of John Laraway who worked for Orleans would both enlist in Company A, as would Minor Spaulding who also living in Paris.

In any case, Jared was 29 years old and may have been working as a farmer in Cascade, Kent County when he enlisted at the age of 29 in Company A on May 13, 1861.

Jared was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and presumably among the unknown soldiers buried at Seven Pines National Cemetery.

In 1862 his mother was apparently living in Paris, Kent County when she applied for and received a pension (no. 9189).

In 1870 there was a Polly Harrison, age 74 (b. in New York) living with the Huntley family in Wayland village, Allegan County.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

William H. Harris

William H. Harris was born in 1842.

William was 19 years old and possibly living in Kent County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861, with the consent of the Justice of the Peace. He allegedly deserted at Arlington, Virginia, on June 30 or July 20 or 23, 1861.

There is no further record, and no pension seems to be available.

Tuesday, January 20, 2009

William Harris

William Harris was born in 1828 in Kent, England.

William eventually left England and immigrated to the United States, settling in western Michigan by 1858 when he married Susannah A. Cheney in Ottawa County.

He stood 5’3” with gray eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was 35 years old and employed as an engineer possibly living in Muskegon County or perhaps in Spring Lake, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company H on December 26, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Spring Lake, Ottawa County (or Dalton, Muskegon County), and was mustered December 30 at Grand Rapids. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He joined the Regiment on March 11, 1864, at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and was severely wounded in the left shoulder, either on May 6 at the Wilderness, Virginia, or on May 12 at Spotsylvania, Virginia; in any case, he was hospitalized on May 18 at McClellan hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

William was still absent hospitalized when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick until he was discharged for disability on April 3, 1865, at Philadelphia.

After he was discharged from the army William returned to Michigan, eventually settling in Muskegon, Muskegon County.

In April of 1865 he applied for and received a pension (no. 43792).

William was working as a laborer and apparently suffered from acute alcoholism when he died in Muskegon on October 21, 1873, of delirium tremens, and was buried in either Muskegon or Ottawa County.

In 1877 his widow applied for a pension (no. 234562).

Monday, January 19, 2009

John Harris

John Harris.

He reportedly enlisted (date and place unknown) in Unassigned but there is no further record. There is no service record found in the Third Michigan records at the National Archives, nor is he found in the 1905 Third Michigan Regimental history.

As of this writing there were some 14 men named John Harris who enlisted from the state of Michigan, eight of whom listed no middle initial, ranging from October of 1861 to March of 1865, and in ages of 18-35.

Sunday, January 18, 2009

George W. Harris

George W. Harris was born on February 7, 1842, in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan.

George stood 5’9” with gray eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 19-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company F on May 13, 1861. (He was quite possibly related to Charles Harris, who was also from the vicinity of Lowell in Kent County and who would also reenter the service in the Tenth Michigan cavalry. See below.)

George was reported missing in action at Glendale or White Oak Swamp, Virginia, on July 1, 1862, and in fact he had been taken prisoner during the battle for Malvern Hill. He was confined for one month and five days, exchanged, probably on August 5, 1862. On August 6 the Richmond Dispatch reported that at

About 1 o’clock yesterday three thousand of the Federal prisoners on Belle Island left the city for “Varina,” (the farm of Albert Aiken, Esq., twelve miles from Richmond,) a guide having been procured from Capt. Alexander’s detective force to pilot them thither. They went under flag of truce to be exchanged, and were to be met by officers of the United States Army, empowered to effect that object. The party consisted wholly of soldiers, no commissioned officers being in the party. The guard attending the party was composed of a portion of the 42d Mississippi regiment, under Col. Miller. The prisoners were permitted to go by the C. S. Military Prison, and while in front of the building they cheered their imprisoned compatriots, (Generals and other officers,) and otherwise testified their respect for them. They appeared elated at the prospect of going home. The day was intensely hot, and it was intimated, after they had been gone for some hours, that many of them broke down, and had to be left on the way-side, while two or three died. There are 1,700 Yankees yet to go.

George was quite probably with that very detachment. In any case he was soon returned to the Regiment at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

After he rejoined the Regiment he wrote on August 17, 1862, to his “Dearest Mary” and told her of his recent ordeal.

It is with pleasure amounting almost to agony that I am permitted to write to you once more. Strange as it may seem to you until explained I have been unable to write to you for more than a month. I was taken prisoner by the rebels at the battle of Malvern Hill and kept in confinement for the period of one month and five days but am now exchanged and have returned to my Regiment. I am as yet very weak in consequence of the suffering that I endured while a prisoner of war.

I will not attempt to describe my capture and sufferings as we have matters nearer our hearts which we will talk of first. Firstly with regard to that likeness. If you have got it taken for gracious sake send it to me immediately for I long to look upon your fair form once more. Please send it in a case as a package, as it is almost I think quite an impossibility for me to procure a case here. But pray send it immediately. It will soon be pay day and as I was a prisoner until yesterday I missed Regimental muster but my officers tell me that they think they can arrange it so that I will get at least a part of my pay. [If] I do I will try and send enough to procure that pen that I promised you some time ago. . . . I must explain myself. When I arrived in camp last night after dark I found two letters at the office: One from yourself and one from father. Yours was dated June the 22nd. I have another thing to explain. My comrade John Miller, the man who swore to stand by me through thick and thin before we left Grand Rapids and has always kept that pledge inviolate, he has stood by me in danger and we have fought side by side; we tented together and slept together and are as firm friends as ever. He of course knew your address having seen me direct my letters many a time and when he was sure that I was either killed or captured he considered it his duty and in fact it was my request that if I fell in action he should in case he survived to acquaint my friends with the facts. He answered yours of about the 19th of July which I thanked hastily for doing when he told me what he had done for I naturally supposed my love that it relieved your mind of a great deal of anxiety. And now love goodbye; you shall know all in my next but by all means write immediately and send the likeness with it.

George and Ohio native Mary A. (b. 1842) eventually married. They had at least four children: Emily (b. 1863), Walter (b. 1867), Andrew (b. 1870) and Franklin O. (b. 1876).

George was absent sick in the hospital from October through December of 1862, and discharged on December 22, 1862, at the Patent Office hospital, Washington, DC for “chronic diarrhea, great emaciation and debility contracted in service.”

He listed Lowell, Kent County as his mailing address on his discharge paper, and returned to Michigan after he left the army.

In 1863 he applied for and received a pension (no. 401872).

George apparently reentered the service for one year as a Private on February 9, 1865, in Company I, Tenth Michigan cavalry. (Curiously, so did Charles D. Harris, who also served in the Old Third and who was also from the vicinity of Lowell before the war. See above.) George joined the regiment on March 16 at Knoxville, Tennessee, and was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865, at Memphis, Tennessee.

George again returned to Michigan after the war, and in 1867-68 he may have been working as a shoemaker for H. G. Porter, and living on the west side of Greenwich between Fulton and Louis Streets in Grand Rapids. George was working as a boot-maker and living with his wife and three children in Nelson, Kent County in 1870. He was working as a Baptist minister and living with his family in Mundy, Genesee County in 1880 and living in Grand Rapids in 1882 when he attended the annual Old Third Infantry association in December. In fact he was a charter member of the Michigan Association of Survivors of Southern Prisons, and a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. He was also a member of the Michigan Association of Ex-Prisoners of War.

By 1888 he was residing in Bannister, Gratiot County, and by 1890 he was living in Elba, Bannister Township. Toward the end of his life he was living in or near Ashley, Gratiot County, where in 1900 he served as pastor of the Ashley Baptist Church. He was also a member of the GAR Kirby Post No. 323 in Ashley.

He was married a second time to one Fanny M.

George died on September 14, 1913, in Ashley, and was buried in North Star cemetery.

In 1914 his widow was still living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 837461).

Saturday, January 17, 2009

Charles D. Harris

Charles D. Harris was born in 1840, in England.

Charles was 21 years old and possibly living in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861; Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County. (He was quite possibly related to George Harris, who was also from the vicinity of Lowell in Kent County and who would also reenter the service in the Tenth Michigan cavalry.)

Charles was reported missing in action on June 30, 1862 (probably at White Oak Swamp) during the retreat from Richmond down the Virginia “Peninsula,” but he eventually returned to the Regiment on August 8 at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia. He was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army Charles probably returned to Michigan where he apparently reentered the service at the age of 23 in Company I, Tenth Michigan cavalry at Boston, Ionia County on February 9, 1865, for 1 year. (So did George W. Harris; see below.) In any case, Charles is not found in the descriptive rolls for the Tenth Michigan cavalry, but is listed in the 1905 Regimental history for that Regiment. He joined the Regiment on March 16 at Knoxville, Tennessee, and was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865 at Memphis. (All dates identical for George Harris; see below.)

Charles eventually returned to Michigan.

He was married to Michigan native Addie E. or Evangeline (1853-1910), and they had at least three children: Clara (b. 1871), Emma (b. 1874) and Guy (b. 1880).

By 1880 Charles was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Brookfield, Eaton County.

Charles was apparently married a second time.

In 1878 he applied for and received a pension (no. 736879).

He was living in Sheridan, Montcalm County in 1890 and in 1911.

Charles died on May 13, 1918, in Sheridan, and may be buried in Sheridan cemetery, in Montcalm County.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 1123025) but the certificate was never granted.

Friday, January 16, 2009

William Harrington

William Harrington was born on July 12, 1830, or in 1840.

In the official 1905 regimental history for the Fifth Michigan infantry, there is one William H. Harrington, age, 21, from Shiawassee County, who enlisted in Company H, Fifth Michigan infantry on August 9, 1861, at Fort Wayne, for three years, and was mustered in on August 28. He was discharged for disability on March 20, 1863, at Washington, DC.

In any case, William was 23 years old when he enlisted in Unassigned, Third Michigan infantry on December 29, 1863, at Owosso, Shiawassee County for 3 years, and was mustered on January 21, 1864, crediting Detroit.

There is no further record (and there is no service record found in the Third Michigan records at the National Archives), although he is listed in the official 1905 regimental history. And in the Regimental Descriptive Rolls for the Third Michigan the only notation made after his enlistment information was “see veteran book no. 63.” This implies William was in fact a “veteran” or reenlistee on December 29 and not a “new” recruit.

Furthermore, on December 28 the Fifth Michigan regiment returned en masse to Michigan, and was reenlisted as a “veteran” regiment (i.e., made up of sufficient number of reenlisted soldiers to retain its numerical designation). It is quite plausible that William reenlisted shortly after the Fifth returned to Michigan and was mistakenly listed as Unassigned for the Third Michigan.

And indeed there was a William H. Herrington, age 21 who enlisted in Company H, Fifth Michigan infantry, on January 4, 1864, at Owosso, for three years. He was most likely the same William Harrington who had served in the Fifth (see above), was mistakenly listed as having joined the Third Michigan and in fact reenlisted in Company H. In any case, he was wounded in action at the Wilderness on May 5, 1864, and mustered out with the regiment at Jeffersonville, Indiana, on July 5, 1865.

This “second” William Herrington returned to Michigan, eventually settling in Howell, Livingston County. He was living in Burns, Shiawassee County in 1890.

This Fifth Michigan William Herrington or Harrington was married to Mary E., and in 1863 he applied for and received a pension (no. 101566) based on his Fifth Michigan service; his widow also received a pension (no. 499162). It seems that this William H. Harrington was born on July 12, 1830, and died, possibly in Howell on March 9, 1900. He was buried in Lakeview cemetery in Howell: section A, lot 81. (See photo G-621).

There was also a William N. Herrington, age 30, who enlisted in Company B, reorganized Third Michigan infantry, on September 26, 1864, at Grattan, Kent County, for three years, and was mustered on October 1. He probably never left the state when the regiment departed for the southwestern theater of operations in October, and he died of disease on April 11, 1865, probably at the rendezvous in Jackson, Michigan. He was probably reinterred in the Soldier’s Cemetery: no. 20, in Jackson; and according to burial records he was at one time interred in Mt. Evergreen cemetery in Jackson. (Curiously the Fifth Michigan William was also reported as having died on April 12, 1865 at Indianapolis, Indiana, and was allegedly buried in the cemetery there: no. 506.)

Another William Harrington, age 16, enlisted at Wyoming, Kent County, in Unassigned, reorganized Third Michigan infantry in March of 1865 but there is no further record of him.

Thursday, January 15, 2009

Richard Harrington

Richard Harrington was born in 1837 in Macomb County, Michigan, the son of William (b. 1795) and Mary (b. 1808).

Rhode Island native William and New York-born Mary were married and eventually settled in Michigan where they were living by 1831. By 1850 Richard was attending school with his three siblings and living with his family on a farm in Forest, Genesee County. By 1860 Richard was probably working as a farm laborer and living with the Lyman family in Richfield, Genesee County.

Richard stood 5’6” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 24-year-old farmer possibly living in Shiawassee County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861; he may have been related to Aaron Harrington also of Company B. He was discharged on June 18, 1862, at Knight Street hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania or in Washington, DC, for a dislocated knee.

He returned to Michigan where he reentered the service as a Private in Company M, Third Michigan cavalry on December 21, 1863, at Forest, Genesee County for 3 years, crediting Forest, and was mustered on January 2, 1864, at Flint, Genesee County. He joined the Regiment on May 30 at Huntersville, Arkansas, and was probably on duty with the regiment throughout 1864.

The regiment eventually moved from Arkansas to Carrollton, Louisiana in March of 1865 and then on to participate in the siege of Mobile, Alabama during March and April. It then moved to occupy Mobile and was subsequently transferred to Baton Rouge, Louisiana and to Shreveport in early June. The regiment marched from Shreveport to San Antonio, Texas, from July 10-August 2 and went into garrison duty at San Antonio. By November of 1865 Richard was serving in the Quartermaster department. He was mustered out with the regiment on February 12, 1866, at San Antonio, Texas, and was discharged on March 15 at Jackson, Michigan.

Following his discharge from the service Richard returned to Michigan.

He was married to Catharine Cole or Macey (d. 1873), on May 14, 1871, and they had at least one child: Stewart (b. 1872).

Richard was probably living in Forest when Catharine died. In any case, he was living in Forest, Michigan when he married New York native Mindwell Hathey or Hawley (1834-1912), on April 15, 1876, in Otisville, Michigan.

For many years Richard worked as a laborer. By 1880 he was working in a sawmill and living with his wife in Forest, Genesee County; also living with him was his brother Wilbur or Willard. He was living in Dodge, Clare County in 1890, in Genesee County in 1894, in Otisville, Genesee County in 1896, and in Pinconning, Bay County in 1907 when he was drawing $12.00 (pension no. 777,889), drawing $15 per month by 1910.

He was a member of the Wheeler GAR Post No. 186 in Otisville.

Richard was a Protestant when he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 4991) on July 31, 1907, and discharged on October 3 at his own request, probably returning to Pinconning. (His wife continued to reside in Pinconning while he was an inmate of the Home.)

He died in Michigan on March 28, 1910.

In any case his widow was living in Michigan, probably in Pinconning, in May of 1910 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 726264).

Wednesday, January 14, 2009

Aaron Harrington

Aaron Harrington was born in 1828 in Genesee County, New York.

Aaron left New York and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan.

He stood 5’6’ with black eyes and hair and a light complexion, and was 33-year-old a farmer possibly living in Shiawassee County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861; he may have been related to Richard Harrington who would also enlist in Company B.

On the night of July 21, 1861, following the Union retreat from Bull Run, Virginia, Aaron found himself wandering around the Virginia countryside with another member of Company B, Ezra Ransom. Years after the war, Ransom described their ordeal.

Our tramp back to W[ashington] in a drizzling rain without grub was rather an unpleasant feature of that little difficulty with the gentlemen of the south. On reaching W[ashington] the Col [Colonel Daniel McConnell] told what was left over from those who had fallen out by the way side that whoever wished to could go to Alexandria for the night if they would be sure and call on him at the old camp ground on Arlington [heights] the next day. So Aaron [Harrington] & I went to A[lexandria]. On entering the town whom should we see sitting on the porch of a small house and holding his horse by the bridle but our Lieut. Col. [Ambrose Stevens] who asked us if we knew where his Regt. was. We wandered around the old town which was just jammed full of refugees -- offering a five dollar bill apiece for a bed but there were none for sale.

Although the two men became separated, Aaron eventually found his way back to rejoin the Regiment. He was wounded in the left hand and “back shocked by shell” on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and was absent wounded in Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC, from July though August, but by early July was reported as up and about.

He never returned to duty, however, and allegedly deserted on September 21 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was reported absent sick from October through December, and in a hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from January of 1863 through February. He was discharged on March 11, 1863, at West’s Buildings hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, for “anchylosis and distortion of the left hand and thumb.”

Aaron returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army.

In March of 1863 Aaron applied for a pension (no. 11397), but the certificate was never granted.

In fact, Aaron reentered the army. He was 37 years old when he enlisted as a private in Company F, Tenth Michigan cavalry, on October 19, 1863 and was mustered in on October 23. On September 5, 1865, he was admitted to Harper hospital in Detroit. He was discharged from the army on September 15, 1865, at Detroit.

He may be the same Aaron Harrington who died at the Shiawassee County poor farm on December 6, 1869, and is presumably buried there.

Tuesday, January 13, 2009

John Harper

John Harper was born in 1842.

John was 20 years old when he enlisted in Unassigned on February 24, 1862, at Grand Rapids, Michigan, for 3 years.

There is no further record.

Monday, January 12, 2009

Herman Hardenburg

Herman Hardenburg was born in 1829 in New York.

Herman was married to Pennsylvania native Helen M. (b. 1836), and they had at least two children: Alice (b. 1855) and Sarah Eveline (b. 1858), and by 1855 they had settled in western Michigan. By 1860 Herman was working as a brick maker and living with his wife and two daughters in Dewitt, Clinton County.

Herman, or Henry as he was also called, was 32 years old and probably still living in Clinton County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

On November 3, 1861, he was hospitalized at Annapolis, Maryland, but he eventually recovered his health and rejoined the Regiment. He was missing in action “in front of Richmond” (probably at White Oak Swamp) on either June 30 or July 1, 1862, and was subsequently (but only briefly) listed as having deserted, then as dropped from the company rolls and finally reported as a prisoner-of-war.

Although there is no further official confirmation, the Detroit Advertiser and Tribune listed Hardenburg among the sick and wounded Michigan soldiers in Richmond in mid-July, and by the first of August reported Henry to be among the sick and wounded Michigan soldiers who had recently arrived in New York, in the charge of one Dr. A. M. McDonald, “taken on board the Elm City, at City Point, Va., Tuesday, July 29, 1862.”

Herman was reported as having died on March 15, 1863.

There is no further record.

In 1864 one Helen M. Hardenburg, Herman’s widow applied for a pension (no. 64057), but the certificate was apparently never granted.

In fact, it is quite likely that Herman survived the war and returned to his home in Michigan and Helen abandoned her pension application. In 1870 Herman was reported to be working as a carpenter and living with his wife Helen and two daughters in Chester, Eaton County, and they eventually settled in Tuscola County. He was quite probably the same Herman Hardenburgh living as a widower and working as a servant for the William Allen family in Arbela, Tuscola County, in 1880.

Herman reportedly died in Tuscola County and was buried with along with his wife, in Newton cemetery (also known as Old Arbela cemetery), Tuscola County: lot 62. Moreover, he has a government headstone denoting his service in Company C, Third Michigan infantry. Curiously, according to another source Herman is buried in Argyle, Sanilac County.

Sunday, January 11, 2009

Martin Van Buren Hapeman - updated 2/28/09

Martin Van Buren Hapeman was born on February 8, 1840, in Rushville, Yates County (or possibly Walden), New York, the son of Phillip Hale (b. 1800) and Henrietta Bodine (b. 1815).

Both New York natives, Martin’s parents were probably married in New York and they resided there for some years. By 1850 Martin was attending school with his younger sister Angeline and living on the family farm in Waterloo, Seneca County, New York. In any case Martin was probably living in Wauwatosa, Milwaukee County, Wisconsin (a suburb of Milwaukee) in 1860, possibly with his mother who was listed as a widow.

Martin was 21 years old, stood 5’7,” with dark complexion, brown eyes and dark hair and had possibly just arrived in Muskegon County, Michigan, where he was probably working as a logger, from Wisconsin when he enlisted in Company H on May 13, 1861. He was sick in the Division hospital from March of 1863 through July, and on September 18, 1863, he was admitted to the Second Division hospital in Alexandria, Virginia, for treatment of secondary syphilis. (That same year his mother was reportedly still living in Wauwatosa.)

Martin remained hospitalized until he was transferred to Sickles’ Barracks (probably Camp Sickles), Virginia, on May 23, 1864, and was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

It is not known if Martin ever returned to Michigan.

He worked for many years on the Northwestern railroad out of Chicago.

Martin married Welsh-born Augusta Henrietta Emily Webber (1854-1951) on March 14, 1872, in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and they had at least four children: Vaughn Webber (b. 1875), Harriet Lee (b. 1873), Ruby E. (b. 1885) and Vivia Lorraine (b. 1887).



By 1875 they had settled in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois where they resided for some years. According to one family source Martin “and his wife’s brother, Harry Webber, invested in a furniture store in Chicago. Unfortunately, due to embezzlement by another partner, a depression, or a serious illness of horses, which had them, dying in the Streets,”this particular business venture didn’t work out and Martin then “returned to his old job on the Northwestern railroad. Harry, who had also been working on the trains, began a career as a theatrical producer and it was he who put Martin’s wife ‘Millie’ on the stage.” The family moved from Chicago to Wisconsin in about 1876, eventually settling in Baraboo. By 1885 and 1887 they were still living in Baraboo, but around 1888 or 1892 Martin and his family moved to Necodah, Juneau County, Wisconsin where he was living in 1895. In fact he probably lived in Necodah until his death in 1912.

In 1889 Martin was living in Wisconsin when he applied for and received a pension (no. 961116).

Martin died on December 23, 1912 in Necodah and was initially buried in Bayview cemetery in Necedah but his remains were removed to Rose Hill cemetery in Chicago after his wife died.

Augusta was living in Illinois in February of 1913 when she applied for and received a widow’s pension (n. 958014). She was probably living in Park Ridge, Cook County, when she died in 1949 (or 1951) and was buried in Rose Hill cemetery.

Saturday, January 10, 2009

Gilbert Hansen

Gilbert Hansen was born in 1841 in Norway.

Gilbert immigrated to America sometime before 1864 and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’6” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 23-year-old laborer possibly living in Manistee, Manistee County when he enlisted in Unassigned on February 29, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day.

There is no further record.

Thursday, January 08, 2009

James and John Hanna

James Hanna was born on December 12, 1840 in Tecumseh, Lenawee County, Michigan, the son of John (1808-1874) and Elizabeth (Curry, 1818-1865).

John left his home in Ireland, possibly with Irish native and immigrated to America. They were married and eventually moved westward and by 1840 had settled in Tecumseh, Michigan. (That year there was one Joseph Hanna living in Tecumseh.) John eventually moved his family to Grand Rapids in 1843, but by 1850 had resettled them on a farm in Allendale, Ottawa County. By 1860 James was working as a chopper and living at the Ewing boarding house in Blendon, Ottawa County. Apparently by 1860 his father John had moved his family to a farm in Paris, Kent County. (Next door to the Hanna family in Paris worked a farm laborer named Freling Peck who would also join the Third Michigan.)

He stood 5’8” with black eyes, red hair and a light complexion and was 20 years old and residing in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861, with the consent of the Justice of the Peace (his younger brother John would join him the following March). He was absent on furlough in March of 1863, and awarded the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863.

James reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Sparta, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was taken prisoner on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, confined first at Libby prison in Richmond, Virginia, and then at Andersonville, Georgia.

According to James on May 6 he was shot in the right arm, the “ball entered at the elbow up the arm struck the should and stopped under the skin had it cut out by a reb el soldier.” On May 13 he was

taken with others able to walk to Gordonsville. Sat wet and took cold. Arm began to swell. Lynchburg May 16. Left here with others to sick to go further. Arm running matter two pieces of cord come out of hole at elbow one 2 1/2 inches long the other two inches had no care, dirty water to bathe with. Lynchburg June 9 Started for Andersonville Ga where we arrived June 18th. Andersonville Sept. 13th taken to Florence South Carolina. Arrived here Sept. 15th. Florence S.C. Dec. 8th. Paroled today. Dec. 9th on cars for Charleston where we arrived Dec. 10th. Dec. 11th got on board transport at noon. Dec. 15th arrived at Annapolis. Dec. 24th Parole furlough. Started for home, Grand Rapids, Mich. I was sick when I started, was delirious with typhoid fever fr three weeks. I think my extensions of furlough will show when able returned to Annapolis meantime had been transferred to Camp Chase, Ohio. There got another furlough to go home. June 27th 1865 got my discharge by Gen. O. No. 77, War Dept. A.G.O.”

He was transferred as prisoner-of-war to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and exchanged sometime in late fall of 1864. He was reported as a paroled prisoner and Sergeant at Camp Chase, Ohio, March 10, 1865, although in fact as he himself noted later he was at home in Michigan recovering from his ordeal.

His mother Elizabeth had died at the family home in Paris, Kent County, on February 5, 1865, and four days later the Grand Rapids Eagle reported James was at home in Michigan recuperating. Describing Hanna as “a true soldier,” the paper went on to say

It affords us pleasure to learn that Sergeant James Hanna, of the old Third Michigan Infantry, who has been sick, right unto death, for some weeks past, has recovered and is again able to be out around. The Sergeant was taken prisoner on the sixth of May last, in the battle of the Wilderness and conveyed to Andersonville, in which Rebel prison he remained most of the time for some seven months, when he, with others was exchanged and allowed to visit his home in this city, for rest and the recovery of his health. Young Hanna, had a brother John Hanna, who was in the same Regiment, and was killed in a skirmish on the 27th of October last [Hatcher’s Run and Boydton Plank road, Virginia]. Another brother, Alexander Hanna, a member of the First Michigan Artillery, lost a leg in the siege of Atlanta, and has just returned on a furlough of thirty days, he not yet having been discharged from the service. Added to all of these afflictions, the young soldier now mourns the death of a loved mother who died on the 6th inst. Who will not drop a tear in sympathy with the afflicted soldier?

James was discharged at Camp Chase on June 27, 1865.

Following his discharge from the army James returned to western Michigan and lived virtually his entire life in the Grand Rapids vicinity. He resided in Georgetown, Ottawa County until about 1870 when he moved to Grand Rapids where he stayed about 6 years. In 1876 he moved to Paris Township, Kent County until 1890 then back to Grand Rapids where he remained until at least 1913.

On April 20, 1874, the Eagle published a most curious story regarding James Hanna’s father and his family.

Last week and the latter part of the preceding week, the principal cause on trial in the Circuit Court, the one that occupied nearly all of the time, was the case of Kennedy Hanna against James Hanna and others, made on an appeal from Probate Court. In the circuit Court the decision was in favor of the contestants, as was noted in the Daily Eagle of Saturday. The case possesses much interest for many residents of the town of Gaines, and a short history of it will not be unwelcome to all the readers of the Eagle. Among the old residents of Gaines was an old man named John Hanna, who had seven children, five sons and two daughters. One of his sons died before his decease [John, during the war] which occurred in the early part of last year. -- John Hanna in his life time was possessed of the idea that his wife's [Elizabeth] children were all illegitimate, and in 1862 began proceedings to obtain a divorce from her. The case was in court for about 3 years, and was finally terminated by the death of his wife, after he had expended several hundred dollars ineffectually. Of course her children sided with Mrs. Hanna and thus provoked their father's enmity. After their mother died her husband refused to pay the funeral expenses and they compelled him by a suit at law, which increased his anger against them. He said repeatedly during his life time (as it appears in the testimony in the Circuit Court) that the children, James and others, were not his children, and never should had a dollar of his property. He made a will bequeathing a few hundred dollars to two sisters living in Ireland, devising [dividing] the balance of his property, about $12,000 worth, to a relative, a nephew we believe, named Kennedy Hanna, who is a resident of Gaines, naming Kennedy Hanna as his sole executor.

The will was admitted to probate, James Hanna and his brothers and sisters saying that since it would undoubtedly have to go to the Circuit Court, they would contest the will there on an appeal from the Probate Court. The contest is made on the part of the claimants of the property, legally termed the contestants, on the ground that their father was a monomaniac on the subject of their illegitimacy and their mother's infidelity to him, and that his will was evidently made as it was, because of this mania. The case occupied nearly nine days in the Circuit Court, some 75 witnesses being sworn and a large mass of testimony from the testimony in the old divorce case being read. Messers Holmes & Godwin appeared for the proponent, and Messers Taggert & Allen were attorney's for the contestants, assisted by Hon. Thomas H. Church as counsel. The decision was given as noted above, and unless the case is taken to the Supreme Court the heirs by blood will get their father's property. Many of the old residents in Gaines, who have known the whole history of the family and of the case, claim that the decision is a just one.

A curious twist to this tale is that on June 11, 1881 the Eagle reported that one “Catharine Hanna of Gaines Township became the wife of John Hanna [on] January 4, 1879. She has filed a bill of complaint in the circuit Court suing for a divorce, charging as a reason that he is addicted to the excessive use of intoxicants.”

James married Michigan native Matilda Jane Carpenter (b. 1850), on September 7, 1871, in Grand Rapids, and they had at least three children: William (b. 1873), Emma (b. 1875), Eva L. (b. 1878), twins Warren and Walter (b. 1882) Daisy Lucella (b. 1885) Clara (b. 1887). (His obituary listed seven children: William, Warren, Walter, Mrs. Charles Fox, Mrs. Frank Molesta, Mrs. Jacob Molesta and Mrs. Daisy Beems. Eva and Clara were both married to Molestas.)

In 1880 James was working as a farmer and living with his wife Matilda and three children in Paris, Kent County. He was living in Paris, in June of 1889 when he attended the reunion at Gettysburg, and still living in Paris in 1890.

By 1894 and 1895 he was living in Grand Rapids’ Eleventh ward, and in 1906 was reportedly residing at 1029 Oakdale Avenue in Grand Rapids, and in fact he lived on Oakdale Avenue in his last years: he was living at 1029 Oakdale in 1907, 1908, 1909, 1910, 1911 and 1912, and by 1918 at 423 Oakdale. By 1920 James and Jane were living in Grand Rapids; also living with them was his daughter Daisy and her husband Jacob Beems and their son.

James was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, as well as Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Grand Rapids and he received pension no. 74,821.

He died of “acute indigestion” (angina pectoris) on Thursday evening, April 1, 1920 at his home, 423 Oakdale southeast, in Grand Rapids. Funeral services were held at his home at 2:30 p.m. Monday and he was buried under the auspices of the Grand Rapids Custer Post No. 7, in Oak Hill cemetery: section 10 lot 197.

In April of 1920 his widow applied for a pension (no. 891429).

John Hanna was born in 1845 in Ottawa County, Michigan, the son of John (1808-1874) and Elizabeth (Curry, 1818-1865).

John (elder) left his home in Ireland, possibly with Elizabeth (she was born in Ireland as well) and immigrated to America. They eventually moved westward and by 1840 had settled in Tecumseh, Michigan. John eventually moved his family to Grand Rapids in 1843, but by 1850 had resettled them on a farm in Allendale, Ottawa County. By 1860 John (elder) had moved his family to a farm in Paris, Kent County, where John (younger) was attending school with his four younger siblings, working as a farm laborer and living with his family. (younger) was working as a farm laborer in Kent County. Next door worked a farm laborer named Freling Peck who would also join the Third Michigan.

John stood 5’7” with hazel eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion and was 17 years old when he enlisted in Company K, joining his older brother James, on March 18, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (Another brother, Alexander, served in the First Michigan Artillery.) John was sick in the hospital from November of 1863 through May of 1864, and had probably returned to duty by the time he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry, upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was wounded and taken prisoner at Hatcher’s Run, Virginia, on October 27, 1864.

There is no further record, although according to the Eagle John “was killed in a skirmish on the 27th of October last,” probably at Hatcher’s Run or Boydton Plank road, Virginia. John may be among the unknown soldiers buried in Petersburg National Cemetery.

No pension seems to be available.

Wednesday, January 07, 2009

Ralph Hanley

Ralph Hanley was born on May 18, 1842, in Rochester, Monroe County, New York, probably the son of Dewitt (b. 1815) and stepson of Catharine (b. 1830).

Dewitt left New York and probably settled in Michigan sometime in the late 1850s. In any case, by 1860 Dewitt was working as a grocer in Hastings, Barry County, Michigan and living with Catharine (presumably his wife); also living with them was an 18-year-old schoolteacher named Ellen Hawley (b. in New York) and 30-year-old Ada Hawley (b. in New York) and her 1-year-old child Charles (b. in Michigan). That same year Ralph was employed as a servant to one Waterman Parker, a grocer living in Hastings, Barry County. Dewitt was working as a grocer in Hastings in 1863.

Ralph stood 5’7” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 19 years old and living in Barry County when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city.

Ralph eventually enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company E on May 13, 1861. He was on detached service in December of 1862, and serving with the Brigade wagon train from January of 1863 through February and probably through March as well. In April he was with the ambulance train, probably a teamster, and in July was in the ambulance corps.

Ralph reenlisted on December 23 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Paris, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, probably in Michigan, in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He may have been absent sick possibly in February but certainly from March 10, 1864, and he remained absent in a general hospital from April through May. He was reported as a wagoner and still absent sick when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick through December of 1864. He was listed as AWOL in June of 1865 (probably having been on sick furlough), and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana. (He also claimed in later years to have served in Company K, Second U.S. infantry.)

After the war Ralph may have returned to Michigan. (His father and stepmother were living in Hastings in 1870.)

In any case, he was possibly living in Evansville, Indiana where he married Catharine Stacen (d. 1891), on September 17, 1878, and they had at least seven children: Nellie G. (b. 1879), John C. (b. 1880), Edith M. (b. 1881, Mrs. Fraser), David H. (b. 1885), Thomas C. (b. 1886), Gertrude L. (b. 1889), Clara M. (b. 1891)

He may have been living in Olive, Clinton County by 1894. By June of 1906 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association he was living in Evansville, Indiana.

He was an inmate of the National Military Home in Marion, Indiana until he was transferred on October 21, 1907, to the Pacific Branch in Santa Monica, California. He was an inmate of the National Military Home in Santa Monica, California, until he was transferred back on May 10, 1909, to the National Military Home in Marion, Indiana. He was an inmate of the National Military Home in Marion, Indiana until he was transferred on October 21, 1910, to the Pacific Branch in Santa Monica, California. He was discharged from the Pacific branch in April of 1919, and apparently returned to the Marion branch and was listed as being discharged from there on October 2, 1919.

In 1890 he applied for and received a pension (no. 782284).

Ralph still living in the National Home in Santa Monica, California when he died of myocarditis on June 25, 1925, and was buried in Los Angeles National Cemetery: plot 26 2/R.

When Ralph died his daughter Edith was listed as next of kin and living in Armona, California, in 1925.

Monday, January 05, 2009

Hiram and William Haney

Hiram R. Haney, also known as “William W. Harvey,” born on December 18, 1836, in Ohio, son of Hiram (b. 1801) and Hannah (b. 1804).

Hiram was born in Vermont and married New Hampshire native Hannah, and by 1830 were living in New York, in Canada East (Quebec) in 1834 and 1836, they eventually settled in New Hampshire. In any case, Hiram moved his family to New York sometime before 1840 and then on to Ohio and finally to Michigan, sometime between 1842 and 1844, eventually settling in Allegan County.

By 1860 Hiram was working as a farmer and living with his older brother Heman and his family on a farm in Leighton, Allegan County; next door lived his parents and siblings which included another older brother William who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.

Hiram (younger) stood 5’8” with hazel eyes, fair hair and a fair complexion and was 25 years old when he enlisted in Company K (joining William) on August 15, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. Hiram joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, was wounded at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, on July 2, 1863, probably while the Regiment was engaged in the Peach Orchard, and subsequently absent sick in the hospital from July through May of 1864, probably from his wounds.

Hiram eventually recovered and returned to the Regiment. He was probably wounded on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, after which he was again hospitalized. He was still absent in the hospital when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick and on detached service through June (probably in the hospital) of 1864 until he was discharged on June 9, 1865 at Washington, DC.

Hiram returned to Michigan after the war. He married Michigan native Isabelle F. Chappell (b. 1844), on November 7, 1866, in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, and they had at least three children: Flora Bell (b. 1867), Charles A. (1870-71) and Wilburt (died in infancy).

By 1870 Hiram was working as a farmer (he owned some $1000 worth of real estate and living with his wife and two children in Norton, Muskegon County.

In 1872 he applied for and received a pension (no. 122929).

Hiram was probably living in Leighton, when he died of lung disease on November 20, 1874, at Leighton, Allegan County, and was buried in Hooker cemetery.

Isabelle received a pension from the time of Hiram’s death until 1876 when she remarried one Joel Clemens in Leighton. Curiously, that same year one William Chappell was listed as the legal guardian of Flora and minor children applied and received pensions (nos. 169985 and 176353, respectively).

William Drew Haney was born in 1832 in Stowe, Vermont or in New Hampshire, son of Hiram (b. 1801) and Hannah (b. 1804).

Hiram was born in Vermont and married New Hampshire native Hannah, and by 1830 were living in New York, in Canada East (Quebec) in 1834 and 1836, they eventually settled in New Hampshire. In any case, Hiram moved his family to New York sometime before 1840 and then on to Ohio and finally to Michigan, sometime between 1842 and 1844, eventually settling in Allegan County. By 1860 William was working as a farmer and living with his family on a farm in Leighton, Allegan County; next door lived an older brother Heman and his family. Living with Heman was their brother Hiram who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.

William stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 29 years old and may have been working in the vicinity of Hastings, Barry County (or he may have been a farmer in Leighton) when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city.

William eventually enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861 (Hiram R. would join him in 1862). He was taken sick with “remittent’ fever in the summer of 1861 while the regiment was in quarters near Washington, DC, and was hospitalized on August 23 at the Union Hotel hospital in Georgetown. He returned to duty on September 1. William was reported as a company cook in January and February of 1862, and on April 2 or 3, 1862, he was sick in Chesapeake hospital at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, suffering from “catarrhus.” On May 24 he was transferred to Washington where he was admitted on May 25 to Judiciary Square hospital suffering from chronic diarrhea. He remained hospitalized until he was discharged for pneumonia on June 12, 1862, at Judiciary Square hospital, Washington, DC.

After his discharge William returned to Michigan and by about July 1, 1862, was back in Grand Rapids staying at the home of his brother George Haney. According to Henry Haney, an older brother, during the late spring and summer of 1864 William “was engaged in the occupation of peddling maps through Allegan and the adjourning counties, traveling while doing this in a buggy or light-wagon.”

He stayed with George until he reentered the service as a Sergeant in Company H, Twenty-eighth Michigan infantry on September 20, 1864, at Portage, Kalamazoo County, for 3 years, crediting Waterloo, Jackson County, and was mustered the same day at Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County where the regiment was being organized. The regiment left Michigan for Louisville, Kentucky October 26-29 and remained on duty there until November 10. It participated in the battle of Nashville and subsequently occupied Nashville. The Twenty-eighth moved back to Louisville in mid-January of 1865 and on January 18 was moved to Alexandria, Louisiana where it remained until February 19.

The regiment was eventually transferred to New Berne, North Carolina in late February. It participated in the campaign in the Carolinas from March 1-April 26, the advance on and occupation of Raleigh, North Carolina in mid-April, the surrender of Johnston’s army and subsequently on duty at Raleigh until August. In May of 1865 William was on furlough from May 30 through June, and he was mustered out with the regiment on June 5, 1866 at Raleigh, North Carolina.

William returned to Grand Rapids after the war and for three years lived with George Haney. About 1869 he moved west. He was living near Sedan (then) Howard County (and now) Chautauqua County, Kansas, from about September of 1870 to May of 1876, “breaking prairie” in partnership with one Thomas Darnell and moved to Ouray County, Colorado in October of 1876.

He was married and divorced.

William married Missouri native Martha Matilda Darnell (1852-1911), on August 13, 1871, probably in Kansas, and they had at least four children: George (b. 1874), May (b. 1875), Joseph (b. 1877), and Alva (b. 1879). By 1874 and 1875 they were living in Kansas and by 1878 and 1879 had settled in Colorado.

By 1880 William was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Park, Ouray County, Colorado. He was living in Duray (?) County, Colorado in 1888. By 1908 he was living in Cripple Creek, Colorado. He remained in Colorado until about 1911 when he moved to California, settling in Corning, Tehamo County.

In 1880 William applied for and received a pension (no. 317138), drawing$12 in 1882 and $16 per month by 1885.

William was probably living with his son Leo D. Haney, in Corning or Chico, California where he was probably living when he died on October 27, 1912, and was reportedly buried in Chico cemetery.

Sunday, January 04, 2009

Michael H. Handley

Michael H. Handley, also known as “Hanley,” was born in 1828 in Ireland.

Michael immigrated to the United States and was probably the same Michael “Hanley” who was working as a day laborer, unable to read or write and living in Lansing’s Second Ward, Ingham County, Michigan by 1860.

Michael, who was unable to read or write, stood 5’5” with blue eyes, gray hair and a florid complexion and was a 33 year-old farmer probably living in Ingham County when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. He allegedly deserted on June 13, 1861, at Detroit, the day the Regiment passed through that city on its way to Washington. However, on August 1, 1861, Frank Siverd of Company G informed the Lansing Republican of several mistakes in a recent issue of the paper, among them “The printer made Hendley [Handley] deserter in Detroit, . . . Everybody knows Mike.” (inferring perhaps that Handley would never do such a thing?)

And in fact Handley had not deserted but had been transferred to the Third Ohio infantry, commanded by Colonel Isaac Morrow, by order of Michigan Adjutant General John Robertson of Detroit. (The reasons for this are unknown) In any case, Michael was mustered into Company B, Third Ohio infantry at Camp Dennison, near Cincinnati, Ohio, on June 13, 1861, and probably joined the company on June 25 at Benwood, outside of Wheeling in western Virginia. The Third Ohio was involved in McClellan’s campaign in western Virginia July 6-17, 1861: at Middle Fork Bridge, July 6-7 and Rich Mountain July 10-11. On September 8 Frank Siverd wrote to the editor of the Republican informing him that “We had a communication a few days since from Michael Handley. He left our Regiment at Detroit, by mistake, and General Robertson sent him on with the Ohio 3d, which went to Western Virginia, instead of to Washington. Mike was in most of the battles during McClellan's brilliant career in the West, and has consequently seen more service than we have. It seems to us that he should have been reported to our Regiment instead of being a deserter.”

The Third Ohio was posted in various locations in Kentucky through February of 1862 when they moved to Nashville, Tennessee, which they occupied, from February 25 to March 17. They advanced on Murfreesboro, Tennessee, March 17-19, undertook a reconnaissance to Shelbyville and Tullahoma, Alabama, March 25-28, moving to Fayetteville on April 7 and Huntsville, Alabama April 10-11, which the Union forces captured on April 11. Fleeing rebels were pursued to Decatur, Alabama, April 11-14, and the Regiment saw action at Bridgport on April 27 and West Bridge near Bridgport, April 29. The Third Ohio remained on duty at Huntsville until August 23 when they marched to Louisville, Kentucky in pursuit of Confederate General Braxton Bragg, from August 23 to September 25. The pursuit continued from October 1-15.

Michael was present for duty with the Third Ohio from January of 1862 through August, and was wounded in the right side of his chest on October 8, 1862, at the battle of Perryville (or Chaplin Hills), Kentucky. He was discharged on March 3, 1863, at hospital no. 7 in Perryville for a gunshot to the chest, “the ball entering the middle lob of the right lung so injuring him as to render him unfit for military duty.” According to a statement he gave in July of 1863, the ball that had wounded him at Perryville had remained lodged “near the union of 9th rib and spinal column.”

It appears in April of 1863 Michael applied for and received a pension (no. 16736).

Although he gave Detroit as his mailing address on his discharge paper, Michael quite probably returned to Ohio and was possibly living in the Newark, Licking County area when he applied for enlistment in the Veterans’ Reserve Corps (also known as the “Invalid Corps”) on July 7, 1863. On July 10, Major Charles Johnson, of the VRC in Columbus, Ohio, “respectfully returned” Michael’s application. According to Major Johnson Handley was “‘not meritorious and deserving’ as he was so drunk when he arrived at this office that he could not stand.”

Interestingly, Michael, who was probably working as a laborer in Ohio, reentered the Third Ohio infantry in Company B on December 30, 1863, at Newark, Licking County, Ohio, crediting Newark’s Third Ward. He received $60.00 bounty and $13.00 advance on his pay. Michael was present for duty from January of 1864 through April, and reported as company cook from February through May. He was probably still present for duty when Company B was mustered out of service at Camp Dennison, Ohio, in June of 1864. Michael was subsequently transferred to Unassigned, Twenty-fourth Ohio infantry on June 8, at Chattanooga, Tennessee, probably to complete his term of service. He was reported as a straggler as of November 11, 1864, at Atlanta, Georgia and was quite possibly under arrest at Columbus, Ohio, as of February 7, 1865.

There is no further record.

Saturday, January 03, 2009

William Hanchett

William Hanchett was born in 1839 in Michigan, the son of Charles (b. 1803) and Abby Ann (Ives, b. 1811).

New York native Charles married Connecticut born Abby in Portage County, Ohio and was living in Portage County in 1830. Charles eventually settled in Michigan sometime before 1839; indeed by 1840 Charles was probably living in Eaton, Eaton County. By 1860 William was living with his family on a farm in Castleton, Barry County. (Charles married his second wife, Lucina Winn Boddy in 1864 in Eaton County, Michigan.)

In any case, William was 22 years old and possibly living in the vicinity of Hastings, Barry County (or in Eaton County), when he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city; William eventually enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861.

He was reported on detached duty serving as a teamster, probably at Brigade headquarters, in July of 1862 and in September. He was a saddler from October through December of 1862, serving with the Brigade wagon train from January of 1863 through July, and a teamster detached with the Third Brigade Quartermaster department from September 19, 1863 through March of 1864. By April he was a clerk at Brigade headquarters, in May he had returned to the Brigade wagon train, and he was mustered out of service on June 20, 1864.

It is not known if William returned to Michigan. He was possibly working as a common laborer and living as a single man in Paisley, Lake County, Oregon; his younger brother (?) James was living in Summer Lake, Lake County, Oregon.

William applied for and received a pension (no. 968721), drawing $6 by 1899.

By 1891 William was living in Arlington, Washington state, and he was living in Adelaide, Kings County, Washington in 1895.

Friday, January 02, 2009

Marshall Hammond

Marshall Hammond was born in 1844 in La Porte, La Porte County, Indiana.

Marshall left Indiana and moved north to Michigan sometime before 1860 when he was working as a day laborer and mechanic working with John Holland, a railroad worker, in Ovid, Clinton County, and probably living at the Railroad Hotel in Ovid.

Marshall stood 5’7” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion, and was 17 years old and possibly living in Ingham County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to Benjamin Hammond and George Hammond, both of whom would also enlist in Company D.)

Marshall was discharged on July 29, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia, due to “general debility subsequent to rubeola (measles).”

No pension seems to be available.

Thursday, January 01, 2009

James A. Hammond

James A. Hammond was born in 1842, in Michigan, the son of Carmi (b. 1810) and Mary A. (b. 1817)

Both New York natives, his parents moved from New York and settled in Michigan sometime before 1838, and by 1850 James was attending school with his siblings and living on the family farm in Essex Township, Clinton County. By 1860 James was attending school with five of his younger siblings and still living with his family on a farm in Essex.

James was 16 years old and living in Essex or St. Johns, Clinton County in 1861 when he enlisted in Company D (his cousin Benjamin enlisted in Company G), presumably with his parent’s consent.

James was mustered into state service on May 13, 1861, but was never mustered into federal service on June 10, since he was drowned in the Grand River on Sunday, May 26, 1861. It had rained a bit that morning when the Regiment was marched from Cantonment Anderson to “the Grand River, at some distance below Hovey's Ware House, West Side,” and Hammond “was suddenly taken with cramps, and before assistance could reach him, was drowned. His body was soon recovered, and every effort made at reuscitation [sic], but without avail.”

On May 27 Frank Siverd a member of Company G described what happened

Yesterday forenoon an accident occurred that cast a gloom over the whole camp. The Regiment was marched to the River to bathe; while several hundred men were in the water, James Hammond, a cousin of B. F. Hammond, and a member of the Boston Light Guard was seized with a cramp, and in the midst of his comrades, sunk in twelve feet of water. Consternation seized the whole of them and they fled to the shore leaving him to his fate. Allen S. Shattuck, of the [Williams’] Rifles [i.e., Company G], though at some rods distance rushed to him, and though unsuccessful, certainly deserves credit for the effort made to rescue him, He was the only person that made an effort. -- The body was recovered after a delay of forty minutes, by Mr. George Garner, of the Muskegon Rangers. Unsuccessful efforts were made under the direction of Lieutenant [Robert] Jeffords [Jefferds], M.D., of the Rifles, at resuscitation. Six hundred men went out in the morning full of hilarity and joy, and returned a few hours later in gloom and sorrow. It was surprising what a change the presence of death wrought. Mr. Hammond was from St. Johns. He was universally liked by those who knew him -- his remains will be sent home under a proper military escort.

A Grand Rapids correspondent for the Detroit Daily Advertiser wrote that Hammond “gave evidence of making a good soldier. This is the second death that has occurred since the quartering of the Regiment here. His funeral will be attended to-morrow (Monday) unless orders to the contrary shall be received from his parents.” The Enquirer reported on Wednesday that “His body was conveyed to St. Johns in the Monday morning train of cars, accompanied by Captain Houghton [commanding Company D] and a file of 8 men.” James was presumably buried in Essex.

His parents were living in St. Johns, Bingham Township, Clinton County in 1870.