Friday, May 29, 2009

Andrew Gould and James Kilpatrick

Andrew Gould Kilpatrick was born on June 14, 1842, in Newmilns, Ayrshire, Scotland, the son of John (b. 1798) and Janet or Genet (Wiley, 1797-1878).

His parents were married in Loudon, Scotland on either February 28 or March 6, 1819, and Andrew was the youngest of eleven children. John brought his family to the United States in 1847, arriving in Rochester, New York in September, and eventually settling in western Michigan, spending one winter in Hastings, Barry County.

In fact, their oldest son, John Jr. had preceded them to Michigan and by 1850 had settled in Woodland Township, Barry County. John Sr. settled his family in Woodland and became a U.S. citizen on October 16, 1851. He was elected Town Treasurer in 1853, in 1859, he built a sawmill on Mud Creek, in section 23 of Woodland Twp and was elected Justice of the Peace in 1874 and 1878. Andrew and the other younger children probably attended school in Vermontville, Bary County, in the late 1850s. By 1860 Andrew was a farmer living with his family in Woodland, Barry County.

Andrew stood 5’8” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion, and was 19 years old and still residing in Barry County when, along with his older brother James, he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city. Andrew eventually enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company E on May 13, 1861, along with his brother James. (They would be joined by their brother-in-law Robert Barry, in 1864.)

Shortly after the regiment arrived in Washington in mid-June of 1861, Andrew began keeping a diary, which he maintained erratically until the end of the war.

In late September (probably on the 28th) Andrew was taken ill, and on November 20 he was sent to Columbia College hospital in Washington. He left Columbia hospital on December 6 when he was transferred to the Mansion hospital in Alexandria, Virginia. He returned to camp on December 30 and was subsequently sent to the regimental hospital on January 4, 1862.

By early spring of 1862 Andrew was sick at home in Barry County, according to Lieutenant Abraham Whitney, who was in Michigan recruiting for the Third Michigan, and who knew Kilpatrick. Whitney wrote to Detroit from Lowell, Kent County on March 24, 1862, that “Andrew Kilpatrick, a private in company E of the Michigan Third Infantry who has been home on a sick furlough has applied to me for a pass back to the Regiment. He says he cannot get money to take him back and I think that is probably the case, for I have known him since last spring and can recommend him as an honest truthful boy. He lives in the town of Woodland, Ionia [sic] County and thinks he can get some more boys to come with him. Can I give him a free pass to Detroit and can he be sent through with the next detachment of recruits?”

Andrew eventually rejoined the Regiment and was probably wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. He was absent sick in the hospital in August of 1862, but had rejoined the Regiment by January 1 of 1863, when he resumed his diary entries.

On January 12, Andrew took over cooking duties for the company, since the company cook was taken ill, and he resumed his cooking duties after the regiment returned to camp in mid-May of 1863, following the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia. Indeed, he was present for duty with the regiment during the battles of Chancellorsville on May 3 and Gettysburg on July 2 (the second day of the battle). In late August Andrew accompanied the Third Michigan to New York for the upcoming draft. The regiment spent more than two weeks in New York City and Troy, New York, and by the end of September the Third had returned to Virginia.

On December 21 Andrew was examined by the regimental surgeon, Dr. James Grove and he officially reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Caledonia, Kent County.

At about 7:00 a.m. on December 28 Andrew along with the other reenlistees, left the regimental camp near Brandy Station, Virginia. They spent the first night at the Soldiers’ Retreat (now the Soldier’s Home) near Washington. They left Baltimore at 8:00 a.m. on the 29th, changed trains at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, stopped for supper at Altoona and reached Pittsburgh before dawn on December 30. They proceeded directly on to Cleveland, taking the better part of the day. On December 31 they headed to Toledo where they arrived at about 4:00 p.m. Due to heavy snowfall the trip goes very slowly, and the “veterans” do not leave Toledo until New Year’s Day at about 9:00 a.m. They spend January 2 stuck in the snow aboard the train and at last arrive in Grand Rapids by January 3. Andrew spends the 4th in Grand Rapids, picks up his furlough (apparently) from the Provost Marshal’s office (presumably) and goes to Ada in Kent County where he meets his brother James. The following day, January 5 he returned to Grand Rapids and on January 6 heads for his family’s home in Barry County.

While at home Andrew visited numerous friends and family in Barry County and in Kalamazoo. On the 5th he returned to Grand Rapids and stayed at the Barnard House. He continued to visit with friends in Kent and Ionia counties until February 10 when, after receiving his state bounty for $150 he left for Detroit aboard the 7;00 p.m. train. He arrived in Detroit at 10:00 in the morning on the 11th, left for Toledo at 11:00 a.m., arriving at 2:00 p.m. On February 12 he left Toledo at 3:00 a.m., arrived in Cleveland at 9:30 in he morning, left an hour late and arrived in Pittsburgh at about 10:30 that night. He ate supper at the Soldier’s Retreat, hosted by the citizens of Pittsburgh. He left Pittsburgh at 3:15 a.m., ate breakfast in Altoona at 8:00 a.m., arrived in Harrisburg at 1:00 p.m. and left for Baltimore at 3:00 p.m.

Andrew arrived in Baltimore around daylight on the 14th. He arrived in Washington at 5:00 p.m., stayed at the Soldier’s Retreat and at last headed for the regiment’s camp on February 16 at about 6:00 a.m. He rode “on top of a carload of hay in a furious storm of wind and snow.” He arrived at camp at 3:00 p.m. where he was “heartily welcomed back by our old comrades.”

On Thursday, March 10, 1864, Andrew woke up with “A very sore throat from the effects of a bad cold.” Two days later he was taken sick with “a heavy fever with pains in the head and temples.” The following day, March 13, Dr. James Grove, the regimental surgeon, told Andrew that his illness “is a sort of ague fit.”

He was reportedly wounded in early May and was transferred as a Corporal to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Andrew returned to Michigan and bought his father’s farm in Woodland.

On October 20, 1867, he married Michigan native Sarah Ann Cole (b. 1849 in Woodland), in Barry County, and they had at least seven children: Decina (b. 1869), Nellie M. (b. 1871), Emmett (b. 1875), George Gould (b. 1882), Andrew Vernon (b. 1886), Agnes (b. 1890) and Jennie F. (b. 1891).

By 1880 Andrew was working as a farmer and living with his wife and family in Woodland. In 1883 they moved from Woodland to Shelby, Brown County, Dakota Territory (now South Dakota). In fact, Andrew spent his remaining years in South Dakota. By 1907 Andrew was living in Houghton, South Dakota and was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1913 he was living in South Dakota when he was appointed by then-Governor Francis Byrne as an official delegate from the state to the 50th reunion of the veterans of the battle of Gettysburg. By 1916 he was residing in Houghton South Dakota and in 1920 he was living in Shelby, Brown County, South Dakota.

In 1914 he applied for and received a pension (no. 1099029).

Andrew died in Houghton on April 23, 1923, and was presumably buried in Houghton.

In 1923 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 935243).

James Kilpatrick was born on January 4, 1840, in New Milns, Ayrshire, Scotland, the son of John (b. 1798) and Janet (1797-1878).

James was the second to the youngest of eleven children. His parents were married in Loudon, Scotland on either February 28 or March 6, 1819, and John brought his family to the United States in 1847, arriving in Rochester, New York in September, and eventually settling in western Michigan, spending one winter in Hastings, Barry County. In fact, their oldest son, John Jr. had preceded them to Michigan and by 1850 had settled in Woodland Township, Barry County. John Sr. settled his family in Woodland and became a U.S. citizen on October 16, 1851. He was elected Town Treasurer in 1853, in 1859, he built a sawmill on Mud Creek, in section 23 of Woodland Twp and was elected Justice of the Peace in 1874 and 1878. James and the other younger children probably attended school in Vermontville, Barry County, in the late 1850s. By 1860 James was a farm laborer living with his family in Woodland, Barry County.

James stood 5’8” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was 21 years old and still residing in Barry County when, along with his younger brother Andrew, he enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. The company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids and its members distributed to other companies of the Third Michigan infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson just south of the city. James eventually enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861, along with his brother Andrew. (They would be joined by their brother-in-law Robert Barry, in 1864.)

James was absent sick in August of 1862 and discharged on September 29, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, for an inguinal hernia which occurred on July 8, 1862, while he was loading wagons at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

Following his discharge James may have moved to Minnesota, although he eventually returned to Michigan, probably to Barry County.

He married New York-born Adelaide Greenfield (b. 1844), November 7, 1866, in Bedford, Calhoun County, and they had at least four children: Edith (b. 1867), Grace (b. 1873), Della (b. 1876) and Dana (b. 18820.

It is possible that he was living in New York in 1867 when Edith was born. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and daughter Edith in Hastings, Barry County. It is possible that the family was living in Ohio in 1873 when Grace was born.

In any case, he eventually settled in the northern Michigan. By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and two children in Bliss, Emmet County; also living with them was his mother-in-law Mary Greenfield.. He was living in Cross Village, Emmet County in 1883, and he was still living in Cross village in 1888, in 1890 when his pension was increased and in Bliss, Emmett County in 1894.

James was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Richardson Post No. 13 in Harbor Springs, Emmet County. In 1869 he applied for and received a pension (no. 121,958), drawing $4.00 per month in 1883, and increased to $6.00 by 1890.

James died at his home in Bliss Township, Emmett County on July 16, 1899, and was buried in Bliss cemetery: lot 37. (Hugh Kilpatrick who served in the Twenty-first Michigan infantry is also buried in Bliss cemetery.)

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 506774) until 1905 when she remarried John Cook. After Mr. Cook died in 1916 she was possibly living in Barry County when she applied for renewal of her widow’s pension.

Thursday, May 28, 2009

Patrick Kilby

Patrick Kilby was born in 1824 or 1832 in Roscommon, Ireland. (In his admission history to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home in 1889 he claimed he was 65 years old, placing his date of birth at 1824 and making him 37 when he enlisted.)

Patrick left Ireland and immigrated to America, settling in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 37- or 29-year-old laborer who could not read or write, possibly living in Shiawassee County when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. (He is not found in the 1905 Third Michigan Regimental history, although he is listed in the Fifteenth Michigan infantry Regimental history.)

He apparently suffered from “fatigue and exposure” beginning during the battle of Bull Run on July 21, 1861, and in early August of 1861 Patrick was in the hospital with a fever. By early September he was in the general hospital for convalescents at Annapolis, Maryland, suffering from fever and general debility. Patrick was discharged for chronic rheumatism, probably at Annapolis, on October 24, 1861.

After his discharge from the army Patrick returned to Michigan and reentered the service in Company A, Fifteenth Michigan infantry on February 1, 1862, at Detroit for 3 years, and was mustered March 13 at Monroe, Monroe County listing his place of residence as Detroit. On March 14, 1862, he was transferred to Company E at Monroe. The regiment was organized at Detroit, Monroe and Grand Rapids between October 16, 1861 and March 13, 1862, was mustered into service on March 20 and moved to Benton Barracks, Missouri, near St. Louis and then on to Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee, March 27-April 5. It participated in the battle of Shiloh, April 6-7, and in the siege of Corinth April 29-May 30 and in the battle of Corinth October 3-4. It was in garrison and provost duty at Grand Junction and Lagrange from November until June of 1863.

Patrick was promoted to Corporal on April 1, 1863, and to Sergeant on June 14, 1863. The regiment was ordered to Vicksburg, Mississippi on June 3 wand participated in the siege and eventually capture of the city June 11-July 4. It then advanced to Jackson, Mississippi, July 4-10 and laid siege July 10-17. It was in camp at Big Black until September when it moved to Memphis and then on to Chattanooga, Tennessee, September 28-November 20. The Fifteenth participated in operations along the Memphis & Charleston railroad in Alabama in October and in the relief of Knoxville November 28-December 8. It was in camp at Scottsboro, Alabama until February of 1864.

He reenlisted on February 2, 1864, at Scottsboro, Alabama, for 3 years, crediting Detroit, Sixth Ward, and was mustered on March 11 at Scottsboro. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough and returned to the Regiment about mid-April. The Fifteenth participated in the Atlanta campaign from May until September, in the March to the Sea November 15-December 10 and the siege of Savannah December 10-21 and in the Campaign in the Carolinas January to April of 1865. It was also involved in the battle of Bentonville, North Carolina March 19-21, in the occupation of Goldsboro and Raleigh, North Carolina and the surrender of Johnston’s army. It subsequently marched to Washington April 29-May19 and participate d in the Grand Review on May 24, after which it was moved to Louisville, Kentucky June 1-6, and then on to Little Rock, Arkansas on June 28 where it remained on duty until August 13.

Patrick may have been wounded in the hip during his term of service in the Fifteenth. In any case, he was honorably discharged with the regiment on August 13, 1865, at Little Rock.

After the war Patrick returned to western Michigan and for a time lived in Grand Rapids where he worked as a laborer. He was admitted as a widower to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 1053) on July 11, 1889, and while a resident of the Home he became a member of the Home Grand Army of the Republic Logan Post No. 1.

In 1889 he applied for and received a pension (no. 781675).

Patrick was in and out of the Home several times between 1889 and 1895, and for reasons unknown was eventually admitted to the Northwestern Branch National Military Home in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Patrick was probably still living at the Home in Milwaukee when he was struck by a trolley car or train car and killed on February 6, 1902. He was buried in Wood National Cemetery, Milwaukee: section 15, grave 206.

Wednesday, May 27, 2009

George B. Kibbee

George B. Kibbee was born on January 3, 1840, in Pulaski, Oswego County, New York.

George left New York and came to Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’6” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old blacksmith and boatman possibly living in Montcalm County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was wounded in the left arm on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, resulting in the amputation of the limb, and by mid-July he was a patient at Stewart’s Mansion hospital in Baltimore, reported to be “nearly well.” On July 15, 1862, he was discharged at Baltimore for “amputation of left arm near the shoulder having had it shattered in the battle of Fair Oaks.”

After his discharged George eventually returned to Michigan where he reentered the service in the Veterans’ Reserve Corps on July 11, 1863, at Detroit for 3 years. He served in the Seventy-third Company, Second Battalion, VRC, and was present with the VRC, probably in Detroit, through the end of April of 1864. Although he reportedly deserted on June on June 9, 1864, from Washington Park hospital in Cincinnati, Ohio, he was also reported as int he hospital receiving a “false arm” on June 30, 1864reportedly deserted on June 6, 1864.

George eventually returned to western Michigan, married Ada V. Dunbar (d. 1913), on June 4, 1867, at Millbrook, Mecosta County, and they had at least three children: Nelson (b. 1868), Charles (b. 1870) and Emily (b. 1875). George and Ada were divorced in 1901 and remarried on August 10, 1905 in Boyne City, Charlevoix County.

For many years George worked as a blacksmith (although he only had one arm). He resided in Lakeview, Montcalm County in 1883 when he was drawing $24.00 per month for loss of his arm (pension no. 10,411, dated probably 1863), and $55 per month by 1909.

He was still living in Lakeview in December of 1888 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. By 1889 George had moved to Sylvester, Mecosta County, and in 1890 he was residing in Altona, Mecosta County and in 1894 in Hinton, Mecosta County. He also resided for a time in Howard City, Mecosta County.

George was possibly living in Boyne City, Charlevoix County where he died on January 21, 1909, and was buried in Riverside cemetery, Mt. Pleasant, Isabella County: lot 1, block 132, grave no. 3. Charlevoix County paid for the casket and hearse; but it is unclear if they also paid for transportation to Isabella County for burial.

Ada was living in Boyne City, Charlevoix County, in February of 1909 when she applied for a pension (no. 914112); it was rejected and subsequently abandoned and no certificate was ever issued. She remained in Boyne City where she worked as a housekeeper until she died in 1913; the County paid for her funeral expenses as well.

Tuesday, May 26, 2009

Jerome N. Kibbe

Jerome N. Kibbe was born in 1833 in Montgomery, Orange County, New York.

In 1850 there was a 21-year-old laborer named Jerome Kibbe living with and/or working for one Allen Higly (?) in Windsor, Ashtabula County, Ohio. In any case, Jerome had probably just moved to Michigan from Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio when war broke out.

Jerome stood 5’11” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was a 28-year-old carriage-maker possibly living in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. By June of 1862 he was reported to be suffering from debility in a hospital in Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, but he soon recovered and rejoined the Regiment. He shot himself accidentally in the right hand, probably in July or August of 1862, resulting in the loss of the right thumb, and was subsequently hospitalized from August through September of 1862.

It is possible that Jerome rejoined the Regiment and was promoted to Sergeant, or he may have been confined to his quarters or perhaps in the Regimental hospital as a result of his wound until he was discharged for disability as a Sergeant on December 9, 1862, at a camp, possibly Camp Pitcher, near Falmouth, Virginia.

It is not known if Jerome ever returned to Michigan.

Jerome eventually returned to Ohio.

He was married to New York native Amelia B. (b. 1847), and they had at least three children: Carrie (b. 1871) Guy A. (b. 1875) and Ray J. (b. 1878); all born in Ohio.

By 1880 Jerome was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Geneva, Ashtabula County, Ohio. He was living in Geneva, Ohio in 1887 and 1911.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1880 (?) he applied for and received a pension (no. 356683).

He probably died in 1917.

In 1917 (?) his wife was living in Ohio when she applied for a widow’s pension (application no. 887433), but the certificate was never granted.

Monday, May 25, 2009

George S. Keytes

George S. Keytes was born on October 11, 1840, probably in Riga, Monroe County, New York, the son of William H. (b. 1808) and Ellen (b. 1810).

George’s parents were both born in England. By 1821 they had immigrated to America, married and settled in New York where they resided for some years. George’s family moved from New York to Michigan sometime after 1847, and by 1860 George was living with his family in Owosso’s First Ward, Shiawassee County, where his father worked as a saddler.

George stood 5’11” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 20 years old and probably still working in Owosso as a farmer when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. George was present for duty from at least January of 1862 through June of 1863 (although he probably suffered a bout of dysentery from May 9 to May 12, 1863). He was shot in the left arm and shoulder on July 2, 1863, while the regiment was engaged in the Peach Orchard, during the second day of the battle of Gettysburg, and subsequently hospitalized in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was mistakenly listed as having died of his wounds on July 3.

George was on furlough for 45 days from August 16, 1863, probably from the hospital, and returned to the hospital on or about September 29. Although George was returned to duty on November 30, in fact he probably never rejoined the Regiment. On February 6, 1864, he was examined by a medical board and placed under observation, possibly in a hospital in Washington. He was treated for “remittent fever” from February 8 until he was discharged on May 1, 1864, at Harewood hospital in Washington, DC.

After he was discharged from the army George probably returned to Michigan -- he gave Owosso as his mailing address on his discharge paper -- and by 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his parents in Owosso’s First Ward. He was probably still living in Owosso when he was confined to the Kalamazoo State Hospital for the Insane “for treatment” of an unknown mental illness on June 2, 1874. He was listed as a patient of the hospital in 1880 and although

George was reported to be living in Owosso in 1883 when he was drawing $4.00 per month for a wounded left arm (pension no. 38,815, dated 1865). In fact he was probably still a patient at Kalamazoo and at some point he was placed under the guardianship of George Loring (his brother-in-law?). He was still in the hospital in 1890, but by 1912 was a resident of the St. Joseph Retreat in Dearborn, Wayne County and under the guardianship of one Clayton Loring.

George died on June 16, 1921, presumably in Michigan.

Sunday, May 24, 2009

Abram, Ketchum

Abram, Ketchum was born in 1823 in New York, the son of Lewis K. and Elizabeth (Becker).

Abram married New York native Aseneth (1823-1880), probably in New York, and they had at least three children: Jerome (b. 1850) and two others who died in August and October of 1863.

Abram and his wife were living in New York in 1850 when their son was born but eventually moved westward and sometime in the late 1850s had settled in Michigan. Abram was probably living in western Michigan in 1857 when he purchased 80 acres of land through the Ionia land office.

Abram stood 5’10” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 39-year-old farmer possibly living in Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company G on February 23, 1862, at Saranac or Boston, Ionia County for 3 years, and was mustered on February 25 (or 28) at Detroit.

On August 5, 1862 Abram was admitted to the hospital at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia, “though not dangerously sick,” suffering from chronic diarrhea.

He allegedly deserted on September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. In fact he was put about the steamer Elm City on August 10 and sent to the hospital at Chester, Pennsylvania. He was admitted to the Chester hospital on August 12 suffering from hemorrhoids and was returned to duty on December 12, 1862. He arrived at Camp Distribution, Virginia on December 16, was examined by the medical board at the Convalescent Camp in Alexandria and was found to be suffering from fever and entered the Post Hospital, at the camp on January 3, 1863. He returned to the Regiment on April 10, 1863, at Camp Sickles, Virginia.

Abram was reported either missing in action or having deserted on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and he “returned from desertion” on February 14, 1864, at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and placed under arrest as a deserter. He was subsequently court-martialed at Johnson’s House, Virginia on February 19, 1864.

Specifically, he was charged with having deserted from Camp Parole at Annapolis, Maryland on or about May 8, 1863 “and did not return until arrested and brought back under guard” to the regiment at Camp Bullock, Virginia, on February 14, 1864. Corporal Philo Weir testified that he and Abram were both taken prisoner on May 3, 1863 and taken to Richmond where they remained together as prisoners until paroled and they were both together briefly at Camp Parole, Maryland. Weir was asked by the Judge Advocate what he knew of Abram’s status at Camp Parole. “He left there pretty soon,” Weir answered, “ the next day I think after he got there but I don’t know how he left or whether he got a furlough.” Abram then asked the witness if he was positive he went away the day they arrived in Maryland. Weir answered he was not positive.

Question by defendant: Do you remember of my being sick about the time we arrived at the camp?

Answer: I think I do remember of your being sick about that time.

Major M. B. Houghton of the Third Michigan infantry (and a member of the court) was then called to the stand by the prosecution.

Question: Do you recollect seeing him [the defendant] in the state of Michigan during the present months?

Answer: I do.

Question: Did you have any conversation with him?

Answer: I did.

Question: Will you state what that was.

Answer: He asked me when his company was and I told him in Lansing Michigan. He said he was anxious to get with his company again. He asked me if he had been exchanged. And I told him he had been.

Question; Did he tell you anything about leaving Camp Parole?

Answer: He did not that I now recollect.

Question: Did you see him at any other time in Michigan?

Answer: I did – I saw him last August [1863] at my house in Saranac. He then asked me if he was exchanged and said he was very anxious to get back to the Regt. I do not recollect much of the conversation. I was sick. I do mot remember that he told me how long he had been home. I have never had any other conversation with him nor seen him at any other time. I did not hear him say anything of his being arrested.

Question: Do you know when the exchange was made?

Answer: I think it was in the first of September last.

Question: Did you inform the prisoner of that fact?

Answer: I did in my conversation with him in January.

After being cross-examined briefly by the defendant, Abram asked for a recess until February 25, which was granted.

Abram then submitted a statement in his defense.

Had it been my intention to desert the service of the U.S. I could have reached Canada within six hours but that I never did desert or intended to do so. I think [it] is clearly shown . . . that I was ready and anxious to join my regiment. I have never failed to do my duty as a soldier and during my absence have lived in the community where my Regt was organized expecting to join it as soon as exchanged. I trust that this Honorable Court will take into consideration the fact that I was on my way to join my company at Lansing Mich when I was arrested. Had the charge been absent without leave my plea would have been guilty but not guilty of desertion. One excuse which I have to offer is that severe sickness in my family which resulted in the death of one of my children in the month of august and another in the month of October made me quite anxious to remain after the death & burial of my children. I tried several times to ascertain if I had been exchanged that I might return to my Regt and to duty and I am now here guilty of absence without leave but not of desertion.

Abram was found guilty but the charge of “did desert” was struck and “did absent himself without leave” was inserted instead. He was ordered to forfeit six months’ pay and make good the six months’ time he was absent.

In May he was absent sick in the hospital, and was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Regiments on June 10, 1864. He remained absent sick through December of 1864, and probably until he was discharged on May 31 or June 2, 1865, near Washington, DC.

After the war Abram returned to Ionia County where he lived for some years. By 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned some $2000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and son in South Cass, Odessa Township, Ionia County, and in 1880 Abram was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Boston, Ionia County.

Abram eventually moved out west and by 1887 he had settled in the Dakota Territory when he applied for and received a pension (no. 398,823), drawing $12 per month by 1906. He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

He was living in South Dakota when he married his second wife, the widow Mrs. Annie Palmer (d. 1912), on July 28, 1888, possibly in Clear Lake, Duel County, South Dakota.

According to his second wife, they lived together until about June of 1892 when Abram left her and returned to Ionia County, Michigan. She added “that the reasons for his leaving was a disagreement between his stepson William Palmer and himself and . . . that before his leaving she requested him to stay and live with her . . . but he refused to do so.” Nor did Abram “try to conceal his place of residence and at intervals did inform his wife . . . of his whereabouts and health” but “that after he entered the soldiers’ home at Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 1902, he stopped all correspondence and from that time on she never heard from him.” However she further claimed that there was never any divorce. In fact however, Abram did divorce Margaret after he returned to Ionia County.

By 1894 Abram was in Saranac, in Lake Odessa in 1897 and back in Saranac by 1898. On January 3, 1902, he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 3968).

Abram died of “old age” at 4:00 a.m. on April 12, 1906, and was buried in the Home cemetery: section 4, row 19, grave 30.

In May of 1909 his widow was living in South Dakota when she applied for and received a pension (no. 701795). She was probably living in Clear Lake, South Dakota, when she died in 1912.

Saturday, May 23, 2009

Hugh Kerr

Hugh Kerr was born on February 2, 1839, in New York City.

Hugh left New York and came to Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a florid complexion and was a 22-year-old laborer and mill hand living in Muskegon, Muskegon County when he enlisted as a Musician in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was reported AWOL in August of 1862, but in fact by the second week of September he was a patient in Washington Street hospital in Alexandria, Virginia, having suffered a contusion and was reportedly “doing well.

Hugh was on detached service in October, and sick in the Regimental hospital from November of 1862 through January of 1863. He was discharged on February 5, 1863, at Third Corps hospital near Fort Lyon, Virginia, for valvular heart disease “caused by being run over by a caisson at the Battle of Bull Run [Second Bull Run] Aug. 29, 1862.”

Apparently Hugh returned to his family home in New York City where he reentered the service in the United States Marine Corps on June 9, 1863, for 4 years, and was transferred on August 1, 1863, to the Marine Battalion at Port Royal, South Carolina; he was subsequently transferred to the USS Canandaigua on November 29, 1863. By the summer of 1864 he was taken sick and transferred to Norfolk Naval Hospital on July 14, 1864, and was discharged for disability from Norfolk on either September or December 5, 1864.

After he was discharged from the Marines Hugh returned to western Michigan and was working as a lumberman and living in Whitehall, Muskegon County in 1870 when he married Minnie Sickman (1844-1926) on October 22, 1870, in Muskegon. They had at least one child, a son Richard Henry (b. 1871 or 1872).

By 1880 he was working in a mill in White River, Muskegon County, and living with his wife and son. He was working as a sawyer and living in Montague, Muskegon County in 1888 when he became a member of Grand Army of the Republic Henry Post No. 3 in Montague, and he received pension no. 836,303. He was still living in Montague in 1889 and 1890 and working as a foreman for the Montague Basket Company and also as a fruit grower. He was living in Muskegon Heights in 1894, but by November of 1897 he had settled in Fitzgerald, Ben Hill County, Georgia.

Fitzgerald had a curious and unusual origin and Hugh apparently played a role in its birth. According to one writer,

The town’s namesake, Philander Fitzgerald, was a Civil War drummer who later became a pension attorney and publisher of a veteran’s newspaper in Indiana. When a severe drought hit the Midwest in the early 1890s, Fitzgerald concocted a novel idea. “Why not start a soldier’s colony in the Southland and get all those old boys away from the bitter winters and drought?”

As the farm crisis deepened, calls went out for help. The first to respond was the state of Georgia, which sent a trainload of food for both farmers and their livestock. Fitzgerald sensed an opening and wrote to Georgia’s governor about his dream of a Southern colony. Though a rebel veteran, the governor wanted to develop his own state’s underpopulated farmland. So he invited Fitzgerald for a visit. The two men settled on a turpentine camp in the virgin pine forests of south-central Georgia.

Fitzgerald promoted the colony in his newspaper, sold shares in the venture, and bought several thousand acres in Georgia. Then, in the summer of 1895, 2,700 Northern veterans and their families trekked South, many of them in wagon trains. At first, the pine barren to which they’d decamped seemed as bleak as the dustbowl farms they’d left behind. Nor were the natives uniformly friendly. One foe of the project blasted the colony as “a blot on the fair state of Georgia,” and several landowners refused to sell the newcomers property.

But the “pioneers” planted crops, established a settlement, and invited Georgians from the surrounding countryside to a festival celebrating the colony’s first Southern harvest [in 1896]. “The organizers were worried about hotheads on both sides so they planned two parades, one for Union veterans, the other for Confederates.” But when the band began playing, veterans of the two armies spontaneously joined and marched through the town together. Thereafter, they merged to form Battalion One of the Blue and Gray and celebrated their reconciliation annually.

In 1863 Hugh applied for and received a pension (no. 836303.

Hugh probably remained in Fitzgerald until he died of paralysis on April 15, 1912, and was buried in Evergreen cemetery in Fitzgerald.

His widow was living in Georgia in April of 1912 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 743467).

Friday, May 22, 2009

David Kernehan

David Kernehan was born in 1840.

David was 21 years old when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861, at Grand Rapids, Michigan, for three years, and was mustered on June 10.

On July 3, 1861, barely three weeks after the Third Michigan left Michigan and arrived outside of Washington, DC, at the Chain Bridge near Georgetown, David apparently atemted to desert. George W. Bailey of Company F, wrote to the editor of the Allegan Journal on July 15, that Kernehan “ran the guards last Monday, and went over into Virginia about eight miles, stopped at a house and asked for a drink, which was given him. Soon after drinking he went into spasms. A doctor who lived near by took the fellow in and sent word to our camp that one of our men was poisoned. Some of our men went and took care of him until Friday, and then brought him to camp. He is pretty hard up, don’t know whether he will live or not. The man by whom he was poisoned fled.”

Another member of the Third Michigan, noted that on Wednesday, July 3, 1861, Kernehan “ran the guards” at Camp Blair near Chain Bridge above Georgetown Heights on the Potomac River. Without authorization he left camp and “went some miles into Virginia.”

While there [reported the Grand Rapids Enquirer] he stopped at a house where a Mr. Deevies lives, and asked for a drink of water. There is a striking resemblance between this name and that of his Satanic Majesty [Jefferson Davis]. Well, names in the same family are sometimes slightly changed. This D., or rather Mr. Deevies, gave him the water. After drinking it, the soldier started for the camp. Within 10 minutes after drinking the man was taken with vomiting and spasms. Fortunately, a doctor came that way, saw him, and by extreme exertions saved the man from dying. From the symptoms and facts in this case, our surgeons had no hesitation in pronouncing a case of poisoning from strychnine. He was brought back to camp yesterday, placed in the hospital, and is on a fair way for recovery. The man Deevies was not be found, a day or 2 afterwards, when search was made for him. He is said to be a rank secessionist. If any of our boys get him he will be employed in stopping musket balls the remainder of his life; after which he will undoubtedly be resigned to the tender case of that illustrious personage whose name is so like his.

David apparently recovered, however, and reportedly deserted on June 20, 1862.

There is no further Record, and no pension seems to be available.

Thursday, May 21, 2009

Riley R. Kent

Riley R. Kent was born in 1826 in New York.

Riley moved to Michigan probably in the early 1850s.

He was married to Michigan native Eliza Ann Lockwood (1839-1877), and they probably had at least three children: Robert and/or William (b. 1864), Ellen or Helen and/or Tryphena E. (b. 1869) and Leoni and/or Emma (b. 1871).

By 1860 Riley was working as a painter and living with his wife in Lansing’s First Ward; also living with them was one Charles Lockwood (b. 1853).

When war broke out he reportedly joined the “Williams’ Rifles” in Lansing, a local militia company whose members would form the nucleus of Company G. Indeed he stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 35 years old when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. On August 18, 1861, one of Lansing’s local politicians wrote to Michigan Adjutant General John Robertson on behalf of Kent’s wife, who wanted a pass to visit her husband in Washington, DC. It is unknown if she ever went east during 1861.

Although Riley remained with the Regiment, by late November of 1861 he was suffering from what one of his comrades described as some form of “paralysis.” He eventually recovered, however, and by early May of 1862 Riley was one of three men from Company G detailed to serve in the Brigade pioneer corps.

According to Edgar Clark of Company G, Mrs. Kent joined her husband on Tuesday afternoon, September 23, 1862. “They was glad to see each other,” Clark observed. “She said she will never go home until he goes. No one can tell when that will be.”

Riley was reported as a company launderer from October through December of 1862, and it is quite likely that his wife helped him. Edgar Clark wrote home on May 15, 1863, that he only “sees Mrs. Kent once a week when I go after my clothes.”

Riley reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Brandon, Oakland County. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. In March he was serving at Division headquarters, was on detached service in May and was still on detached service, probably with the wagon trains, when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

Riley probably remained detached until he was transferred to Company C on November 1, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia, by Regimental order (although there is no Record of him found in Company C’s descriptive rolls). He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Riley eventually returned to his home in Michigan. By 1870 he was working as a hotel keeper (he owned some $3000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife Eliza and two children (son William and infant daughter Ellen) in Marathon, Lapeer County. By 1880 he was working as a farmer and listed as a widower and living with three children (his son Robert, and his daughters Hellen and Leoni) in Marathon, Lapeer County; also living with them was a housekeeper named Jane Bowles.

He was a widower living in Marathon when he remarried to Canadian native Margaret A. Spears (nee McCoy b. 1843), on September 2, 1880, in Hadley, Lapeer County. (She was from Millville, Michigan.)

Riley was living in Michigan 1881 (?) when he applied for a pension (application no. 414794), but the certificate was never granted.

Riley died on December 22, 1883, in Marathon, Lapeer, Michigan, and is presumably buried there.

In 1883 his widow Margaret A., then living in Columbiaville, Lapeer County, applied for a pension (application no. 301387), but her claim was abandoned probably as a consequence of her remarrying a man named Bryan or Bryon. Two years later Nicholas Wolf of Ortonville, Oakland County, was listed as the guardian for two minor children reportedly to belong to Riley Kent when he applied for a minor child’s pension (application no. 330404), but again that claim, too, was abandoned. In fact the children did not appear to be Riley’s at all. They were two girls Tryphena E. (b. 1869) and Emma (b. 1871).

Wednesday, May 20, 2009

Daniel Kennicutt

Daniel Kennicutt was born in 1838 in Livingston County, New York, probably the son of Daniel R. (1797-1843).

In 1840 there was one Daniel Kennicott living in Leicester, Livingston County. (In 1850 there was a New York-born Daniel Kennicot, b. c. 1839, living with his parents Thomas and Nancy in DeKalb County, Illinois. This was probably the same Dan Kennicott who in the summer of 1860 was a 20-year-old farm laborer born in New York, living with and/or working for one Walker Spears in Shabbona, DeKalb county, Illinois. He would enlist in the Fifty-eighth Illinois in 1863.)

Daniel stood 5’9” with dark eyes and hair and a fair complexion and was a 23-year-old painter possibly living in Muskegon County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. (He is not listed in the 1905 Third Michigan infantry Regimental history, although he is listed in the 1905 Fifth Michigan infantry Regimental history.) He was possibly taken sick or perhaps wounded sometime in the first half of 1862, and was detailed as a provost guard from September of 1862 through October. In any case, he was promoted to Corporal on September 1, 1862. He was reported to be driving an ambulance in November, with the provost guard in December, a guard at Brigade headquarters from January of 1863 through July, and a provost guard at Brigade from October 5 until December 24, 1863, when he reenlisted as a Corporal at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Bowne, Kent County and was promoted to Sergeant the same day. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Daniel had been promoted to Sergeant by February and was in fact acting Commissary Sergeant for the Regiment. He was slightly wounded in the leg in on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and may have returned to duty by the time he was transferred as Sergeant to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Daniel was promoted to Second Lieutenant, commissioned June 10, and replaced Lieutenant Leonard who had also been promoted. On November 2 or 11, 1864, he was promoted to First Lieutenant and transferred to Company B, commissioned September 19, replacing Lieutenant Lyon.

Daniel was also reported as commanding Company E as of October 28 and during the months of November and December, 1864.

On December 3, 1864, Daniel requested a leave of absence for twenty days. He cited the need for him to return home to Michigan and attend to the property of his late brother who had been killed while serving in the army.

(Although unlikely his brother may have been: (1) James C. Kennicut, from Kalamazoo, Michigan, who was 23 years old when he enlisted in August of 1862 in the Fifth Michigan cavalry and who was killed at Berryville, Virginia, in August of 1864. This was probably the same James Kinnicut, b. about 1839 in Michigan, who was living in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo county in 1860, along with his father (?), George, a blacksmith born 1811 in New York, mother Eliza, b. 1813 also in New York and sister Clara, b. 1846 in Michigan. In 1850 James and his sister Clara were living with their parents in Gun Plain, Allegan county, Michigan. (2) Or it may have been Henry S. Kennicot who was 29 years old when he enlisted in the Sixteenth Michigan infantry in March of 1862 from Keelerville, Michigan, and who was killed at Groveton, Virginia on August 29, 1862.)

His request was granted on December 4 and he was absent on leave in Michigan in December. On December 15 he sought an extension of his furlough while in Muskegon, and one Dr. O. D. Brooks of Muskegon testified that he was suffering from inflammatory rheumatism and was unable to travel back to Virginia. His request for an extension was also granted.

Daniel returned to the Regiment by January of 1865, and in February was promoted to Captain of Company K, commissioned as of December 21, 1864, replacing Captain Shook. (Regarding his promotion to Captain in the Fifth Michigan infantry, see list of officers recommended for promotion in Official Record of the War of the Rebellion, series I, vol. 46, pt. 3, p. 861.) Daniel was brevetted a Major of United States Volunteers on April 7, 1865, the War Department citing “gallant and meritorious services terminating with the surrender of the insurgent army under General R. E. Lee.” He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Daniel probably returned to western Michigan and may have resided briefly in Muskegon before moving to Montana where he reportedly died in 1885 of consumption at St. Patrick’s hospital in Missoula, Montana territory.

Unfortunately, all efforts to confirm his death and place of burial have proved fruitless, and no Record of his death or burial seems to exist in Montana, nor is there a pension available. He was possibly related to one Fanny Shepherd (b. 1830) and/or Mrs. Anna Kennicott (b. 1837). See Muskegon Chronicle, June 19, 1885, p.7 col. 2: “Death of Capt. Kennicott.” Anna was quite possibly Anna Witherow, wife of William B. Kennicott, born c. 1826 in New York, who died in 1883 and is buried in Germond cemetery, Allegan county. Anna died in 1926 and was also buried in Germond cemetery.

Tuesday, May 19, 2009

John Kempf

John Kempf was born on June 21, 1839, in Saxony, Germany, the son of Caspar (d. 1858) and Margaretha (Hellrich).

His family came to the United States in 1849, and eventually settled in Michigan. Caspar reportedly died at his home in Muskegon County in 1858. By 1860 John was working in the mills in Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan, and living with his mother who was a housekeeper. He may have also been splitting his time living and working in Bridgton, Newaygo County.

In any case, John was 22 years old and probably residing in Bridgton when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was reported missing in action on July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment on November 15 at Camp Pitcher, near Alexandria, Virginia. By December he was reported on detached service working as a teamster and in fact was employed as a teamster with the Brigade wagon train from January of 1863 through February. Although the circumstances are unknown, by November 20 John was in the hospital at Washington, DC, where he remained through December of 1863, and quite likely through February of 1864.

John eventually returned to duty and was shot in the left forearm on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia. He was “mustered out” on June 27, 1864, at the U.S. general hospital in Detroit, on account of a “gunshot wound of the right forearm seriously implicating the ulna joint, which wound he received while in the line of duty.” His discharge paper also noted that John was “suffering from acute inflammation of the kidneys which has attacked him since he has been wounded. His term of service having expired he is about to be mustered out of the U.S. service” therefore he was not discharged for disability.

After his discharge John returned to Michigan and was hospitalized briefly in Detroit where he John applied for a pension in late June of 1864. But he soon returned to western Michigan, and settled back in Bridgton. It seems likely that John returned to his mother’s home which was at the time apparently located in Muskegon -- although she may have been in Bridgton; in any case, the record is unclear on this.

It is known that John was subsequently treated by Dr. Augustus Maurer of Muskegon, who reported in July of 1864 that John suffered from gangrene around the wounded arm as well as “a kind of general dropsy.” And in fact John died of gangrene at his mother’s home in Muskegon on July 6, 1864. Two other former members of Company H attended him at his death, Joseph Schuler and Gustave Arndt.

In 1864 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 90,409), drawing $8.00 per month in 1867. She eventually moved to Chicago (probably around 1870) to live with a daughter but soon returned to Michigan and by 1873 was residing in Muskegon (or perhaps in Grand Rapids) still drawing $8.00 per month pension. By 1883 she had returned to Muskegon County and was still drawing her pension.

Monday, May 18, 2009

Lee Kelly

Lee Kelly or Kelley was born in 1835 in Gaines, Ontario County, New York, the son of William (1803-1876) and Jane (Perry).

Vermont native William married Jane and they settled in New York. William married his second wife, Hannah Chase (1812-1890) in 1843 in Wyoming County, New York. About that same time the family moved from New York and settled in the Grand Rapids area in 1843, and were among the first settlers in what would be called Gaines Township (named after their former home in New York) in Kent County. By 1850 Lee was attending school with eight of his younger siblings and living on the family farm in Gaines, kent County. By 1860 Lee was working as a farm laborer in Cuba, Gaines Township and living with his family in Gaines.

Lee stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was 30 years old and still living in Gaines when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. According to one of his tentmates, Kelly was wounded slightly, possibly in the left hand, at Fair Oaks, Virginia on May 31, 1862. Charles Wright of Company A wrote home to his sister on July 9, 1862, that “Lee Kelly and I tent together now he is well having got over his wounds.” Some years after the war Lee mentioned having been wounded in the left hand and subsequently hospitalized in Washington, DC, but apparently the wound had healed well and created no disability. Indeed Lee soon rejoined the Regiment and was present for duty through June of 1862, and by December was serving with the ammunition train, probably as a teamster.

On January 13, 1863, he was discharged at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, for “general debility with edema resulting from chronic diarrhea.” According to Dr. James F. Grove, Regimental surgeon, Kelly had suffered “from chronic diarrhea since the first of September last. He is much emaciated [?] and entirely unfit for duty. The prospect of recovering is distant and uncertain.”

Before he left Washington for Michigan, however, Lee applied for a pension on January 16, 1863, claiming to be suffering from consumption and dropsy and his legs were swollen and very stiff, although in later years he denied ever having lung problems. In fact, he claimed later that his major problem had been a hernia he suffered in December of 1862. At the battle of Fredericksburg, on December 13, 1862, he later declared, “he was obliged to carry forty rounds of ammunition and he had his cartridge belt strapped so tightly about him together with the exertion and strain endured produced hernia of both sides. He had been feeling poorly before said battle and after the battle was worse and was sent to hospital of the Regiment and after about four weeks was discharged.” Lee added that “He has never recovered from said hernia [and] has been obliged to wear a truss ever since.”

Lee soon returned to western Michigan and settled briefly in Caledonia, Kent County, eventually resettling in Gaines where he was working as a farm laborer and living in 1870 with a wealthy farmer named Foster Kelly (b. 1810); next door lived the father of George Blain who had also served in the Third Michigan. Lee was still living in Gaines in 1874.

By 1876 he was living in Grand Rapids, but was back in Gaines in 1879 and working for Foster Kelly in 1880, in Gaines in 1881, and 1882, in Hammond, Kent County in 1883 when he was drawing $12.00 per month in 1883 for an injury to his abdomen (pension no. 187,429, dated April of 1881).
He was residing in Grand Rapids in 1885, in Dutton, Kent County in 1888, and in Petoskey, Emmett County in 1889. He was back in Dutton the following year, and probably in 1891 when his pension was increased to $14.00 per month. He was still residing in Dutton in 1894 and 1896.

On July 11, 1906, Lee was admitted as a single man to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 4761). He was a Protestant, a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Grand Rapids (until he was dropped on September 13, 1893). He became a member of the Old Settlers’ Association in January of 1880, was active in the Republican party and never married.

Lee died of senility at the Home at 3:30 p.m. on February 12, 1907, and was buried in the South Gaines cemetery.

Sunday, May 17, 2009

Francis Kelly

Francis Kelly was born in 1834 in Roscrea or Rosecrea, Ireland.

Francis left Ireland sometime before the war broke out, and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was a 25-year-old laborer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted as Eighth Corporal in Company H on May 13, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He was shot in the left hip on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and hospitalized on June 2. By July 26, he was in the Wood Street hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, where he remained until he was discharged for his wounds on August 8, 1862. On April 16, 1890, he was examined by Dr. James Sweeny, a physician in Brooklyn, New York, who wrote in his report to the Pension Bureau, that Kelly was still “suffering from the effects of a gunshot wound in left hip,” and furthermore that the bullet had never never extracted from his leg, producing severe pain along with “atrophy of muscles of thigh and leg with loss of power. ”

It is quite possible that Francis never returned to Michigan.

On his discharge paper he listed his mailing address as Philadelphia, but by the summer of 1863, he was residing in New York City when he married Mary Lanigan nee Ingerton (1840-1906) on August 23, 1863, at the Church of the Assumption in New York City. They had at least three children: Annie (b. 1866), Kathi (b. 1868) and Josephine (b. 1873).

Francis and his wife eventually settled in Brooklyn, New York, where he probably lived the remainder of his life: in 1873 at 338 Third Street, and on Manhattan Avenue in 1880 when he was also working as a grocer and living with his wife and three daughters. He was still living in Brooklyn in 1890 next to one James Kelly, in 1892 at 84 Monitor Street, and in 1898 at 93 Nassau Avenue.

Francis received pension no. 133,309.

He died at his home at 93 Nassau Avenue in Brooklyn on November 17, 1899, and was presumably buried in Brooklyn.

In 1891 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 517425).

Saturday, May 16, 2009

John W. Kellogg

John W. Kellogg was born in 1840, the son of Ann.

There was one Ann Kellogg living in Grand Rapids in 1850.

In any case, John was 21 years old and living in Holland, Ottawa County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

He reportedly took sick of typhoid fever at Fort Lyon, Virginia, about November 25, 1861, and died at 12:40 p.m. on December 1, 1861. Aaron Camp, also of Company I, wrote home to John’s mother to tell her that he was with John when he died.

I take my pen in hand to perform a sad and painful task and yet one which I feel duty bound to perform.

It is in informing you of the death of your son John who died today at 20 minutes to one o’clock of typhoid fever after an illness of about a week. He was delirious most of the time after he was taken [sick]. Once or twice he called me by name but was gone again before I could talk to him any.

John was a good boy and one that was universally liked in the regiment and a great favorite with the company and my intimate friend and bedfellow. But he has gone and left us to mourn his loss although he past [sic] off very easy & quite [sic] with a groan or struggle but more like one going to sleep & what more is it than taking a sleep from all our earthly cares & troubles. But I have written more of a letter than I intended for I suppose. The officers will take [care?] of the affairs but still I could not help writing to you to be sure that you heard of it as soon as possible and inform you that he had the best of care that could be under the circumstances but to no avail; nothing could save him and he has gone home to heaven I hope.

Curiously, the U.S. Quartermaster General’s “Roll of Honor” lists him as having died on March 7, 1864, and buried in Alexandria National Cemetery: section A grave no. 1424. He is in fact buried in Alexandria.

In any case, there is a memorial to him in Pilgrim Home cemetery in Holland.

In 1870 his mother Ann was living in Chicago, Illinois, when she applied for and received a pension (no. 147336).

Friday, May 15, 2009

John A. Kellogg

John A. Kellogg was born on February 26, 1842, in Ohio, the son of Martin (d. 1909) and probably Eliza (b. 1818).

By 1860 Eliza was listed as the head of the household, and working as a tailoress in Fitchville, Huron County, Ohio. John left Ohio sometime before the war broke out, and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’7” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 19-year-old laborer possibly living in Hastings, Barry County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company E on May 13, 1861. He was a Corporal on duty with the regiment in late May of 1863, and was a Corporal when he reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Cascade, Kent County. John was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was wounded by a gunshot in the left arm on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and was subsequently sent to Columbian College hospital in Washington, DC. He was transferred on May 15 to Patterson general hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, with a flesh wound below the shoulder caused by a minie ball. According to his hospital Records of May, 1864 he was not married and he listed his nearest relative as one Elisha or Elvira (?) Kellogg, living in Fitchville, Huron County, Ohio.

John was still absent wounded in the hospital when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was furloughed from the hospital on October 24, 1864, and returned on November 13, returning to duty on November 29, joining the Fifth Michigan. He was promoted to Sergeant on June 1, 1865, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Following the war John returned to Michigan, probably Barry County.

John was married to New York native Jane Amelia Spencer (1849-1936), on January 2, 1866, in Hastings, by Israel Geer, Justice of the Peace, and they had at least five children: Lucy (b. 1867), Lydia (b. 1869), Frederick (b. 1872), Harvey O. (b. 1875) and Rena B. (b. 1881). (Israel had himself served in the Third Michigan during the war.)

By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and two daughters in Baltimore, Barry County. He was residing in Maple Grove, Barry County in 1883. By 1889 he was living in Fishville, Montcalm County, where he probably remained through 1894. He was living in Stanton, Montcalm County in December of 1898 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

John was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Stanton Post No. 37 in Stanton. In 1868 he applied for and received a pension (no. 96,682), drawing $4.00 in 1883 for a wounded left arm and $17 per month by 1908.

John died of apoplexy on January 1, 1909, at his home in Stanton. He was buried in Forest Hill cemetery, Stanton: lot no. 10 (or 2), row 5, grave no. 4, 1st addition.

Two weeks after he died Jane, still living in Michigan, applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 675137). She was living in Stanton, Montcalm County when she died of influenza in 1936.

Thursday, May 14, 2009

Jonathan Kelley

Jonathan Kelley was born in 1840, in Michigan.

Jonathan was 21 years old and possibly living in Barry County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was reported AWOL in August of 1862, but eventually rejoined the Regiment. Jonathan was listed as missing in action on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, but he soon returned to the Regiment. He was wounded in the leg on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and was subsequently hospitalized, probably in Philadelphia, from July of 1863 until he was transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps on January 15, 1864, at Washington, DC.

Jonathan probably returned to Michigan after his discharge and probably settled back in Barry County.

He was probably married to Charlotte Wright (b. 1841), and they had at least two children: Marilla (b. 1871) and Gertrude (b. 1865).

By 1880 he was working as a carpenter and living with his wife and two daughters in Barry, Barry County.

In 1878 he applied for and received a pension (no. 158884).

Jonathan died sometime between 1880 and 1890, when his wife Charlotte was reported living as a widow in Hope, Barry County in 1890. He is reportedly buried in Banfield cemetery, Johnston Township, Barry County.

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

George H. Keeler

George H. Keeler, alias “George Clay” or “George Klay,” was born in 1837 in England.

George left England and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’3” with gray eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 24-year-old blacksmith possibly living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was reported on “extra duty” at the Columbian College hospital in Washington, DC, from August 1 to August 30, 1861, at the rate of 25 cents per day, but by January of 1862 he was present for duty with the Regiment. Sometime in early May he was hospitalized, probably in Alexandria, Virginia, and was possibly transferred to the hospital at Fortress Monroe, Virginia, where he may have been placed aboard a transport.

In any case, by late July he was listed him as among the sick and wounded soldiers in the U.S. general hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, and he remained hospitalized until September 24, 1862, when he was discharged at the convalescent hospital, Fort Ellsworth, Virginia (near Alexandria), for “debility, and uncertainty in the action of the voluntary muscles, consequent upon an attack of inflammation of the brain.”

It is possible that George returned to Michigan after his discharge. He may have been the same George Keeler who enlisted the service in Company I, Seventh Michigan cavalry on January 27, 1863, at Assyria, Barry County for 3 years, crediting Assyria, and was mustered February 19 at Grand Rapids. (The First Battalion of the Seventh Michigan cavalry left Grand Rapids for Washington on February 20, 1863; the balance followed in May.) In any case he was reported “absent in charge of horses in transit from Michigan” during February, and was transferred to Company F on March 17 or 19. By May he was a nurse in a hospital at Fairfax Court House, Virginia. George was reported to have deserted near Hanover, Pennsylvania, on June 29, 1863.

In any case George gave his name as one George H. Klay or Clay when he enlisted in Company B, One hundred thirty-seventh Pennsylvania infantry, on January 26, 1864, and was mustered the same day. He was mustered out on August 3, 1865, at Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. He may have also served in an organization called Ramsey’s Battalion of Pennsylvania Infantry.

It is not known if George ever returned to Michigan.

He was married to Sarah A.

By 1880 he was apparently residing in Pennsylvania when he applied for and received a pension (no. 1129379).

He may have been the same George Keeler, born c. 1836 (place “unknown”), who was a widower living with his niece and nephew, Rebecca and Edward Ashenfelter, on a farm in West Hanover Township, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania, in 1910.

In 1898 Sarah was listed as his widow and residing in Pennsylvania when she applied for a pension (application no. 668966) but the certificate was apparently never granted.

In fact, George reportedly died on December 31, 1917, at the National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio, although he does not appear to be buried there.

Tuesday, May 12, 2009

Patrick Kearney

Patrick Kearney was born on September 13, 1843, in either New York or in Monroe County, Michigan, the son of John and Catharine (Dougherty).

Patrick’s parents immigrated to the United States sometime before 1843, and the family eventually settled in eastern Michigan, probably Monroe County. By 1860 Patrick was an apprentice carpenter working for and/or living with Alonzo L. Horton, a master carpenter in Wyoming, Kent County.

Patrick stood 6’0” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 19 years old when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was reported absent sick from August of 1862 until he was discharged for hypertrophy of the heart on November 17, 1862, at Fort McHenry, Maryland.

After his discharge from the army Patrick returned to western Michigan and reentered the service in Company E, Tenth Michigan cavalry on March 10, 1865, for 1 year at Grand Rapids, crediting Wyoming, Kent County, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on June 28 at Lenoir, Tennessee, and served in the Quartermaster department until he was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865, at Memphis, Tennessee.

After the war Patrick returned to Grand Rapids.

He married Irish-born Margaret Cantwell (1843-1925), on January 18, 1869, at St. Andrews church in Grand Rapids, and had at least four children: William H. (b. 1869) and Catharine A. (b. 1876).

By 1870 he was working in a sawmill and living with his wife and son in Wyoming, Kent County. For some years he worked as a mason. He probably lived in the Grand Rapids area the remainder of his life. By 1880 Patrick was working as a policeman and living in Grand Rapids’ First Ward. In fact, he was employed in a number of public capacities for the city: he worked as a Grand Rapids city policeman for five years, poundmaster for two years, and in 1887 he was appointed local agent for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. According to Charles Fluhrer, president of the local humane society in 1887, “Mr. Patrick Kearney has been duly appointed agent of the S.P.C.A. and is clothed with the authority of a Deputy Sheriff. He is a man of large experience and great discretion, and it is with complete confidence that we recommend him to all who are interested in the welfare of the brute operation.”

Patrick was residing in Grand Rapids December of 1879 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association; he was probably also a member of the Tenth Michigan Cavalry Association and he served as Quartermaster of Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Grand Rapids (his wife was a member of the Custer post Women’s Relief Corps).
He was probably still living in Grand Rapids in 1880 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 242824).

He was living in Grand Rapids in 1885, boarding at the Commercial Hotel and working as a hostler in 1889 and in 1890 when he was a constable and living at 30 Miller Street, and attended the Tenth cavalry annual reunion in October of that year.

Patrick died of consumption on Wednesday afternoon, January 28, 1891, at his home, 30 Miller Street in Grand Rapids. The funeral was held on Friday, the 30th, at St. Andrew’s church in Grand Rapids, and Patrick was buried in St. Andrews cemetery, although there is presently no marker for him or his wife. He was originally buried in old 1, block 30, lot 8 and subsequently transferred to new 2, block 25 lot 3.

In March of 1891 Margaret applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 317136), drawing $30 per month by 1925. In 1917 she was declared “mentally incompetent” and placed under the guardianship of one Joseph Renihan of Grand Rapids. She remained under his guardianship for the rest of her life. She was residing at 444 Morris Street in Grand Rapids when she died in 1925; she too was buried in St. Andrews. And like her husband, her grave marker has long since vanished.

Monday, May 11, 2009

Hugh Kearney

Hugh Kearney was born in 1838.

Hugh was married to Mary and they had at least one child.

Hugh stood 5’6” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 24-year-old farmer possibly living in Grand Rapids, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company A on August 8, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Grand Rapids, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, and was missing in action on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia. Hugh was possibly wounded at Chancellorsville. In any case, he was badly wounded in the leg in early May of 1864, probably at the Wilderness on May 5 or 6, or perhaps at Spotsylvania on May 12. He was subsequently absent sick, probably hospitalized, and was still absent when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

Apparently he had been sent to Detroit to recover from his wounds and remained absent sick until he allegedly died of his wounds on April 6, 1865 at Detroit, and was reportedly buried in Detroit, possibly in Elmwood cemetery.

However, Hugh was granted a pension (no. 43868?) on April 12, 1865. In fact it appears that Hugh recovered from his wounds and eventually moved out west. By 1890 he was residing in Butte, Silver Bow County, Montana. (He was working in Butte as a millman in 1891-92).

It appears that he may have died around 1898.

In 1898 (?) his widow, then living in Montana, applied for a widow’s pension (no. 683832). In 1904, under the name of Mary Carlson, she applied for a dependent minor child’s pension which was granted (no. 573439).

Sunday, May 10, 2009

Frank Kaulfirsh

Frank or Franz Kaulfirsh, also known as “Franz Kaulfirshbeck,” was born in 1810 in Austria or Germany.

“Frank” left Europe sometime before the war broke out, and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan by the time the war broke out.

He stood 5’6” with gray eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a musician possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted at the age of 51 in the Band on June 10, 1861. He was discharged for “old age” on November 19, 1861, at Fort Lyon, Virginia. According to the Regimental surgeon, Dr. Zenas Bliss, Kaulfirsh was suffering from “the infirmation of years: the exposures of the service have brought upon him erratic rheumatic pains, with loss of appetite, and complete inability to perform duty.”

There is no further record.

Saturday, May 09, 2009

Michael Kane

Michael Kane was born on July 15, 1845, in Frankville, Ontario, Canada, the son of Patrick and Agnes.

Michael’s parents were born in Ireland, and the family immigrated to Canada by the mid-1840s and on to the United States, settling in Lansing, Ingham County, in 1853.

He stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 17-year-old laborer possibly living in Lansing when he enlisted in Company G on August 8, 1862, at either Detroit or Lansing for 3 years, crediting Meridian, Ingham County, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia and was sick in the hospital in November of 1862 through at least the end of the year. In May of 1864 he was reported absent sick or wounded in the hospital, although according to his obituary he was wounded in the left shoulder by a shell fragment during action at Cold Harbor, Virginia -- which would imply he wasn’t wounded until at least June 1. In any case, was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was discharged, probably for disability or illness, on June 3, 1865, near Washington, DC.

After his discharge from the army Michael returned to Michigan. He was married to Harriet Cornelia Joy (1848-1926), on December 3, 1865, in Oakland County, Michigan, and they possibly had at least five children: Franklin E. (1868-1920), John M. (1870-1945), Mary Agnes (1875-1960, Mrs. Orlo Wood), Alexander (1877-1951) and Curtis C. (1883-1904).

By 1880 Michael was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Meridian, Ingham County. He was living in Lansing in June of 1885 and working as a section boss on the Grand Trunk railroad when he was mustered into the Grand Army of the Republic Charles Foster Post No. 42 in Lansing (and was probably living in Lansing as early as 1882); he was quite possibly a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

Michael was a member of Protection Lodge I.O.O.F. No. 321 and Capital Canton No. 2, both presumably in Lansing. He was still residing in Lansing in 1890, but may have resided for a time in Hillsdale County, although it appears that he lived in Lansing for most if not all of his life.

In 1886 he applied for and received a pension (no. 489051).

In any case, Michael of acute uremia died at his home at 512 North Cedar Street in Lansing, at about 11:40 p.m. on June 13, 1910, and the funeral services were held at the Universalist church under the auspices of the Spiritualist church. He was buried in Mt. Hope cemetery in Lansing.

In late June of 1910 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 710035), drawing $30 per month by 1926.

Friday, May 08, 2009

Henry Kampfer - updated 9/1/2012

Henry or Heinrich Kampfer was born in 1831 in Germany.

Henry left Germany sometime before the war broke out, and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in Wisconsin.

He apparently was living in Wisconsin when he enlisted in the Second Battery, Wisconsin Light Artillery on September 15, 1861, and was discharged at Camp Hamilton, Virginia on September 27, 1862.

Henry stood 5’7” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 33-year-old blacksmith possibly living in Muskegon when he reentered the military in Company F on February 3, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day. (He was possibly the same man who had enlisted as "Henry Kampe" in Company C in 1861.)

“Henry” joined the Regiment on February 17 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. In October he was reported on detached service, and from November of 1864 through May of 1865 he was serving with the Quartermaster department. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war he resided in Washington County, Wisconsin and Houghton County, Michigan.

He was married to one Maria Schneider in 1886 in Westbend (?), Wisconsin.

In 1890 (?) he was living in Red Jacket, Houghton County, Michigan and in Calumet, Houghton County in 1897.

He applied for and received a pension (no. 425700) for service in both Michigan and Wisconsin regiments.

According to one source Henry is buried in Houghton County.

Thursday, May 07, 2009

Henry Kampe

Henry or Heinrich Kampe was born in 1827 in Nassau, Germany.

Henry left Germany sometime before the war broke out, and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in western Michigan.

He stood 5’11” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was a 33-year-old laborer living in Muskegon, Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (He chose to enlist not in the Muskegon-dominated Company H, but in the predominantly German Company C, which was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was accidentally shot through the foot by a musketball at Germantown, Virginia, on July 27, 1861, and discharged because of vulnus sclopeticum (wounds), on May 16, 1862, probably at Buttonwood hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

In 1862 Henry applied for and received a pension (no. 12579).

It is possible that after his discharge from the army he returned to Grand Rapids where he was reported to have subsequently died from his wounds sometime in 1864. If he did indeed die in Grand Rapids in 1864, he was possibly interred in what was often referred to as the “Soldiers’ Burial Ground,” now called the Watson Post Grand Army of the Republic lots in Oak Hill cemetery, where more than 40 unknown Civil War soldiers are buried. (Or he may be one of the two unknown Civil War soldiers buried on the west side of the Grand River, traditionally the German immigrant neighborhood, in Greenwood cemetery.)

It is also possible, however, that he was the same man listed as “Henry Kampfer” who reentered the Third Michigan infantry in 1864 (see next bio).

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

Elliott Eugene, George Edwin and Samuel Adolphus Judd

Elliott Eugene Judd was born on September 13, 1841, in South Hadley, Massachusetts, one of twins born to Samuel (1806-1890) and Julia Ann (Swan, d. 1894). (His twin sister was Ellen Eugenia.)

In 1852 Samuel moved the family from South Hadley, where he had lived for some 46 years, to Grand Rapids where he entered into partnership with B. B. Church in the market business. Elliott entered the banking office of Daniel Ball as an office boy and then as teller for four years before joining the business of Benjamin Luce (who would become the sutler of the Third Michigan infantry) as his clerk. In 1864 Elliott returned to Grand Rapids and became a teller for the First National Bank. It appears that he never served in the military, unlike his older brothers George and Samuel.

In 1868 Elliot went into the hardware business with his brother-in-law, establishing the firm of Carpenter, Judd & Co., located at 15 Canal Street.

He was married in 1865 to Hattie G. Clay.

Although he had never served in the Old Third, Elliot nevertheless became quite active in the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association for many years after the war.

George Edwin Judd was born on March 23, 1838, in South Hadley, Massachusetts, the son of Samuel (1806-1890) and Julia Ann (Swain or Swaine, d. 1894).

Samuel and Julia were married on December 1, 1830 and by 1833 were residing in Avon, New York, although shortly afterwards they moved to South Hadley, Massachusetts where they were living by 1834 and indeed where they lived for some years.

In 1852 Samuel moved the family from South Hadley, where he had lived for some 46 years, to Grand Rapids where he entered into partnership with B. B. Church in the market business. After working for a short stint as a drayman for Martin Brothers and then clerking in a general store in Lamont, Ottawa County, George joined his father’s firm in 1855 and succeeded Samuel to the business in 1858 when his father became crier of the U.S. Court. George married Lucinda Beach (1838-1887) on September 23, 1859, in Grand Rapids, and they had at least two children: Julia (b. 1860) and George H (b. 1861).

By the late 1850s George was working as a butcher and in 1859-60 was operating a meat market at the corner of Monroe and Greenwich Streets opposite the National Hotel in Grand Rapids, and living at 55 Fountain, between Division and Bostwick Streets. In 1860 he was still employed as a butcher and living with his wife and child in Grand Rapids, First Ward. In addition to his business obligations George was also a volunteer fireman, and was elected First Assistant Foreman of the Niagara Fire Company No. 2, on November 25, 1858.

When George resigned from the fire company in order to enlist in the Third infantry Regiment then forming at Cantonment Anderson in Grand Rapids, the members of the company passed a series of resolutions praising his past performance and his present patriotism. “At a special meeting,” noted the Grand Rapids Enquirer on July 14, “of Niagara Fire Company No. 2, held at their engine house last evening, the following resignations were handed in and accepted by a vote of the members present, to wit: George E. Judd, Foreman.” There followed a preamble and resolution which was passed unanimously by the fire company. “Whereas, Geo. E. Judd, our late Foreman and for years past one of the most efficient and active members of the company, has volunteered and gone to serve his country in the war for the Union,” it was therefore, “Resolved, That the sincere thanks of the members of Niagara Fire Company No. 2, are [due] to Geo. E. Judd . . . and are hereby tendered them for their meritorious conduct and services in the Fire Department of this city, while members of No. 2; and that the hearts of their late comrades will accompany them in their glorious mission, under the stars and stripes . . . in fighting the fiery elements.”

Besides his volunteer fire work, in 1858 George also served in the Valley City Guard, one of Grand Rapids’ local militia companies, joining his older brother Samuel who was Second Lieutenant of the VCG. George soon became one of the noted marksmen in the company. In the spring of 1859, the VCG, “numbering 25 guns under the command of Captain Byron R. Pierce, and accompanied by the German Brass Band, were out yesterday afternoon on their fourth target excursion. The company marched to a vacant lot near the old slaughter house, when the target was erected at a distance of 12 rods from the line. Major [Stephen] Champlin, Paymaster [Robert] Collins and Captain [John] Fay, were selected as judges. After each member had fired three shots, the judges reported the best string shot to have been made by Color-Sergeant Thomas Greenly, whose average shot measured 7 and 3/16 inches; second best, Geo. Judd.” (Pierce, Champlin, Collins and Greenly would all serve int he Third Michigan.)

On March 19, 1860, George was elected Fourth Corporal of the VCG, and according to one report by the time war broke out George was Second Sergeant of the Valley City Guard. Many former members of the VCG formed the nucleus of Company A, and George was 23 years old when he enlisted as First Sergeant in Company A on May 13, 1861, along with his brother Samuel who was Captain of Company A.

By mid-August an opportunity arose for George to become commissioned. According to George Miller of Company A, by the second of August Company A’s First Lieutenant Fred Schriver had been promoted to Captain of Company B (replacing Captain Baker Borden who had resigned and gone home to Grand Rapids). “So,” wrote Miller on August 11, “that left a chance for promoting our orderly [George Judd, and he] is 2nd Lieutenant now.” In fact, George was commissioned a Second Lieutenant on August 1, 1861, then promoted to First Lieutenant, on October 28, 1861, and by the first of the new year had returned home to Grand Rapids on a furlough.

George soon returned to the Regiment and was wounded in the left arm on May 31, 1862 at Fair Oaks, Virginia, at the same time his brother Samuel, still commanding Company A, was killed. Dan Crotty of Company F, wrote some years after the war that Judd, having lost an arm and a brother at Fair Oaks, “has given his mite to the cause of freedom, and it is hoped that Lieutenant Geo. Judd will survive his great loss.”

(On May 17, 1897, the Grand Rapids Herald published a story recounting a visit to the Fair Oaks battlefield by N. L. Avery, the man who had brought back Samuel Judd’s body to Grand Rapids in 1862. One of the places he visited was the only “building left as a landmark on the battlefield, and its bullet scarred boards left no question of identity. This was a small frame dwelling, badly shattered with bullets and bearing the marks of time and decay. Near this house at the time of Mr. Avery’s first visit stood a small corn house, but it had disappeared. In this corn house, with a shattered arm giving excruciating pain, lay Capt. George E. Judd on the night of the battle of Fair Oaks.”)

Notwithstanding the loss of his arm, George Judd was appointed and commissioned Captain of Company A on June 23, 1862, replacing his dead brother, and subsequently absent with leave on recruiting service in Michigan through December. Interestingly, while at home on furlough George apparently ran for an elected office in late 1862.

According to Charles Wright, writing home on November 13, 1862, he says simply “I am glad [Francis] Kellogg is elected” congressman, and I am “also glad George Judd is defeated.” Wright fails to explain whether he meant he was happy that Judd was not elected because he was not worthy of the post or that he wished him back with the company. Judd was reportedly still at home in Grand Rapids as late as April of 1863, and indeed he remained in Grand Rapids through most, if not all, of 1863 as well.

Being home, however, was no guarantee of safety. The Grand Rapids Eagle reported on Wednesday, June 10, 1863, that Judd, who the paper described “as one of those unfortunates whom ‘unmerciful disaster followed fast and followed faster’,” had “met with a severe accident last evening. The Captain, as is well known, has been in this city ever since the battles of last July before Richmond, in which he was wounded, losing an arm at the shoulder joint. This frightful wound is not yet thoroughly healed; and last evening, while driving out with his wife and child, on the west side of the river, the wagon was upset, throwing him out and breaking one of his legs just above the ankle, beside otherwise bruising him. Luckily his family escaped any serious injury. The Captain is doing well this morning we learn, though this second shock will prove a severe test of his fine constitution, even if the old wound does not become inflamed from sympathy and trouble him again.”

By the end of July the Eagle reported that it was “glad to see Capt. Judd upon our streets again every fine day. The Captain is fast recovering from his hurts, and his broken leg is getting along finely. In about a fortnight, he will be able to walk without a sling or crutch, probably. It will be remembered that the Captain overturned from a buggy, while riding out a few weeks since, and very badly injured.” Although he had still not recovered by August 1, he was able to walk about with the aid of crutches.

Judd was eventually transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps on January 24, 1864, and assigned to the Department of the Northwest to command draft rendezvous and Indian prison at Fort Kearny, in Davenport, Iowa; and by June of 1864 he was commanding two companies in that place. (The inmates were reportedly participants in the 1862 Sioux uprising.)

In early September, he again returned home on furlough, and on September 8, the Eagle reported that Judd, “who is now and has been for some time past in command of the Draft Rendezvous and Government Indian Prison, at Davenport, Iowa, has, with his family, just returned on a short visit to his parents and numerous friends in this city. -- The Captain lost one arm, fighting for the Stars and Stripes, but he has one good arm still left, which it does a loyal men good to shake.” He soon rejoined his command in Iowa and on October 13 he wrote a letter home to his father, dated Camp Kearney, Davenport, which the Eagle, a decidedly Republican newspaper, reprinted for its readers. “Dear Father,” he wrote,

I received two papers from you this day. I see by them, there is a considerable political excitement in Grand Rapid at this time. I think every honest man ought to know how to vote in the coming election. Some may think that, because I was such a supporter of McClellan, I will support him in this campaign. But I tell you I won’t; I would sooner cut off my only arm. What! support a man that will step on such a hellish platform as was gotten up at Chicago? No sir! I would curse you if you would support such a platform, and you know how I love you.

When I accepted a nomination in 1862, on the “Union” platform, I did so honestly. I did it because I would not lend any help to a man I believed to be dishonest. I then said I was satisfied with President Lincoln, and supported him in everything that he was doing. I support him now with all my heart.

My Lieutenant is an old Democrat and a great McClellan man; but he thinks just as I do. We think we should be fools to support a man that is in favor of an armistice with the rebels and men who send resolutions sympathizing with our brave army in the sufferings they have endured since the war broke out in a fruitless attempt to quell the rebellion, they say.

They are traitors, the whole pack of them; and any man who has been in the army and will support them, is a fool, and, I think, a knave. At all events he ought not be thumped on the head. We are all well and would love to go home, but don’t know when we can.

By early November Judd was again home in Grand Rapids and, according to one observer, was “looking and feeling first rate.” He soon returned to Iowa and was reported in command of Company K at Fort Kearny in February of 1865.

Following the end of the war Judd was employed by the newly created “Freedman’s Bureau” from 1866 to 1870, and spent most of his time in Tennessee. On January 10, 1867, the Eagle reported that Judd “is in town, on a visit to his home. He is from Nashville, Tenn., and represents times as dull in that section of the country.” However, while stationed in Nashville, Judd wrote a lengthy report to his father in Grand Rapids, in which he discussed in detail the state of affairs in the south. On July 18, 1868, Judd wrote that

We are having terrible hot weather -- thermometer up to 110. We have had plenty of rain here, but in some portions of the State they have had no rain for six weeks, and the crops are ruined. The sections where they are suffering the most are the worst rebel counties of the State, and, I think, if the people of the north are willing to let them alone, in their great wickedness, God is not.

Night before last the citizens of this city held a big meeting to ratify the nominations of Seymour and Blair.

It was the biggest turnout of the kind I ever saw; there were at least 10,000 people. Their banners bore all sorts of threatening inscriptions against the Yankees and all who love their country. I tell you, if they should get into power in this country, the Union people will have to leave in a hurry. The Ku Klux Klan are constantly riding over the country, whipping and killing the negroes. There is a perfect reign of terror throughout middle Tennessee. It is the intention to frighten the negroes, so they will not vote at the coming elections, and they will succeed unless something is immediately done to protect the Union people. Complaints come to me every day, of outrages committed. Negroes are fleeing to the cities for protection. They have to leave their homes, and families, and the crops they have made up to this time.

I think the Governor will call out the militia; if so, the matter will soon be brought to a head. I believe there will be a fight; for I think the [KKK] have a force large enough, and are well enough organized, to give the militia a hard one; and I believe they intend to do it. I am anxious to know what they intend to do. -- If they mean fight, the sooner they are at it the better.

George eventually returned to Michigan.

He was a Republican and served as a member of the state legislature from the southern district of Kent County in 1868. By 1875 he was operating a grocery business at 32 South Division, where, the Grand Rapids Democrat reported on May 16, 1875, “He keeps no books, but a cash book, and on that principle will surely thrive.”

In 1868 Judd was commissioned a Second Lieutenant in the regular army, and in May of 1870 was promoted to Captain and placed on the retired list. He returned to Grand Rapids where he lived the remainder of his life, and in 1865-66 he was back living at 55 Fountain Street. In 1870 he was living with his wife and son in Grand Rapids’ Third Ward where he worked as a hardware dealer (and owned some$10,000 worth of real estate). It is uncertain what became of their daughter Julia.)

His business interests were varied. On May 11, 1876, the Democrat reported that he “has erected a handsome public building upon his grounds at the west end of Reed's lake. It will be managed during the season by two gentlemen from Cedar Springs who will have a nice lot of row boats and other conveniences for pleasure seekers.” And on May 17 the Eagle reported that Judd “has sold out his entire stock of groceries. He will devote his entire attention to butter, eggs, etc. at wholesale.”

By 1880 George and his wife and son George were living in Grand Rapids Township. In fact, he built a home near Reed’s Lake, and the Democrat reported on January 15, 1880 that it had recently been burglarized, “and some $150 worth of property carried off, including a gold watch and neck chain belonging to Mrs. Judd, some silver spoons and napkin rings, and a few dollars in silver. A coat and some other articles were taken but left in the back yard. In the morning a back window was found open and the front door unlocked.” No arrests were made.

Judd ran for Chief of Police in 1880 but lost to J. L. Moran, and in March of 1883 ran for City Marshal on the Republican ticket, and who was advertised as “Elect the Veteran.” He lost again, but he did serve as member of the Michigan State legislature as a Republican from the Second district, Kent County, from 1889 to 1890, and was a deputy United States Marshal for the western district of Michigan from 1890 to 1894. He was living in Whitneyville, Kent County in 1888, but moved back to Grand Rapids where he was living in the Second Ward by 1890 and 1894 (possibly at 13 Park Street in 1890).

In 1896 he was chairman of the Kent County Republican committee and directed the campaign of that year. He was a member of the Loyal Legion, the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Grand Rapids, and on January 20, 1882 he was elected vice president of the Mendelssohn Club. He gave a sworn statement in the pension application of Lee Kelly, also formerly of Company A.

No pension for George seems to be available.

From 1899 to 1905 George served as commandant of the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (which carried with it the rank of Colonel). On December 3, 1900, the Democrat reported a story that probably typified Judd’s popularity at the Home.

It is evident that, although Mayor Maybury of Detroit was not elected governor, something he said when he addressed the veterans of the Soldiers' Home at North Park impressed them very thoroughly. He told them that, if elected, he would appoint a man for commandant whom they themselves desired. The fact that the result of the election was adverse to the Democrats has not disillusioned the veterans from the idea that they would like a commander of their own choosing and they have begun an active campaign to secure the re-appointment of the present head of the institution, Col. George E. Judd. From all that can be learned, the colonel is immensely popular with those under him and those who would not like to see him continue in his present office are few and far between. So long as it is ordained that the next commander must be a Republican, no other name appears so favorably received as that of the colonel.

The action which the veterans are taking in the matter is in the shape of several petitions, worded alike and addressed to Colonel Bliss of Saginaw, as governor-elect of the State of Michigan. Librarian Gardner, who has charge of the collection of reading matter belonging to the institution, Sergeant Crumback, in charge of the second floor of the main building, and others were instrumental in placing these petitions where they would come to the attention of the old soldiers.

The petitions have been ‘floated’ for about two days and already have practically the entire membership of the home represented in signatures. Democrats as well as Republicans are reported as having signed and the lists are long. Copies of the petition have been left in the offices of each of the sergeants on the three floors of the main building and in the dormitory. On one floor it is reported that every man signed save one, who refused on the ground that he “never signed a petition in his life and never would.”

It appears that, aside from the strong desire to keep Colonel Judd in the Home, a feeling of hostility toward Manager Northwood is entertained by many of the residents who have been in the Home for some time. The cause of this is hostility dates back to three years ago, when, in an address to the veterans in the chapel, Mr. Northwood, it is alleged, told them that ‘beets and rice’ were enough food for them. This, as it is now reported, was said in connection with references to lessening expense of running the Home.

The petitions, when entirely ready, will be sent to Colonel Bliss, probably in Saginaw, as it is expected they will be forwarded before he shall take his oath of office as governor.

Colonel Judd himself has been ailing for the past day or two, but was reported better last night.

As commandant at the Home Judd frequently found himself in a position of having to become a virtual guardian for some of the residents at the Home. On Monday June 20, 1904, the Herald reported that

The frequency with which the probate court is called upon to appoint a guardian for some alleged mentally incompetent inmate of the Soldier's home has in some way been construed by a number as attributable to Colonel Judd's desire to have sole charge of the unfortunate's business affairs.

However, this is not true, as is seen from the following statements made by him relative to the subject.

“There are probably 100 men on the rolls of the Soldier's home today,’ said Colonel Judd yesterday, ‘who are unfit to handle their own affairs and need guardians. As a matter of fact of the 1,000 names on the record only about 30 have had guardians appointed.

“People seem to think I am anxious to act as guardian over these men. The truth of the matter is, that it is the most unpleasant task I have to perform. The board has authorized me to act as guardian merely because it saves the soldier from paying the guardianship fees.

“You have no idea how many people there are watching their chance to bleed these men as soon as they have any money. It is possible for a guardian to take every cent of pension money. The regular fee is 5% of all money received and a guardian may charge for every letter written or other service rendered.

“I am at present acting as guardian for 18. I have recommended the Michigan Trust Company to act in that capacity, and it has accepted in three or four cases.

“When do I think a man needs a guardian? Only when he is so old he is mentally incompetently or an habitual drunkard. We have several who are able-bodied and would be able to earn a good living if they could leave drink alone. As it is, they can not get employment and their friends will not have them around.

“When any member of the home wishes to leave he is entitled to a discharge, but the state law says he shall not be reinstated until three months have passed.

“We have many cases where the men leave the home with their savings and in two or three weeks ask to be taken back again. Relatives beg us to relieve them of the burden of their presence, and County authorities object to looking after them. They are allowed to come back if they will accept a guardian.

“Remove the guardianship from these men, give them discharges and the money coming to them and they would be back in a short time penniless and helpless asking for readmission.”

Indeed, although he was often controversial in his handling of undisciplined and unruly residents, as commandant of the home that Colonel Judd demonstrated

his ability as an organizer and as a disciplinarian was shown to the best advantage. He raised the home to the high standard of excellence it enjoys today, and personally superintended the beautifying of the grounds until they are recognized all over the state as being the finest kept grounds of any state institution. Strict when any infringement of order was concerned, [he] could not witness suffering unmoved, and would give counsel and assistance at all times. Like all strong natures, he hid his emotions under a mask of apparent indifference which strangers might have termed the real thing. When funerals took place at the home, Colonel Judd was rarely able to stand the strain of attending the funeral service. But, from his rooms, the lonely cortege winding up the hillside was in plain view, and a strong man's tears would course down his face as he listened to the long, lonely, last reveille. The high esteem in which Colonel Judd was held by members of the home was shown when, at the conclusion of the longest term ever held by any commandant, the entire membership of the home turned out in dress parade, to present him with embossed testimonials and the gift of an immense arm chair as a token of their appreciation of his services.

In mid-September of 1905 George suffered a stroke and remained in critical condition until he died of apoplexy at 12:00 p.m. on September 28, 1905, at his home at 81 South Prospect. He “was at no time,” wrote the Press on September 28, “more than partially conscious. He did not appear to suffer much, but medical skill, even though aided by his powerful constitution, was not able to relieve the brain of the blood clot and death ensued. Col. Judd began to sink yesterday afternoon and all through the night and early hours of today became gradually weaker until he passed quietly away.”

The funeral service was conducted by Rev. R. W. McLaughlin of Park Congregational church in Grand Rapids and was held at his home at 3:00 p.m. on September 30. He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: K-56.

In its obituary of September 30, the Grand Rapids Press printed the official announcement made to the residents of the Home. “‘Comrades - A brave, true-hearted and noble man and soldier has left us. Col. George E. Judd, for over 6 years commandant of this home, died yesterday. His record as a soldier was without blemish, and he was an honored, useful and upright citizen of Grand Rapids for over 50 years. As commandant of this home he governed with firmness and impartiality, and its members had no warmer friend or one more watchful of their comfort and interest than he. In common with the community where he lived for so many years, we mourn his loss. Out of respect to the memory of your former commandant the post flag of this home will be placed at half-mast and so remain until after his funeral.’”

Samuel Adolphus Judd was born on May 11 or 21, 1834, in South Hadley, Massachusetts, the son of Samuel 1806-1890) and Julia Ann (Swan, d. 1894).

Samuel and Julia were married on December 1, 1830 and by 1833 were residing in Avon, New York, although shortly afterwards they moved to South Hadley, Massachusetts where they were living by 1834 and indeed where they lived for some years.

Sometime around 1852 Samuel (elder) moved his family from South Hadley, where he had lived for 46 years, to Grand Rapids, and joined into partnership with one B. B. Church in the market business. In 1855 he brought his son George into the business, and by 1858 Samuel Sr. had left the firm to become crier for the U.S. Court. In 1859-60 Samuel was living on the north side of Park between Division and Bostwick Streets in Grand Rapids, and in the spring of 1860, Samuel A. entered into a co-partnership with one E. Powers “for the purpose of carrying on the business of the bakery and confectionery business.” Their store was opposite R. E. Butterworth’s block of buildings on Monroe Street.

Samuel A. married South Hadley native Clarissa Louise Smith (1834-1922) October 25, 1854, at the Congregational church in South Hadley, Massachusetts, and they had two children: William Elliott (b. 1855) and Jennie Eugenia (b. 1858).

By 1860 Samuel was operating a flour and feed store and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids, Third Ward. When the war broke out he was also serving as a volunteer fireman having been elected assistant foreman of Hook and Ladder company 1, and Treasurer of the Fireman’s Association.

During the late 1850s, Samuel A. and his brother George E. both became actively involved in the development of the Valley City Guards (VCG), a local militia company organized in Grand Rapids in 1855. Sam Judd was elected Second Lieutenant of the VCG on February 12, 1858, and elected First Lieutenant on April 24, 1859.

According to one observer Samuel was a superb marksman. On May 28, 1859, the VCG, “numbering 25 guns under the command of Captain Byron R. Pierce, and accompanied by the German Brass Band, were out yesterday afternoon on their fourth target excursion. The company marched to a vacant lot near the old slaughter house, when the target was erected at a distance of 12 rods from the line. Major [Stephen] Champlin, Paymaster [Robert] Collins and Captain [John] Fay, were selected as judges. After each member had fired three shots, the judges reported the best string shot to have been made by Color-Sargeant Thomas Greenly, whose average shot measured 7 and 3/16 inches; second best, Geo. Judd. The best single shot, and the only one in the ‘bull's eye’, was made by Samuel Judd.” He was elected as Captain on December 3, 1860, when Captain Byron Pierce resigned.

Samuel was 27 years old when he enlisted as Captain of Company A on May 13, 1861, along with his younger brother George, and indeed the VCG would form the nucleus of Company A. When the Regiment embarked on two boats at Detroit on the evening of June 13, 1861, “Captain Judd,” wrote George Miller of Company A, and Lieutenant Fred Schriver, also of Company A, “were accidentally left but they took the next boat and came after us, they overtook the rear train at Pittsburg, they overhauled our train just before we got to Harrisburg [Pennsylvania]. Our train had stopped for something when the second train came up, Captain Judd and the Lieutenant came up and joined us, as they came walking up they were greeted with 3 heavy cheers from our boys who swore they would not go through Baltimore without Captain Judd.”

While in camp, one of Judd’s responsibilities, according to Charles Wright of Company A, was to hand out the mail to the members of his company, and “When the mail came in to our camp our boys all crowded around captain Sam Judd expecting to get news from their friends. . . .” At some point after the Regiment went into its winter quarters Clara Judd joined her husband. On January 15, 1862, Wright wrote home to his sister that “They live in a log house, close by, that I and the boys built for him.”

Samuel was killed in action on May 31, 1862 at Fair Oaks, Virginia, at the same time that his brother George lost an arm.

The Third Regiment’s chaplain, Rev. Joseph Anderson, wrote an expression of sympathy to the deceased’s family on June 2, 1862. “You will have received ere this reaches you,” Anderson wrote,

the saddening intelligence of the death of your noble son, and the maiming for life, if not the death, of another. There are times when a calamity is so overwhelming as to mock all efforts at consolation, and i really scarcely know how to approach you, under your sad bereavement, so as to be the minister of comfort to you both. But, if to know that Samuel Judd was the idol of not merely his own company, but also of the whole Regiment; if to know that the sympathies of them all are yours -- earnestly and deeply yours; if that remembrance of the fact that the cause for which he poured out his noble life was worthy of such a sacrifice; if bravery, courage and manly daring on that hard fought battle field, in which the Michigan Third crowned themselves with laurels, and decided the fortunes of the day, on one of the hardest fought battle fields of history of our country; and if to know that among the heroes of that day the deeds of your sons will live in the memory of all the witnesses of their bravery -- if all those and even more are any alleviation, or will bring any balm to your wounded spirits, then you have the satisfaction of knowing that all these are true; and that, while these cannot restore him that is gone, nor make him whole who is maimed, yet, certainly the cause and manner of your bereavement should be some alleviation of your grief; and, while it is natural that the parents bosom should heave, and the tear of sorrow fall, yet remember that his life was his country's; and when she demanded it, Samuel Judd nobly and willingly surrendered it. If a heathen poet, therefore, exclaimed: “It is honorable and glorious to die for our country,” how much more should a Christian parent be imbued with a higher feeling.

Some years after the war Dan Crotty of Company F wrote of Judd’s death, “Oh, how many of our comrades we leave behind, fallen in defence of their Nation's flag. The brave and heroic Captain Samuel Judd, of Company A, is no more. He was killed on the skirmish line leading on his men. He sold his life well, however, for when his body was found three large rebels lay by his side, whom he had made bite the dust. The whole Regiment mourn his loss.”

At home in Grand Rapids the news of Judd’s death came as a shock. Rebecca Richmond, daughter of William Richmond, one of Grand Rapids leading citizens, wrote in her diary on June 4, 1862, “We received today very bad news from the Third Regiment which was engaged in the battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia on Saturday and Sunday last. The report is that Captain Samuel Judd is killed and . . . Geo. Judd . . . severely wounded, beside very many subordinate officers and privates of course. Our city is in a state of excitement and mourning and constantly expecting and dreading a confirmation of our worst fears!”

In late June of 1862, N. L. Avery was chosen by several of the leading citizens of Grand Rapids to go out to Fair Oaks soon after the battle and distribute hospital supplies, money etc. to the wounded men of the Old Third; he was also tasked with bringing home the remains of Samuel Judd. On July 2, 1862, Judd’s remains were returned to Grand Rapids and according to one report the turnout for the “return” of the body was most impressive. According to one local report,

The telegraph of Tuesday morning last, announced to our citizens that the earthly remains of this gallant soldier, in charge of N. L. Avery, Esq., would reach this city on the afternoon train from the east. The Masonic Fraternity, fireman, Military, and a large concourse of our citizens repaired to the depot to receive them. Upon the arrival of the cars a procession was formed, the Masonic fraternity taking charge of the corpse, and marched to McConnell's block; the bells of the city tolling, and the band with muffled drums beating, where the body in a metallic coffin, was deposited until Wednesday afternoon, when the last sad rites of burial of consigning ‘dust to dust’ of all that remained to earth of the late S. A. Judd was performed according to the Masonic ritual, Rev. S. S. N. Greely preaching the funeral sermon. The services were attended by the Grand Rapids Greys and other military, the several Fire companies, and an immense concourse of citizens. This sad scene has brought the war home to our very doors. The death of Captain Judd, who was universally respected by our citizens, and who was slain at the battle of Fair Oaks, gloriously fighting under the Stars and Stripes to preserve the inestimable blessings of our Union, has touched many a heart-chord in this community, and made us to feel the sad realities of war. This loss, though most keenly felt by his own family and relatives, is the loss of the whole community -- the Nation. Upon the rough and rugged path of the battle field he was ruthlessly slain by the murderous hands of rebels. He was rudely sent into the presence of Him who ‘ruleth all things well,’ where there are no wars or rumors of war, where all is peace, and love supreme prevades [sic] all, presides over all. And whilst we cherish and treasure up his memory in our heart of hearts, as one who fell valiantly fighting for the right -- the bravest of the brave -- let me earnestly pray for an influx of the Divine love that shall melt the hearts of obstinate rebels and again unite us in fraternal bonds of mutual sympathy and kindness, that we may again enjoy the blessings of a united, happy and prosperous people.”

Samuel was interred in Fulton cemetery: block 7 lot 5.

Samuel had indeed been popular with many of the men of Company A, and quite a few of his former comrades subscribed to a fund to place substantial memorial built over his remains in Fulton cemetery, Grand Rapids. The Grand Rapids Eagle wrote on June 13, 1863 that

a very appropriate and beautiful monument has just been completed and this day erected in the old City Cemetery, over the remains of our late esteemed fellow citizen, and lamented Captain Samuel A. Judd, who fell in the battle of Fair Oaks, bravely fighting under the Stars and Stripes, for Freedom and the Union. The monument is made of beautiful Italian marble, and is 11 feet high. Its base is made of 2 slabs of Ohio stone; its plinth is a square marble block 2 and a half feet high, with marble caps, on one side of which is chiseled the following inscription: ‘Samuel A. Judd, Captain of Company A, 3d Michigan Infantry volunteers, in the war for the Suppression of the Rebellion, killed in the Battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia, May 31, 1862, aged 28 years, 10 days’; and on the other side: ‘This monument was erected by members of his company, who loved him as a brother, obeyed with alacrity his commands, and will during life, cherish the remembrance of his courage and patriotism.’ The spire is a pillar of plain white marble, square and tapering in form, 6 and a half feet in height, and upon which is chiseled a sabre, and upon the other a double triangle, square and compass. The monument is the work of Wm. Laraway & company, and it speaks for itself in praise of the good taste and skill displayed on it, by this accomplished artist.

And Charles Wright wrote home to his sister on August 9, 1863, “I am glad to hear that Cap. Judd has got a beautiful monument, and I expect to see it some day.”

In August of 1869 the Grand Army of the Republic Samuel Judd Post No. 49 in Grand Rapids was named in his honor. On August 5, “At a meeting . . . of the [G.A.R.], recently organized in this city, it was decided that the Post should hereafter be known and organized as ‘Judd Post No. 49, Department of Michigan.’ The name was chosen in honor of Captain Samuel A. Judd, of the Third Michigan Infantry, who went from this city at the commencement of the war and was killed at Fair Oaks, Virginia, while gallantly leading his command. He left many friends here by whom his virtues and his manly character will never be forgotten, and this society of veteran soldiers did well when they made choice of so honorable a name for their Post.”

In August of 1862 Clarissa applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 415).

In 1868 she married John Kellogg of Massachusetts and subsequently reported herself as guardian when she applied for and was granted a pension on behalf of her children (no. 125349).

Following the death of her second husband in 1887, Clarissa, who was living in Holyoke, Hampden County, Massachusetts, applied for a renewal of her former widow’s pension in 1901 which was granted, drawing $20 per month, and $30 per month by 1922. By 1922 she was living at 102 Elm Street in Holyoke, Massachusetts.