Tuesday, June 30, 2009

Almon F. Lamb

Almon F. Lamb was born in 1843 in New York, the son of Almon P. (b. 1813) and Delana (b. 1823).

Almon P. was born in Massachusetts and married New York native Delana. The family eventually left New York and moved to Michigan sometime between 1843 and 1845, and by 1850 Almon was attending school with his older sister Olive and living with his family in Lyons, Ionia County where his father was a farmer. In 1860 Almon (elder) was working as a shoemaker and living with and/or working for George Craug, a drayman in Lyons.

Almon (younger) stood 5’8” with gray eyes, black hair and a dark complexion and was 16 years old and probably working as a farmer in Lyons, when he enlisted with his parent’s consent in Company E on May 13, 1861. In mid-June of 1862 he was reported sick in a hospital in Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, suffering from debility, and he remained absent sick in the hospital until he was discharged for organic heart disease on March 23, 1863, at Camp Banks near Alexandria, Virginia.

Almon returned to Michigan where he was probably living in November of 1863 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 928613)

He listed his age as 22 when he reentered the service on February 13, 1865, at Danby, Ionia County, in Company I, Seventh Michigan cavalry and was mustered on February 15. He was mustered out on December 15, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

In any case, Almon eventually returned to Ionia County, and by 1867 was living in Portland when he married 16-year-old New York native Mary Fife (b. 1851) on April 23, 1867, in Lowell, Kent County.

By 1870 Almon was working as a farmer and living with his wife in St. Johns, Bingham Township, Clinton County; also living with them was Almon’s younger brother Lyman and his family. It is possible that he eventually settled in Ohio.

In any case, he was married a second time to one Roseta.

His father, a widower was apparently living in Auburn, Geauga County, Ohio in 1880, along with his older sister Aseneth.

In 1863 Almon applied for and received a pension (no. 928613).

Almon probably died in early 1899, possibly in Ohio.

In April of 1899 his widow Roseta was living in Ohio when she applied for and received a pension (no. 486929)

Monday, June 29, 2009

Martin Lake

Martin Lake was born on September 8, 1845, in Oakland County, Michigan, the son of Crapo (b. 1812) and Amanda (b. 1827).

Martin’s parents were both New York natives but by 1845 had settled in Michigan, probably Oakland County. By 1850 Martin was living with his family on a farm in Waterford, Oakland County, and in 1860 Martin was living with his family on a large farm and attending school with two of his younger siblings in Rose, Oakland County.

In any case, Martin stood 5’6” with black eyes, light brown hair and a florid complexion and was 18 years old and working as a farmer in Rose, Oakland County when he enlisted in Company D on February 17, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Rose, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 6 at Camp Bullock, Virginia and was wounded in the side, arm and leg in early May during the Wilderness and Spotsylvania engagements.

Martin was subsequently absent wounded in the hospital when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent wounded until he was discharged for his wounds on either November 23 or December 5, 1864, at Washington, DC.

Martin returned to Michigan, and on December 1, 1864, he applied for and received a pension (no. 47329).

He may have been married to a woman by the name of Julia.

Martin was probably living in Oakland County when he died on October 3, 1866, and was buried in Lakeside cemetery in Holly, Oakland County.

His parents were still living on a farm in Holly, Rose Township, Oakland County in 1870.

Sunday, June 28, 2009

Francis “Frank” A. Lackey

Francis “Frank” A. Lackey, alias “Martin A. Ripple,” was born on September 15, 1840, in Oakland County, Michigan, the son of Abram (1796-1866) and Sophia (Blanchard, 1799-1889).

Massachusetts natives Abram (or Abraham) and Sophia were married in 1819, in Chatham, Argenteuil County, Quebec and were still living in Canada by 1834 when their son Henry was born. By 1840 they had left Canada and moved to Oakland County, Michigan, and by 1850 the family was living in Farmington, Oakland County where Abram worked a farm and Frank attended school with his older brother Henry. Abram eventually settled his family in Clinton County and by 1860 Francis was attending school and working as a farm laborer and living with his parents in Riley. (Nearby lived John Blanchard who would enlist in Company G in 1861.)

Frank stood 5’6” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 20 years old and living in Riley, Clinton County when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company G on May 10, 1861. He was present with his company through April 30, 1862, and on May 20 was hospitalized, for reason(s) unknown. By late June he was a patient in the general hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, where he remained through August, and was alleged to have deserted on September 21, 1862 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was subsequently dropped from the company rolls under General Order No. 92 (War Department), for being AWOL.

It is not known what became of Frank from August of 1862 until October of 1864, but apparently he enlisted under the name of Martin A. Ripple in Company I, Third New Jersey cavalry in Morristown, New Jersey on October 25, 1864, to serve 1 year. He deserted from that unit on November 17, 1864, at Pleasant Valley, Maryland (near Bolivar Heights), and was arrested near Gettysburg, Pennsylvania on November 24. On January 31, 1865, he was court martialed for desertion at Alexandria, Virginia, found guilty and sentenced to be returned to the Third New Jersey and to forfeit all pay and allowances due him and to forfeit $10.00 per month for six months. He was mustered out of service with his company on August 1, 1865.

(Curiously there was a Martin Ripple who served in a Wisconsin regiment during the war, returned home, was married to Harriet who was born in Wisconsin, and who died in Wisconsin.)

After the war Frank returned to Michigan where he lived the rest of his life.

He married New York native Harriet Everetta Seaman (b. 1849) on August 6, 1868, at Dewitt, Clinton County, and they had at least four children: Franklin Eugene (b. 1869), Fanny J. (b. 1870), James William (b. 1872) and Clara Bell (b. 1877).

By 1870 Frank was working as a farmer and living in Sciota, Shiawassee County, with his wife and two children; also living with them was his mother Sophia. By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Broomfield, Isabella County. He lived variously in Shiawassee County, Mecosta County, in Wise, Isabella County in 1894 and 1899 and finally in Midland County, and was living in Coleman, Midland County in 1902, 1912 and in 1914. He worked most of his life as a farmer.

In 1887 Frank applied for a pension in 1887 (no. 600,694) but was informed by deputy Pension Commissioner E. C. Tieman in December of 1914 that his application had been rejected on that grounds that “you deserted from your first contract of service and reenlisted under another name and upon such enlistment received bounty other than from the United States in excess of that to which you would have been entitled had you faithfully performed your first contract of service.”

Frank died on April 27, 1916, in Coleman, and was presumably buried there.

In 1920 his widow was still living in Coleman when she applied for a pension (application no. 1152267), but the certificate was never granted.

Saturday, June 27, 2009

John J. Lacey

John J. Lacey was born in 1832 in Cayuga County, New York, the son of Nancy.

John was married to New York native Catharine or “Kate” (1831-1890), and they had at least five children: Mary (b. 1855), Frank (b. 1857), Cora (b. 1860), Rosa (b. 1867) and Katie (b. 1869).

John left New York and moved westward, and eventually he and his wife settled in Illinois by 1855. By 1857 they had moved to Michigan, and in 1860 John was working as a day laborer and blacksmith living with his wife and their children in Algoma, Kent County.

He stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 29 years old and possibly living in Montcalm County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to Hezekiah Lacey who enlisted in Company G, but who was also born in Cayuga County, New York.) John was discharged on July 30, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia, for “tic dalereaux” (a nervous disorder).

It is possible that John reentered the military in Company K, Second Wisconsin cavalry.

In any case, John eventually returned to Kent County and by 1870 he was working as a blacksmith and living with his family in Cannon, Kent County. He was still working as a blacksmith and living with his family in Cannon in 1880. John also worked as a well-digger, and by 1889 he was possibly boarding at 44 Queen Street in Grand Rapids.

John died from accidental suffocation on Friday morning, June 21, 1889, in Plainfield, Kent County. On Friday morning, at about 8:30, Lacey

was digging a well on the farm of Mr. Armistead, which is about a mile and a half north of the [Michigan Soldiers’ Home] on the Plainfield gravel road. He was employed by a stock company of the name of [W. H. H.] Davis & company, who take contracts of digging wells, etc., and do the work by what is called a patent process. The only thing new about their system is the method of curbing. Instead of the old way of building wooden curbing inside the well to keep the earth from falling in, a new device has been substituted. This is of several sheet iron frames or hoops, made so that they can be fitted to the inside of a well. They are usually placed about two feet apart, but there is nothing between them or to prevent the earth caving in between the hoops.

A man named Frank Ford was helping Lacey and the well had been dug to a depth of about 20 feet. Lacey was digging at the bottom of the pit and passing the earth up in a bucket, by means of a rope to Ford, who was at the top. About 8:30 a bucket was passed up and Ford had just turned away to empty it when he heard a yell, and turned just in time to see the earth moving into the hole from the sides. It had become started in such a manner between the hoops and, once started, took everything with it into the hole, hoops and all. In an instant the hole was filled and Ford saw his companion buried alive before his eyes. He at once gave the alarm and several passers by hurried to the spot. More spades were procured and many willing hands joined in the work of rescue. But it was a long and tedious job. The men worked with speed and energy, and as fast as one was tired out another would take his place. A number of old soldiers from the home learned of the affair and hastening to the spot joined in the work. The soil is a light sand and the workers were compelled to dig a hole about 30 feet in diameter to avoid another cave in, having no time to stop to erect curbing. After three and one half hours work the body was reached and life was extinct. The man was found standing in an upright position with his hand grasping the rope high over his head, as if he had made one last effort to escape before the mass of earth struck him.
Coroner Locher was summoned, but he decided it was unnecessary to empanel a jury, and after viewing the remains and examining the witnesses, decided that death was caused by accidental caving in of the earth around the well.


Lacey’s remains were taken to Rockford, Kent County for the funeral service, and he was buried in Cannonsburg cemetery.

It is probable that his widow Catharine was the same Catharine Lacey who applied for a widow’s pension on August 8, 1890 (application no. 472633), but it is not known if the certificate was ever granted. She may have been living in Morley, Mecosta County in 1890.

Friday, June 26, 2009

Hezekiah F. Lacey

Hezekiah F. Lacey was born in 1827 in Rochester, Cayuga County, New York.

Hezekiah married New York native Mary L. Barnes, on May 1, 1856, in Senate, New York, and they had at least two children: Charles (b. 1854) and Clara (b. 1857). Hezekiah and his family left New York sometime after 1857 and eventually settled in western Michigan by the time the war broke out.

He stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 34-year-old farmer possibly living in Solon, Kent County when he enlisted in Company G on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to John Lacey who enlisted in Company F; and who was also born in Cayuga County, New York.)

According to a member of Company G, during the night of July 18, 1861, following the Regiment’s participation in the engagement at Blackburn’s Ford near Bull Run, Virginia, Hezekiah fell out exhausted after the day’s action. Soon afterwards, he was discharged on September 17, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia, for deafness previous to enlistment. He also claimed after the war that “he was accidentally wounded in the forehead near the temple by falling on his bayonet.”

After his discharge from the army Hezekiah returned to Michigan and in July of 1862 he was possibly living in Grand Rapids, Kent County, when he applied for and received a pension (no. 521693).

In any case, he may also have returned to Solon where he reentered the service in Company F, Sixth Michigan cavalry on September 19, 1862, for 3 years, crediting Solon, and was mustered on October 13 at Grand Rapids where the regiment was being organized. The Sixth remained on duty at Grand Rapids until December 10 when it left for Washington where it participated in the defenses of the capital until June of 1863. The Sixth occupied Gettysburg, Pennsylvania briefly on June 28 and while it was engaged at Hanover, Pennsylvania on June 30 and participated in the Battle of Gettysburg from July 1-3 as well as in the pursuit of Lee’s forces back into Virginia. Hezekiah allegedly deserted on September 3, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. There is no further record.

In fact, Hezekiah apparently enlisted in Battery M, Sixteenth New York Artillery on December 26, 1863, at Sennett, New York for 3 years, crediting Sennett, and was mustered on January 26, 1864, at Auburn, New York. He was on “daily duty” at Fort Magruder in May and June of 1863 and was absent as a hospital attendant in August. He was mustered out with his company on August 15, 1865 at Washington, DC.

Hezekiah eventually returned to western Michigan and by 1870 had settled back in Solon where he was living with his wife working as a painter and his son Charles was employed as a bookkeeper. He was living in Nirvana, Lake County in 1875. Hezekiah eventually settled for in Montcalm County, and by 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Day, Montcalm County, and was living in Westville in 1888 and in McBride in 1890.

Hezekiah died on December 26, 1896, probably at his home in McBride and was buried in McBride cemetery.

His widow was residing in Ohio in April of 1898 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 494291).

Thursday, June 25, 2009

Herman Kusig - updated 4/25/10

Herman Kusig was born on November 30, 1833, in Prussia.

Herman came to America in 1856, and in 1858 purchased 20 acres of land in Muskegon County, and an additional 40 acres the following year. By 1860 he was a shingle-maker working for and/or living with the Asa Sipps family in Ravenna, Muskegon County.

He stood 5’8” with gray eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 28 years old and probably still living in Ravenna when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was shot in the left shoulder on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and was hospitalized as of October 6 in Union Hotel hospital in Georgetown, DC. He was soon transferred to the hospital at Fort McHenry, Maryland where he remained through February of 1863. He eventually returned to the Regiment and was reported as a Corporal when he was taken prisoner on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville.

Herman returned to the Regiment in October, was absent on furlough from October 23 but had returned to the Regiment when he was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, probably in Michigan, in January of 1864.

It appears that at one point while home on furlough he married Scottish-born Agnes or Ann Rose (1848-1881), and they had at least six children: Myrtle (b. 1867), Carrie B. (b. 1868), Risa C. (b. 1871), Jennie (b. 1875, Margaret (b. 1878) and Gracie F. (1880). (Agnes was quite possibly a sister of the wife of John Eadie also of Company K.)

Herman probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was reported absent sick in February but had rejoined the Regiment before the spring campaign of 1864.

Herman was shot in the right side on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and on May 11 was sent to Queen Street hospital in Alexandria, Virginia. On June 7 he was transferred to Haddington hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Herman was still absent in the hospital when he was transferred as a Sergeant to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and on either December 20, 1864, or March 13, 1865, he was transferred to the Forty-sixth company, Second Regiment Veterans’ Reserve Corps at Mower hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He was discharged from Mower hospital on June 17, 1865.

Following his discharge from the army, Herman returned to Ravenna where he farmed for the rest of his life. In 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife Agnes in Ravenna and still farming and living with his wife and children in Ravenna in 1880. He was living in Ravenna in 1890.

Herman married his second wife, a housekeeper by the name of Mrs. Elizabeth Peffers Holmes (1843-1923), at the Children of Zion church in Grand Rapids, on April 11, 1888.

He received pension no. 76,598, drawing $40.00 per month by 1883 for a gunshot wound to the left shoulder. Herman was reportedly very active in local school affairs, and was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. He was still living in Ravenna in 1894.

Herman died of paralysis of the heart in Ravenna on October 7, 1897, and was buried in Ravenna cemetery: section B, grave no. 6.

In late October Elizabeth was living in Michigan when she applied for a pension (no. 664675), but the certificate was apparently never granted. She was working as a farmer and still living in Ravenna in 1900 (she had a daughter named Maggie Quackenbush living with her as well as two farm laborers).

Wednesday, June 24, 2009

Ralph or Roelof Kuiyers

Ralph or Roelof Kuiyers was born in 1846 in the Netherlands.

“Ralph” immigrated to America sometime before the war broke out and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’4” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer probably living in Zeeland, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company F on March 25, 1864 at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Zeeland, and was mustered the same day. (He was probably related to Jacob Kuiyers who was also from the Zeeland area.)

“Ralph” joined the Regiment on April 2 at Brandy Station, Virginia, and was killed in action on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia. He was presumably buried among the unknown soldiers at the Wilderness.

Tuesday, June 23, 2009

Jacob Kuiyers

Jacob Kuiyers was born in 1835.

Jacob was 26 years old and probably living in Holland or Zeeland, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was transferred to Company C (the "German immigrant" company) on June 11, 1861, two days before the Regiment left Grand Rapids for Washington, DC. (He was possibly related to Ralph or Roelof Kuiyers.) Jacob reenlisted on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids, was presumably returned to Michigan on veterans’ furlough in January of 1864, and returned to the Regiment by late January or the first of February.

He was killed in action on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, and presumably buried among the unknown soldiers at Spotsylvania.

Monday, June 22, 2009

Conrad Kritzer

Conrad Kritzer or Kreutzer was born on January 26, 1840, in Hesse-Darmstadt, Germany, the son of Henry and Elizabeth (Moll).

Conrad came to the United States in 1855, quite possibly by himself, and worked for a while on a farm in Lisbon, Chester Township, Ottawa County. In 1857 he went to Illinois where he remained only a few months before returning to Michigan. In any case, by 1860 he apparently worked for and lived with the family of Anton Cline in Chester.

Conrad stood 5’5” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 21 years old and probably working as a farm laborer in Chester when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was taken prisoner on July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and in early July was reported sick in a rebel hospital along the York River. He was soon released on parole, and on the afternoon of July 11 arrived at Old Point, Virginia, near Fortress Monroe, on the John Tucker. Conrad returned to the Regiment December 20 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and was wounded slightly “in the body” on May 3, 1863, by a fall from some breastworks at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and was hospitalized in June and July of 1863. He was transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps on July 3, 1863, where he remained until April of 1864.

Conrad was eventually discharged from the VRC and by 1865 had settled on 80 acres of land, presumably in Newaygo County. He soon moved to Grant, Newaygo County, and then on to Ashland, Newaygo County where he was living when he married Hesse-Darmstadt native Elizabeth Schafer (1846-1909) on June 4, 1868, at the Lutheran German church in Grand Rapids. They had at least six children: John (b. 1870), Charles H. (b. 1873), Henry S. (b. 1875), Mary Elizabeth (b. 1878) and “Maggie” (1879-1887).

By 1870 Conrad was working as a farmer (how owned some $1000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and daughter Matilda in Ashland. By 1880 Conrad was working as a farmer and living in Ashland with his wife and children. Indeed, Conrad probably lived in Ashland the rest of his life. He was living in Ashland in 1890.

He became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in September of 1885, and both he and his wife were members of P of H. Lodge No. 545 in Ashland. Conrad himself was a member of Lodge No. 331 I.O.O.F. at Ashland; he was also a Republican.

In 1880 he applied for and received a pension (no. 231179).

Conrad died a widower in Grant, Newaygo County, on March 22, 1916, and was buried in Ashland cemetery: section A, grave no. 64

Sunday, June 21, 2009

George Korten

George Korten was born in 1846 in Prussia.

George left Prussia and immigrated to the United States, eventually settling in Michigan by 1864.

He stood 5’10” with black eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was an 18-year-old blacksmith possibly living in Ada, Kent County when he enlisted in Unassigned on January 18, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Ada, and was mustered January 19. He was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and reported as absent sick in July. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

George eventually returned to Michigan and eventually settled in Negaunee, Marquette County in the Upper Peninsula, where he worked for many years as a blacksmith.

He was married to Catharine Hazel in Ispheming, Marquette County, and they had at least three children: Archy (b. 1882), Martha A. (b. 1883) and Ida May (b. 1884).

He was still living in Michigan in 1889 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 785422), and by 1900 was drawing $12.00 per month. By 1890 he was living in Negaunee, Marquette County.

George was living in Negaunee’s Fifth Ward when he was admitted as a married man to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 3521) in Grand Rapids, on November 29, 1900, and was still living in the Home in 1901. (Curiously, however, only his three children were listed as nearest relatives.) He apparently knew William Zilky, another member of the Home and a former member of Company C.

George was a Lutheran.

George died in Grand Rapids of suspicious circumstances on December 11, 1903. According to one local newspaper,

George Korten, aged 60 years, a member of the Soldiers’ home, died very suddenly yesterday afternoon at Joseph Weston’s home in the basement of No. 61 South Commerce Street. Coroner Hilliker investigated the case and will hold a post mortem examination this morning.

Weston claims that Korten came to his home yesterday afternoon and complained of being ill. He was known to Weston and the latter allowed him to occupy a bed. Weston says he returned at 5:30 o’clock and found Korten dead.

Korten had been ill for some weeks at the Sailors’ home, but was discharged from the hospital as recovered a few days ago. Authorities at the home say that Wednesday [December 9] Korten drew his pension money amounting to about $38 and took it away with him when he went to the city yesterday. Only 40 cents was found in his possession. As he was not a drinking man, the police believe that he may have been robbed.

Korten has two daughters in Jackson and one son in Marquette, Mich.

Apparently George died of a heart attack. He was buried in the Soldier’s Home cemetery: block 4, row 15, grave 33.

Saturday, June 20, 2009

Anton Kolb

Anton Kolb was born in 1838 in Bavaria, Germany, the son of Leonard (d. 1859) and Henrietta (Sproed, d. 1891).

Adam came to America with his parents in 1849 and they settled in York, Pennsylvania. By 1850 Leonard was working as a laborer and Adam was living with his family in York’s South Ward. Several years later the family left Pennsylvania and by 1855-1856 they had settled in Muskegon County, Michigan. The family soon settled on a farm in Norton, Muskegon County, and by 1860 Adam (listed as “George A.”) was working as a farmer and living with his older brother William and his mother in Norton. In fact, in December of 1860, Adam purchased 150 acres of land in the southern portion of Norton Township (his brother William would buy an additional 139 acres in 1869).

Adam was 23 years old and residing in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

Adam reenlisted as a Corporal on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Ada, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough, possibly in Michigan, in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Adam was killed in action on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and presumably buried among the unknown soldiers at the Wilderness.

In 1864 his mother applied for and received a pension (no. 43186).

Friday, June 19, 2009

Henry Koenigsberg

Henry Koenigsberg was born in 1826 in Mecklenburg, Germany.

Henry immigrated to America sometime before the war broke out and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He was married to Elizabeth Schurr (1832-1907), and they had at least four children: William (b. 1855), Caroline (b. 1857), Henry (b. 1864), Charles (1867-1925).

He and his wife settled in Michigan sometime before 1855. He might have been the same Henry “Coonsburg” living at the Cornelius Van Dusen (?) hotel in Holland, Ottawa County.

He stood 5’10” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 35-year-old farmer living in Holland when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was shot in the right leg and struck by a piece of cannon shell in the left leg and left wounded on the field at Second Bull Run on August 29, 1862. He was soon hospitalized, probably in Carver hospital in Washington, DC, and was reported as a Corporal and absent sick in a general hospital in Washington, DC from September until he was discharged on October 31, 1862, at Carver hospital for chronic, “very obstinate” ulceration of the feet and eczema.

Following his discharge Henry eventually returned to Holland.

By 1870 Henry was operating a saloon in Holland and indeed he lived in Holland for many years, and by 1880 he was working in leather and living with his wife and children in Holland’s Third Ward.

He was residing in Holland in 1883 when he was drawing $4.00 per month for wounded left and right legs (pension no. 218,380, dated September of 1882); by 1910 it had increased to $30.00. Henry was still living in Holland through 1894, and was a member of GAR Van Raalte Post No. 262 in Holland.

Henry was a widower and Protestant when admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 5702) on February 9, 1910.

Henry died of senility and acute dysentery in the Home hospital on February 28, 1911, and his body was sent to Holland for burial. He was interred in Pilgrim Home cemetery, Holland.

Thursday, June 18, 2009

William Koch

William Koch was born on December 2, 1837, in Andelfinger, Württemberg, Germany, the son of Xavier and Johanna (Gersten).

William came to Grand Rapids in 1853 and worked for some time as a rope maker, and according to one source, had been one of the preeminent rope makers in the city before the war. “After the disastrous fire of 1858,” reported the Press in 1905, “which burned a number of factories near the river and destroyed the only bridge across the river at that time, an old wooden structure at Bridge Street, he was employed to make the 2 enormous ropes from which a footbridge was suspended until the old bridge could be rebuilt.”

William married Baden native Regina Theresa Fassnacht (1828-1887), probably in Michigan, and they had at least five children: William (b. 1857), Augustus (b. 1858), Frank (b. 1863), Christiana (b. 1860) and Frank (b. 1864).

In 1859-60 William was still working as a rope-maker on the northwest corner of Straight and California Streets, on the west side of the Grand River. However, with the advent of machine-made ropes, Koch was forced to seek another trade, and consequently turned to upholstery, being the first to set up an upholstery shop in Grand Rapids. He worked at this trade until the war broke out.

In October of 1859 William joined the Grand Rapids Rifles, commanded by Captain Chris. Kusterer. (The GRR or “German Rifles” would serve as the nucleus for Company C of the Third Michigan infantry.)

By 1860 William was working as a rope maker and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids Fifth Ward

William stood 5’5” with blue eyes, red hair and a light complexion and was 33 years old and working as an upholsterer in Grand Rapids when he enlisted as Third Sergeant in Company C on May 13, 1861 (he may have been related to George Koch who was also from Wurttemberg and who also enlisted in Company C), and was discharged for consumption on October 17, 1861, at Fort Lyon, Virginia. In May of 1862 William stated that on July 27, 1861 “he was taken sick with a disease of his lungs . . . at Camp Blair near Washington and was sent to the Union Hotel (Georgetown D.C.) Hospital where he remained about four weeks from thence he was sent to the government hospital at Annapolis, Maryland where he remained about six weeks, from thence he returned to his regiment and remained in the regimental hospital until discharged.”

Following his discharge William returned to Grand Rapids where he resumed the trade of upholsterer, a trade he worked in for several years. In April of 1862 he applied for and received a pension (no. 9962), drawing $12 per month by 1905.

In April of 1863 he ran on the Democratic ticket for Collector in the Fifth Ward but was defeated by Frank Arnold. He tried politics again in 1873 when he was the Democratic nominee for Superintendent of the Poor for the West Side and was billed by the party as a man who would “make a safe and honest officer to disburse the poor fund for the west side. Vote for him and you will elect an honest man to that position, one that will not squander the public money.” But again he lost.

Sometime in the late 1860s William turned to the undertaking business, which he opened at 45 west Bridge Street and he continued in that occupation until shortly before his death in 1905. In 1870 he was also operating a furniture store as well, and living with his family in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward.

By June of 1873 Koch had taken a partner and his business was now called “Koch & Howell, funeral furnishers and coffins,” although by the early 1880s the business was called only Koch Undertaker and Funeral Finisher.” In the summer of 1875 he built a 3-storey brick building on west Bridge Street to be used as a business block, and for nearly 50 years he lived in the same house at the corner of California and Straight Streets on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. It “was the first,” wrote the Press in 1905, “to be built in that locality. At the time it was practically out in the woods only a trail leading to it from the main part of town. Mr. Koch often used to tell about meeting deer and other wild animals in the woods back of the house.” By 1880 William was working as an undertaker and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Eighth Ward. William was living in Grand Rapids in 1884 when he attended the Sixth Annual Reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors, at Battle Creek, Calhoun County. By 1895 William was Living at 45 Bridge Street.

William married his second wife Elizabeth Lavo (b. 1844), on July 2, 1889, at St. Andrews cathedral in Grand Rapids.

He became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in December of 1881, and was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Custer Grand Rapids until he was transferred to Champlin Post No. 29, also in Grand Rapids; he was also a Democrat, a member of the Germania society, the Arbeiter society, the Schwaben society and was actively involved in the German Working Men’s Aid society. William became a regular member of the Old Settlers’ Association in 1880, and was one of the original 33 founding members of St, Mary’s Catholic church.

He was, wrote the Grand Rapids Press, “A man of great will power, outspoken, energetic and of absolute integrity, Mr. Koch will long be remembered by his business associates and friends. . . . Though always avoiding publicity, he did a great deal of charity in a quiet way and was ever ready to come to the assistance of his friends.”

In April of 1905 William apparently suffered a severe attack of pleurisy which plagued him until he died of heart disease on October 19, 1905, at his home at 109 California Street. The funeral service was held at St. Mary’s on Monday, and he was buried in Mt. Calvary cemetery: section 1 lot 67.

In January of 1906 his widow Elizabeth was living at 109 California in Grand Rapids when she applied for and received a pension (no. 656250).

Wednesday, June 17, 2009

George Koch

George Koch was born in 1835 in Wurttemberg, Germany.

George came to Grand Rapids about 1857, and by 1859-60 was a laborer working at G. & C. Christ’s saloon (one of the Christs’ bartenders, William Klump, would also enlist in Company C).

George stood 5’5” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 26 years old and working as a laborer probably in Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861 (he may have been related to William Koch who was also from Wurttemberg and who also enlisted in Company C),

He was absent sick in the hospital at Yorktown, Virginia from April of 1862 until July 7 when he was admitted to the general hospital at Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island, for hemoptyses (spitting of blood). He remained in Portsmouth until discharged for chronic bronchitis on December 1, 1862, and according to his discharge certificate he “had pneumonia in May of 1862, typhoid fever in June [and] has done no duty since May 7, 1862. Atrophy of the muscles both legs, tenderness of spine, haemoptysis and general debility.”

Following his discharge George returned to Grand Rapids where he apparently lived the remainder of his life.

He was married to Prussian- or Württemberg-born Margaret (b. 1839) and they had at least three children: Anna (b. 1857), Mary (b. 1868) and Frank (b. 1869).

In 1867-68 George was probably working as a carpenter for Chris Kusterer, a local brewer, and living on the west side of Siegel between Bridge and First Streets in Grand Rapids, and in 1870 he was working as a carpenter and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward. By 1880 George was working as a carpenter and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Seventh Ward. In 1884 George was living at 39 Jefferson Street; he also worked for some years as a cooper and brewer.

George was a Catholic, a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1884 he applied for and received a pension (no. 304,521).

George died a widower in Grand Rapids on July 25, 1889, of heart disease, and was buried in Mt. Calvary cemetery: section 1 lot 175/173.

Tuesday, June 16, 2009

Hans Knudson

Hans Knudson was born in 1840 in Norway.

Yans immigrated to America in the late 1850s, eventually settling in western Michigan. By 1860 he was a mill worker in Muskegon, Muskegon County working for either A. Trowbridge or Lyman Mason (or possibly for both); working at the Mason mill was William Courser and James Little who would also enlist in Company H.

In any case, Yans was 21 years old and probably residing in Newaygo County when he enlisted in Company H on April 28, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) He died of typhoid fever on January 30, 1862, at Camp Michigan, Virginia, and was presumably buried at or near the camp hospital. He was probably among the unknown soldiers reinterred in the Alexandria vicinity.

No pension seems to be available.

Monday, June 15, 2009

Webster J. Kniffin

Webster J. Kniffin was born in 1836, possibly in Ohio, the son of David F. (b. 1800) and Harriet (Richards, d. 1836).

David and Harriet were married on November 21, 1817, in Pendleton, Niagara County, New York, at the home of Harriet’s family. After Harriet died in March of 1836 David married one Lucy Ann, probably in Ohio, in December of 1840. By about1860 David was working a farm in Willoughby, Lake County, Ohio. Just prior to his enlistment in the Third Michigan Webster was living with his father and helping him to work the family farm in Willoughby. By the time the war broke out Webster had probably just arrived in Kent County from Ohio, joining one or more of his family members who resided there.

He was 25 years old and probably living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company A on June 10, 1861.

In late July of 1861, from Camp Hunter, Virginia, he described the recent events at Bull Run in a letter to his brother and sister. (Excerpts of several letters Webster wrote to his brother and sister in Grand Rapids were reprinted by the Grand Rapids Press during the observance of the Civil War Centennial in the early 1960s.)

“Your letter [Webster wrote] found me almost ready to give up trying to fight to maintain the Union. I was nearly worn out with fatigue. We left the battle ground on Sunday night at 6 o’clock and retreated back to Centreville (Va.), 3 miles from the battle ground. We reformed in a hollow square to charge against horse cavalry. Some had lunches but most of us had nothing to eat. We left Centreville at 11 at night and returned to Arlington Heights (Va.), and got there about 2 the next day . . . hungry and tired out and almost dead. It rained almost all of the way through and we expected we would have a chance to get something to eat . . . and a place to sleep. But to our astonishment we received none of these. We had to stand in the rain until night,’ he continued, ‘and some of us were almost ready to give up. But our noble colonel and captain stuck by us until midnight trying to get us out of the rain. Finally they got us into the camp of some New York boys and got some hot coffee which we relished very well. And then our colonel . . . got us in a shed and a barn which we were very thankful for.”

On August 13, 1861, he wrote to his family the general optimism “‘that this trouble will soon be put down to rise no more.’” But if not,

“We are well fortified for 20 miles up and down the Potomac, and we expect to have a battle here on the river,” he told his brother and sister. Turning to the recent battle, he continued: “You have probably heard the official report from General (Irvin) McDowell concerning the fight at Bull Run. There were 1,670 or so killed and wounded and missing on Sunday’s battle. It is thought that if General (Robert) Patterson had not of been secessionist, we would of gained the day, for he had 25,000 men under him and he had orders to cut off or hold to bay General (Joseph) Johnston with his thousands of fresh troops. But he did not obey orders.” Kniffin continued: “Some of the men, worn out with fatigue, had sat down on the ground to refresh themselves and to eat a little. They happened to look off to the right of them and to their utter astonishment, there were General Johnston with his thousands of fresh men approaching upon them. The men could say with faltering hearts, ‘Where is General Patterson and his 25,000 men?’ But they weren’t there. So much for commencing a battle on Sunday when it is uncalled for. If they had of waited until Monday and sent for General Patterson, that day I believe we might have been in possession of Manassas (Junction, Va.) as well as to be in possession of Richmond.”

Webster was a company cook in September and October of 1862, and by December a Color Guard. He was awarded the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863.

Webster was a Corporal when he was admitted to the regimental hospital near Camp Belle Plain, Virginia, on May 19, 1863, suffering from pneumonia. He died of disease (probably typhoid pneumonia) at 3:15 a.m. on May 31, 1863, in the Regimental hospital at Camp Sickles, Virginia.

Captain Dan Root, commanding Company A, wrote in his diary on June 1, “One of my best men died today, Corp. Kniffin. He was that rare combination – a possessor of religion and a soldier. We buried him in the evening and the simple head board (a fragment of a hard bread box) alone marks the resting place of one of the best and bravest men who have sacrificed themselves for their country. A few months and that will disappear and his comrades will probably be far away. And his lowly bed will disappear from the sight and memory of man. But if there is anything in his religion, it makes no difference.”

Indeed, he may have been buried initially on the Bullard farm, but was eventually reinterred in Fredericksburg National Cemetery: division B, section B, grave 5024 (or 124).

In April of 1870 his father was living in Cleveland, Ohio, when he applied for and received a dependent’s pension (no. 151954).

Sunday, June 14, 2009

Ira C. Knickerbocker

Ira C. Knickerbocker was born around 1821 in Smithfield, Dutchess County, or Smithville, Chenango County, New York, the son of New York natives Alvin (1799-1886) and Lucinda (Kelly, 1803-1858).

Alvin was probably living in New York, in August of 1814 when he enlisted in Captain Eli Robinson’s Company of militia in Col. Van Dalfsen’s Regiment. Following his discharge from the army he settled in Chenango County, New York where he married Lucinda around 1819. They lived in Chenango County for some years before moving to Pennsylvania. In the early 1840s Alvin settled his family in Bradford County, Pennsylvania.

Ira married Margaret Sisson (1830-1892) on October 21, 1849, in Bradford County, Pennsylvania, and they had at least three children: Humphrey (b. 1857), C. E. (b. 1859) and Hattie (b. 1863).

In 1850 Ira and Margaret were living either with Margaret’s family in Barton, Tioga County, Pennsylvania, or with Ira’s family in Athens, Bradford County, Pennsylvania.

Ira left New York sometime before 1864 and came to Michigan.

Ira stood 5’8” with blue eyes, gray hair and a light complexion and was a 44-year-old carpenter possibly living in Courtland, Kent County when he enlisted in Company E on January 19, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Courtland or Dalton, Muskegon County, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on February 10, was on detached service in April and May, and reportedly wounded in early May. He was still on detached service at Brigade headquarters when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was absent sick in the hospital from August of 1864 through May of 1865, and probably until he was discharged on June 7, 1865, from Mower hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After the war Ira eventually returned to Michigan.

By 1870 he was apparently a prisoner in the state prison at Jackson’s Fourth Ward, Jackson County (offense unknown). Following his release he remained in Michigan and by 1888 he was residing in South Allen, Hillsdale County.

Ira died, probably sometime in 1891. In January of 1892 Margaret was living in Indiana when she applied for a widow’s pension (application no. 553439). She reportedly died in Minica, Chickasaw County, Indiana.

Saturday, June 13, 2009

Porter Knapp

Porter Knapp was born probably in April of 1841, in New York, the son of Aaron and Aurelia.

In 1860 there was one Porter Knapp living in Hinsdale, Cattaraugus County, New York. That same year there was also a woman named Aral Knapp, age 40 and born in Massachusetts keeping house as the head of the household and living in Vienna, Genesee County, Michigan; living with her were three of her children all born in New York. (Porter would settle in Vienna after the war.)

Porter stood 5’6” with black eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a 24-year-old laborer when he enlisted in Company H on January 19, 1864, at Grand Rapids, Michigan, for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on February 17 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, was sick in the hospital in March, and wounded slightly in the head in early May.

Porter was probably still absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and reported absent sick from May through July, and on detached service in August and September. He had probably returned to the Fifth Michigan when he was wounded and taken prisoner on October 27 at the Boydton Plank road near Petersburg, Virginia. He was apparently exchanged or released and discharged for disability on June 11, 1865.

Porter returned to Michigan after the war and eventually settled in Vienna, Genesee County, where he may have worked as a clerk. (In 1870 his parents were living in Vienna where Aaron owned a dry goods store.) By 1880 Porter was a widower suffering from rheumatism and living with his parents in Pine Run, Genesee County.

In 1865 he applied for and received a pension (no. 195242) for his service in the Third and Fifth Michigan infantry, as well as service in Company H, Third Michigan cavalry.

He died of liver disease in Vienna on July 20, 1880, and was presumably buried there.

In 1890 his mother was residing in Nebraska when she applied for and received a dependent mother’s pension (no. 346464).

Friday, June 12, 2009

Joseph E. Knapp

Joseph E. Knapp was born in April or May of 1845 in Lucas County, Ohio, the son of Ephraim (b. 1812) and Mary A. (b. 1823).

New York or Canadian native Ephraim married Maine-born Mary and they eventually settled in Ohio. By 1850 Joseph E. was attending school and living with his family in Waterville, Lucas County, Ohio. Joseph’s family left Ohio, possibly in the late 1850s and moved westward eventually settling in western Michigan where by 1860 Joseph was a sawyer living with his family in Green, Oceana County where his father worked as a farmer.

Joseph stood 5’8” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 17 years old and residing in Oceana County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was discharged for consumption on December 20, 1861, at Camp Michigan, Virginia.

After his discharge from the army Joseph returned to western Michigan, probably to Dayton, Newaygo County where he died of disease, probably consumption, on June 18, 1862, and was buried in Dayton cemetery. (See photos G869a-869d. Also listed on the same headstone is one Nancy A., wife of E. Knapp, who died in 1882 at the age of 74.)

No pension seems to be available.

In 1870 his father (who owned some $4000 worth of real estate) was still living in Green, Oceana County.

Thursday, June 11, 2009

William Klump

William Klump, alias “John Baker,” was born in 1837 in Germany.

William immigrated to America and eventually settled in western Michigan. By 1859-60 William was probably working as a bartender at G. & C. Christ’s saloon in Grand Rapids. In any case, he may have been the same William Klump who was married on March 9, 1861, to Margaret Schwartz, by Rev. Francis Cuming (who would become the first chaplain of the Third Michigan infantry) at the Ohio House in Grand Rapids.

William was 26 years old when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He allegedly deserted on September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, when in fact he had been taken prisoner on June 30 or July 1, 1862, near Richmond, Virginia (probably White Oak Swamp).

William returned to the Regiment on December 20 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and was reported AWOL in April of 1863. He apparently returned to the Regiment and was wounded on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, subsequently hospitalized in Washington, DC through June, and by July he was a provost guard. He supposedly deserted on August 30, 1863, at Washington, DC.

There is no further Record.

In fact William survived the war although it is not known if he ever returned to Michigan. By 1891 he was living in Minnesota under the name of “John Baker” and married to Lena Baker.

In 1891 William applied for a pension (no. 1084129) but the certificate was never granted.

William died, probably in December of 1901 or perhaps in early January of 1902, probably in Minnesota and was presumably buried there.

In any case, his widow was living in Minnesota when she applied for a pension (no. 765503), but the certificate was never granted.

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

John Frederick Klink

John Frederick Klink was born on June 4, 1837, in Baltimore, Maryland, the son of Gottlieb (1811-1882).

John’s father was born in Wurtemberg and immigrated to the United States sometime before 1837, eventually settling in Maryland. His family moved from Maryland sometime in the late 1850s and headed westward, eventually settling in western Michigan where by 1860 his father Gottlieb had settled in Alpine, Kent County. That same year John was a farm laborer working for and/or living with the family of Conrad Kritzer, a farmer in Chester, Ottawa County.

John stood 5’5” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 24 years old and still living in Chester, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was employed as a teamster from at least July of 1862 until September 24 when he became ill at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. He was subsequently hospitalized in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania until March 25, 1863, when he was discharged for chronic nephritis at Germantown hospital in Philadelphia.

After his discharge John returned to Alpine, where he was living in 1864 when he married Michigan native Margaret Failing (1846-1923), and they probably had at least six children: Elizabeth (b. 1866), Amelia S. or Sarah A. (1867-1882), George P. (b. 1870), and Fred H. or Henry F. (1871-1940), Rosa C. (b. 1874) and a daughter Christian M. (b. 1866).

By 1874 John or Frederick was living in Grand Rapids, but back in Alpine by 1894. His father was living in Sparta in 1870. By 1880 John was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Alpine, Kent County.

John was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. In 1888 he applied for and received a pension (no. 474731).

He died on November 15,1902, possibly in Alpine or in Chester, Ottawa County and was buried in Lutheran cemetery, Chester; see photos G-370 and G-371.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 587384).

Tuesday, June 09, 2009

John Kling

John Kling was born in 1823 in Prussia.

John immigrated to America, eventually settling in Michigan where by 1860 he was may have been working as a rope-maker in Springfield, Wayne County.

Nevertheless, he was apparently living in eastern Missouri by the time the war broke out. He stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion, and was 39 years old when he first enlisted in Battery K, Second Missouri Heavy Artillery on November 12, 1861, at St. Louis, Missouri for 3 years, and was mustered out on August 24, 1863, at Benton Barracks, St. Louis.

After his discharge John eventually returned to Michigan and by 1864 he was probably living in Muskegon, Muskegon County, when he reentered the service at the age of 41 in Company C, Third Michigan infantry on January 30, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon County. He was mustered the same day and joined the Regiment on February 18 at Camp Bullock, Virginia. He was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war John returned to Michigan and resided in Huron County where he worked for many years as a gardener and a laborer.

He was married to Mary and subsequently to Julia A. (b. 1818).

By 1880 John was working as a farmer and living with his wife Julia and granddaughter Vinia Liney in Zilwaukee, Saginaw County; also living with them were four boarders. By 1885 John was living in Hume, Huron County.

In 1885 he applied for and received a pension (no. 621479).

He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 530) on March 4, 1887, was discharged on July 19, readmitted (date unknown) and discharged for the last time on September 13, 1891.

John died at Port Crescent, Huron County, on October 3, 1892, and was presumably buried there.

His widow Julia A. was residing in Port Crescent, Huron County in 1894 when she applied for a pension (application no. 587380), but the certificate was apparently never granted.

Monday, June 08, 2009

Peter Klein

Peter Klein was born in 1839 in Prussia.

Peter immigrated to America sometime before the war broke out and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 22-year-old farmer probably living in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was reported missing in action on July 27 (probably July 21), 1861, at Bull Run, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment on July 31 at Hunter’s Farm, Virginia. Peter was discharged for consumption on September 16, 1861, at Fort Richardson, Virginia.

In 1863 he applied for a pension (no. 19155) but the certificate was never granted.

It is possible that Peter returned to Michigan where he may have reentered the service as a Private in M company, Eleventh cavalry, on August 30, 1864, at Jackson, Jackson County.

Sunday, June 07, 2009

Jacob G. Klein

Jacob G. Klein was born in1836 in West Hofen (?), Germany.

Jacob immigrated to America sometime before the war broke out, and eventually settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’5” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 25-year-old shoemaker possibly living in Muskegon when the war broke out. He reportedly enlisted on July 8, 1861, for five years, in Company B, Sixteenth U.S. infantry. However, on July 29, 1861, Congress enacted a law that enlistments in the army were to be for three years. In any case, Jacob was charged with deserting from the Sixteenth U.S. Infantry on October 9, 1862.

Nevertheless, Jacob was 28 years old when he enlisted in Company C, Third Michigan infantry, on February 6, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on February 18 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, was absent sick in March and possibly still absent sick when he was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was reported absent sick since June 15 at Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island, and mustered out on June 18, 1865, at Detroit.

It is not known if Jacob returned to Michigan after the war, and in fact Jacob probably settled in Chicago where he resided for many years.

He was married to Betty or Bietje (d. 1888), and they had at least four children: John (b. 1867), Henry (b. 1869), Herman (b. 1873 and Louise (b. 1875). (All of his children were born in Illinois.)

By 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife Bietje and children in Des Plaines, Cook County. By 1882 he was living at 293 Mohawk Street in Chicago when he first applied for and received a pension (no. 251516).

After his first wife died Jacob married Julia Edmunds on December 24, 1888 in the town of Harmony (state unknown), and they had at least one child: Rosetta (b. 1890).

He was still living in Illinois in 1892, but by 1894 and 1895 he was living in Janesville, Rock County, Wisconsin. At one point he lived at 410 S. Jackson Street in Janesville.

Jacob died in October of 1913, in Janesville and was presumably buried there.

Saturday, June 06, 2009

Andrew Kirschman

Andrew Kirschman was born on January 30, 1831 in Frutingen or Württemberg, Germany, the son of Jacob.

Andrew immigrated to America sometime before 1859 and eventually settled in western Michigan. He was probably living in Grand Rapids when he joined the Grand Rapids Rifles, commanded by Captain Chris. Kusterer, on July 19, 1859. (The GRR or “German Rifles” would serve as the nucleus for Company C of the Third Michigan infantry.) By 1859-60 Andrew was working as a shoemaker for Rushe & Betts and boarding on the east side of Canal between Bronson and Bridge Streets in Grand Rapids.

He was 30 years old, working as a shoemaker and living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted as a Corporal in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was detached as Colonel’s orderly in September and October of 1862, and he reenlisted on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Ada, Kent County. He was absent on veteran’s furlough during the month of January 1864.

While home in Grand Rapids on veteran’s furlough for thirty days he married German-born Margaretta Wagner (1845-1932), on January 14, 1864, in a double wedding ceremony with another comrade on furlough from Company C, Theodore Castor. (Margaretta was the sister to Peter Wagner, also of Company C.)

Many years later Castor described how the two weddings came about. Castor and his wife Barbara had been married in a civil service, but were in Grand Rapids in mid-January looking for a church to marry them, as their families thought they should be married in a church. While in the city Castor ran into Kirschman

who told me that he was going to get married and his intended wife was a Catholic and he Lutheran. When I told him my business we concluded to have it come off together. So we started to the Catholic Parish to see the Priest and found that he wasn't in town and they didn't know when he would be, when we went to the Lutheran minister who told us that he was ready any time we were and to just let him know when and where. And when at noon at the dinner table told the rest of company C boys about it, they told us not to make any arrangement except to get a private house and family to get the supper and have room enough to accommodate lots of people. I and Kirschman went over on the west side to see one of Kirschman's friends -- a man by the name of Wurfel who had a big house and he told us that the house was free and to come any time we were ready and that he would get up the supper and wouldn't charge the regular price -- so much per meal and take the boys for pay. We told the boys that we wanted the business to come next day and they russeled around and got everything ready. And we four drove up to Wurfel's house -- everybody was there and the house was as full as it would hold. [On January 14,] The boys had invited all their friends and everybody else. And after the ceremony was over supper was served and we had as fine a supper as anybody could get up.

Andrew and Margaretta had at least 10 and possibly 13 children: Charles or Anthony (b. 1862), Jacob (b. 1866), Louise (b. 1867), Amelia (b. 1870), Margaret (b. 1871), Mrs. Rosa Hawn (b. 1875), George (b. 1876), John (b. 1878), Anna (b. 1880), Albert, Edward, Benjamin and Robert.

Andrew returned to the Regiment, probably on or about the first of February, and was transferred as a Corporal to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was reported on detached service from July through October, and by December he was employed in the Quartermaster department where he remained through at least January of 1865. He was employed at Brigade headquarters from February through May, and was mustered out as a Corporal on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Following the war Andrew returned to Grand Rapids where he lived the rest of his life. He resumed his trade as shoemaker, and in 1867-68 he was working at a shoe shop at 57 Monroe, and living on the southwest corner of Gold and Washington Streets. By 1868-69 he was working as a bootmaker for J. G. Kalmbach & Co., and living on the east side of Gold and New York (?) Streets, and he was living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward working as a shoemaker in 1870. He was working as a shoemaker and living with his wife and children in on Jefferson Street Grand Rapids in 1880.

He was living in Grand Rapids in December of 1879 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association; he was also a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Custer Post No. 5 in Grand Rapids and a Lutheran (his wife was a Catholic).

In 1890 he applied for and received a pension (no. 654766), drawing $20 per month by 1908.

By 1880 Andrew was still working as a shoemaker and his oldest son Antony was employed as a clerk in a shoe shop. In any case he was still living with his wife and children on Jefferson Street in Grand Rapids’ Eighth Ward. Around 1900 he was residing at 317 N. Broadway, and in 1906 and 1907 at 328 W. Broadway.

Andrew died of organic heart disease at his home at 328 West Broadway, Grand Rapids, on Wednesday, February 24, 1909. The funeral service was held at his residence at 2:00 p.m. on Saturday, February 27, and he was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: block 9 lot 67.

In March of 1909 his widow was living at 47 Delaney Street in Grand Rapids, when she applied for and received a pension (no. 679343).

Friday, June 05, 2009

William H. Kirkland

William H. Kirkland was born in 1842.

In 1860 there was one William H. Kirkland, age 14 and born in Michigan, son of William H and Mary, living in Almont, Lapeer County, Michigan

William was 20 years old and possibly living in Jamestown, Ottawa County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company I on April 8, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years and was mustered the same day at Detroit.

William died of disease on June 7 or 8, 1862, at Annapolis, Maryland, and was reportedly buried in the “Citizen’s Graveyard” at Annapolis; he was eventually interred in Annapolis National Cemetery, section N, grave no. 11.

No pension seems to be available.

In 1880 there was a hotel keeper named William Kirkland, reportedly married b. c. 1821 in England living in Grand Haven, Ottawa County.

Thursday, June 04, 2009

Henry E. Kingsbury

Henry E. Kingsbury was born on December 7, 1835, in Cleveland, Ohio, the son of Henry.

Henry E. left Ohio and moved westward, eventually settling in western Michigan where by 1860 he was a medical student living with the family of Dr. Albert Bomtul (?) in Hastings, Barry County; also living with this family was Cody Reed, who would also enlist in Company K on May 13, 1861. And next door lived James Birdsall who would also enlist in the Third Michigan. (He was possibly related to one Sarah Kingsbury, b. 1817 in Massachusetts and working as a teacher in Hastings in 1860.)

Henry stood 5’5” with blue eyes, red hair and a florid complexion and was 25 years old and living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company K. He was injured in the chest on June 15, 1862, and although alleged to have deserted on September 21, 1862, at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, in fact Henry was in the hospital, where he probably served for a time as a nurse. He was discharged on January 22, 1863, at Third Corps hospital near Fort Lyon, Virginia, for “hypertrophy of the heart accompanied by severe cramps of the whole body, entirely unfitting him for duty, caused by exposure on the [Virginia] peninsula & an injury received on the chest on the 15th of June, 1862; has done no duty since.”

It is not known if Henry returned to Michigan after his discharge, although he reportedly reentered the military in Company K, First New York “Lincoln” cavalry on March 11, 1864, and was discharged or mustered out on June 1, 1865. (Company K was apparently made up largely of Michigan men.)

After the war Henry did return to Barry County.

He was married to New York native Sarah H. (d. 1887) and they had at least three children: Eva C. (b. 1872, possibly Mrs. Frank O’Hara), Charles E. (b. 1874) and Angie (b. 1877, possibly Mrs. Claude Noe).

By 1870 Henry was working as a clerk in a store in Hastings village, Barry County, and living with his wife and probably his younger sister Ida. Henry eventually settled in Muskegon in the mid-1870s and was employed for some time as a clerk on the Goodrich steamer Muskegon on the line between Muskegon and Chicago (he apparently did not pursue the medical education), and lived in Muskegon for many years. Indeed, by 1880 he was working as a clerk on a steamship and living in Muskegon’s Third Ward with his wife and children. Henry was living in Muskegon in December of 1881 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, in 1885, in 1887 when he joined Grand Army of the Republic Kearny Post No. 7 in Muskegon, in 1889, and in 1890 at 120 Clay Street.

In 1891 he applied for a pension (application no. 1055544), but the certificate was never granted.

He was Muskegon City Recorder from 1888 to 1891 when he moved to a farm in Norton Township, Muskegon County, where he was living in 1894. By November of 1895 he was living with his daughter Mrs. O’Hara, in Norton.

Henry died a widower of paralysis at 11:00 a.m. on Thursday, September 3, 1896, at Mrs. O’Hara’s home. According to one report, “he had been ill with heart disease for the past three weeks, but had been able to be around most of the time and was coming to this city to see his physician last Saturday. Sunday he had a very severe attack and it was thought he would survive but a short time. He rallied, however, and lingered until yesterday forenoon, when he died of dropsy of the heart.”

Brief funeral services were held at the O’Hara residence at 1:00 p.m. September 5, and he was buried beside his wife in Evergreen cemetery, Muskegon: 4-4-1.

Wednesday, June 03, 2009

Myron H. King

Myron H. King was born in 1846 either in Jackson County, Michigan, or Brooklyn, New York, the son John L. (b. 1813) and Mary Ann (Cole, b. 1815).

Myron’s parents were both New York natives and presumably married in New York sometime before 1833 when their daughter Phebe was born. Sometime between 1842 and 1845 John moved his family to Michigan, eventually settling in Jackson County. By 1850 Myron and his family were residing in Columbia, Jackson County. John eventually settled his family in Kent County and by 1860 Myron was attending school with five of his siblings and living on the family farm in Cascade.

Myron stood 5’10” with dark eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer probably living in Cascade, Kent County when he enlisted in Company E on January 12, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Cascade, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on April 9 at Brandy Station, Virginia, and was reported sick with intermittent fever April 21-23 and suffered from the mumps April 26 to May 1. He returned to duty and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

He was again reported sick July 8-12, 1864, and subsequently sent to City Point hospital on July 12 suffering from diarrhea and transferred on July 15 to Washington, DC, where he was admitted to Armory Square hospital on July 16 with hematemesis (bloody vomiting). He was on furlough from the hospital August 1-31 and returned to duty September 14. He was admitted to the Fifth Corps depot hospital at City Point, Virginia, on February 2, 1865, with inflammation of the iris and chronic diarrhea and returned to duty on May 14. He was transferred to the Provost Marshal at Camp Dennison, Ohio. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Myron eventually returned to western Michigan, probably to the Grand Rapids area.

Myron married his first wife, Michigan native Catherine (1851-1873), presumably in Michigan, and they had at least one child: William (1870-1889). By 1870 Myron was working as a farmer and living with his wife and child in Cascade; nearby lived his father and older brothers Alvin and James on their own farms and with their own families.

After Catharine died in 1873 Myron married Carrie B. (b. 1860), and by 1880 he and Carrie and his son Willie were living in Cascade.

Carrie reportedly left him sometime in the late 1880s for one George Lardie whom she eventually married.

Myron married his third wife, Cora Kelly (b. 1865) on August 28, 1889, and they had at least one child Charles, who was reportedly crippled.

Myron was working as a mason and living at 330 Taylor in Grand Rapids in 1890.

In 1887 he applied for and received a pension (no. 733789).

On Tuesday morning, November 28, 1893, Myron shot and killed his estranged wife and then shot himself.

Myron A. King, aged fifty-five years, an old soldier, yesterday morning shot his wife after a desperate struggle and then finished the tragedy by sending a bullet through his own head. The wife died almost instantly, and the murderer lived five hours without regaining consciousness.

The crime was committed in the home of the Kings, on Dean Street, a little ungraded street in the extreme northern end of the city, and the house stands on a slight hill, a half block west of Plainfield Avenue. The building is a new one and very cheap. The furnishings were poor and everything about the house indicated slovenliness and squalor.

The immediate cause of the tragedy was the tyrannical disposition of the husband. He drove his wife away from home several times by extreme cruelty and at last enticed her back and then brutally murdered her.

King had been married twice before. He served during the war in Company E, Fifth Michigan Infantry but did not belong to the Grand Army [GAR]. He was a stone mason by trade, but the neighbors describe him as a lazy and quarrelsome fellow who would not work and who depended solely upon his pension of $8 a month to care for himself, together with what his wife could earn by hard work. He was married six years ago, his wife, Cora Kelly, being twenty-one years old and himself forty-nine at the time. Their happiness was of brief duration. He treated the young wife more like a slave than a companion. She endured him as long as she could, but finally left him and went out to work, but he induced her to return. This was repeated several times and a few months ago a child was born to them. While the mother was unable to leave her bed it is alleged that he abused her shamefully.

As soon as the long suffering wife was able to walk she left the house and went to work for a family on Ottawa Street. Her parents, Adam Kelly and his wife, live at 13 Island Street and last Saturday she went to them for a brief visit. She said that she would be through with her work for the Ottawa Street family on Monday and must then look for another place. She had been nursing a sick woman. “We knew of the troubles between my daughter and her husband,” said Mr. Kelly yesterday afternoon, “but we never advised her to leave him, although he was a brute to her.”

When Mrs. King left her husband he would not allow her to take the child, and it is said he kept the little one as a means to compel the mother to return. He lived alone with the child but was not an unqualified success as a housekeeper. In fact the house looked more like a sty than a human habitation. Here, in misery and squalor, he nursed his revengeful feelings against his wife and conceived the idea of the crime.

He took the child to the home of his wife’s uncle, H. W. Stevens, 378 North Coit Avenue several days ago. Early yesterday morning he went to Mr. Stevens, and he was in destitute circumstances and asked for help. This was refused. He returned home and sent word to his wife to come and get her child. She evidently feared him, for instead of going to the house, she went to the residence of a neighbor, George Gray, and sent for her husband. He came and asked her to go to the house. She said: “I will go to get the baby, but I will never live with you again.”

Together they went across lots to the little house. She did not want to enter but he insisted, and the neighbors saw them go inside. After this, no one knows what happened. It is believed that the mother, not finding her child, attempted to leave the house. The husband grabbed her and a struggle ensued. He dragged her into the miserable little room, which served as a bedroom and here she struggled desperately. His brute strength prevailed and he forced her backwards across the bed with her head against the wall. With one hand upon her throat, he drew a heavy revolver, placed the muzzle against her head and sent a bullet crashing through her brain. Turning the weapon to his own head he fired a second shot and fell across her body.

These two shots aroused the neighbors and they hurried to the house. The door was not open and J. W. Burton was the first to enter. The woman was dead. Her husband still breathed, but was desperately wounded. She was fully dressed, not having even removed her hat or cloak, and he was also fully dressed. Their blood was rapidly soaking the bed clothing and a pool upon the floor was forming.

Coroner Bradish was summoned and medical assistance was also called for the man, but he was beyond all aid. He lived until 2:35 and died without regaining consciousness. The bodies were then removed to O’Brien’s Undertaking rooms and an inquest will be held today.

King has two brothers, J. J. King of Whitneyville and Lysander King of Cedar Springs. They were notified at once of the tragedy.

The sensational and tragic story made the rounds of the newspapers. The Grand Rapids Herald reported,

Frenzied by jealousy and domestic infelicity, Myron A. King shot two bullets into the brain of his wife Cora about 10 o’clock yesterday morning, killing her instantly, and a third bullet through his own head, from which he died four hours later.

The shocking double tragedy occurred in King’s residence at no. 908 [?] Dean Street in the north end and was first known by J. W. Burton, a neighbor residing at no. 306, a short distance away. Mr. Burton was sawing wood in his backyard when he heard screams coming from the King residence, followed by three revolver shots in rapid succession. After the shots Burton said he heard the cries of a puppy and thought perhaps King had killed a dog. All was quiet and hearing nothing more and seeing no stir about the house his suspicions were aroused that something was wrong. He went to a store a short distance away so that he might walk by the house for the purpose of looking into it to see what King was doing. The front door stood ajar, but all was quiet inside. He saw and heard nothing from within and when he returned from the store the same quietness prevailed about the premises. Burton felt timid about going into the house and asked a neighbor to accompany him in to investigate. He could get no one to go in with him and he went to Patrolmen Price’s residence to give the alarm. He and the patrolman returned to the King residence and upon entering beheld the awful result of the shots fired a few moments before.

Across a dirty blood-soaked bed lay the body of Mrs. Cora King with her head resting on a pillow wet with her life’s blood. She was dead. By her side was the almost lifeless and unconscious body of Myron A. King, gasping in the throes of death with a bullet hole through his head, the ball having entered the right temple and come out through the left. In his right hand firmly grasped was a .38 caliber British bulldog revolver with three empty chambers. The brain was oozing from the wound and the old quilt upon which the head rested was saturated with blood. There was no person present in the room with the murdered woman and the dying suicide when the officer and Mr. Burton entered. Mrs. King was fully dressed wearing her rubber shoes and wrap. Mr. King wore a full suit. . . . The house was . . . devoid of furniture, and the bedroom in which the bodies lay was separated from the main room with but a partition of lath. The room was cold and cheerless, and several of the windows were covered with rough boards. There was great excitement in the vicinity of the double tragedy and a large crowd of neighbors gathered to view the sickening scene. Coroner Bradish was notified and had the remains of Mrs. King taken to O’Brien’s undertaking rooms and left King to die on his murderous bed in charge of neighbors. King remained unconscious until 2:30 when he died. His remains were also taken to O’Brien’s.

King and his wife had not been living together during the last four weeks, she having left him and their only child a little boy 2 years old and gone to work for Mrs. William Flemming on Madison Street. In the meantime King lived at home with the child, leaving it with neighbors whenever he secured work for a day or two. Within the last few days he had made arrangements to go to Berlin [Saranac or Marne] to cut wood, and had shipped a portion of his household goods there. He intended to start yesterday afternoon and last Monday morning he called at Mrs. George Gray’s on Madison Street, where his wife had been staying since last Friday, she having finished working for Mrs. Flemming. He took their little boy with him and told his wife that he would not be so hard hearted as she, that he brought the little boy to her that she might kiss him good-bye before he took him to Berlin. Mrs. Gray heard some of the conversation between King and his wife and says that King asked her if she had changed her mind in regard to living with him. She replied that she had not, and that she was going to work at the Michigan House as a chambermaid. King returned home and stayed at his house Monday night. Yesterday morning [Tuesday] he took the little boy over to William Stevens on Coit Avenue, where he had left him many times before, saying that his house was cold and would like to have Mrs. Stevens take care of him a few hours until he could get the remainder of his goods packed ready for shipment. Mrs. Stevens was an aunt to Mrs. King, and she kept the boy as King requested.. King then went to Mrs. Grays on Madison Street, where his wife was temporarily staying. The Gray family were eating breakfast, and King asked his wife for a conference after the morning meal. She consented and he remained seated. Mrs. Gray says King was very pale when he entered the home but did not appear to be vexed. He remarked that he had “put in a bad night” and that he had not slept. He said the walk to Gray’s made him sweat. Mrs. King made a light remark about his sweating in winter, but he did not reply.

After Mrs. King had finished breakfast her husband repeated the question of the day previous as to her willingness to again live with him but she was stubborn and refused. He asked if she would take their little boy who is a cripple and she said she would. She promised to take care of him and assured her husband that he could see him at any time but she would not again live with him. He said the child was over to Mrs. Stevens’ where he left him in the morning. Mrs. King had not been on friendly terms with the Stevens family for some time, and she told her husband she would not go there after the baby. He told her she could go to their home and wait until he brought the child from Stevens and she consented to do it. Mr. and Mrs. King left the Gray residence together, and that was the last heard of them by Mrs. Gray until the awful tragedy was announced.

Mrs. Nases of no. 161 Ann Street, who lives a short distance from the King residence, says she saw King and his wife standing on their front porch about 10 o’clock yesterday morning, and they appeared to be engaged in earnest conversation. Finally Mrs. King sat down upon the railing surrounding the porch, and King took hold of her arm as if to lead her into the house. She resisted, and remained seated. King appeared to be talking earnestly and to be coaxing his wife to go with him into the house. After they had talked this way about fifteen minutes Mrs. Nases saw them enter the house together and that was the last she heard of them.

It is surmised that King premeditated his horrible deed for several days, and that yesterday morning’s work was the result of carefully planned details. The surroundings in the little room in which the bloody work was done showed that a violent tussel had taken place. A stand was tipped over and a lamp lay shattered in pieces upon the floor. It is thought that King and his wife were sitting on the edge of the bed when the shot was fired and that before firing he threw his left arm around her neck, choking her so that she could not utter loud screams while with his right he sent two balls into her brain. One of the balls entered her right eye and the other in the forehead a little above. The skin was burned and discolored, showing that the revolver had been held in close proximity to her head when the fatal shots were fired. Coroner Bradish empaneled a jury and he will hold an inquest at 10 o’clock this morning in his offices.

Monday night when King went to Mrs. Stevens he appeared to be badly dejected. He told Mrs. Stevens he had nothing to live for since he did not know what to do. He said the trouble between him and his wife was the result of the interference of another man whom he did not name. He said his wife had been attending dances where beer was sold and that she had not been keeping good company of late. He had made similar complaints to other neighbors during the summer.

The dead woman was a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Adam Kelly of no. 13 Island Street, and was about 20 years old. She was married to King four years ago in this city.

King was about 46 years old and had been mixed up in matrimonial affairs on two previous occasions. His first wife died and the second, “Cad” White, left him a few years ago to live with one George Lardie, whom she afterwards married. He was a stone mason but had been out of work for some time. He was arrested some time ago with as gang of chicken thieves and was tried in the police court. He was considered to be an industrious fellow, but his domestic affairs had unnerved him of late so that he was nearly a wreck.

Indeed, the murder-suicide grabbed the attention of the entire city.

All day yesterday a steady stream of morbidly curious people passed in and out of O’Brien’s undertaking rooms to view the remains of Myron A. King and his wife. The bodies of the murderer and his victim rested upon slabs in the morgue without flowers or other tributes from friends. The face of the unfortunate woman was filled with powder, showing how close to her head the revolver was held when the shot was fired, and a small round hole directly over her nose, between the eyebrows, showed true had been the aim. The visitors were men and women, children being excluded, and most of them were attracted by mere curiosity.

The coroner’s jury heard the testimony of the neighbors yesterday morning and rendered a verdict of murder and suicide according to the facts already given.

On November 30 the Kelly family held funeral services for their daughter in their residence on Island Street and Cora was buried in Valley City (now Oak Hill) cemetery. Myron’s brothers made arrangements for his burial and he was buried at the expense of the County in Whitneyville cemetery, Kent County. His first wife and son Willie are also buried in Whitneyville cemetery.

The son Charles was placed under the guardianship of Peleg King of Cedar springs, Kent County, who subsequently applied and received a pension for the minor child Charles King (no. 448632).

Tuesday, June 02, 2009

Edmund W. King

Edmund W. King was born in 1843 or 1844 in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County, Michigan, the son of John (1798-1863) and Joanna (Riorden, 1821-1874).

Edmund’s parents emigrated from Ireland and came to Michigan sometime before 1841. By 1850 they had settled in Grand Rapids, Kent County where John worked as a merchant and Edmund attended school with his older brother John. By 1860 Edmund was working as a shoemaker and living with his family in Grand Rapids’ First Ward where his father worked as the ward tax collector. (His cousin Edmund Riorden also lived in Grand Rapids’ First Ward with his family; Riorden would join Company F in 1861.)

Edmund stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 17 years old when he enlisted with his parents’ consent in Company A on May 13, 1861. Edmund was taken prisoner on June 25, 1862, while on picket duty near Richmond, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment on August 15 at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

He was subsequently hospitalized until he was discharged on October 21, 1862, at Fort McHenry, Maryland for “spinal irritation and chronic hepatitis caused by as he says the fall of a tree at Fair Oaks, June 25, 1862.”

It is not known if Edmund survived the war or if he returned to his home in Michigan after his discharge from the army.

No pension seems to be available.

In 1870 Joanna was still living in Grand Rapids’ First Ward.

Monday, June 01, 2009

Francis “Frank” G. Kimball

Francis “Frank” G. Kimball was born in 1838.

Francis was 23 years old and possibly living in Kent County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. George Miller of Company A, who shared a tent with Francis in the winter of 1861-1862, wrote home on November 21, 1861, that he thought Kimball “a good natured fellow.”

By August of 1862 Francis was employed as a wagoner, probably detached to Brigade headquarters where he continued to work through June of 1863. He was reported missing in action on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and in fact had been taken prisoner. He was eventually released and was apparently mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

According to one source “Fran” also served in Companies A and E, Third Pennsylvania cavalry.

It is not known if Francis returned to Michigan after his discharge.

In 1883 he applied for a pension (no. 472672) but the certificate was never granted.

He was married to a woman named Sarah.

He may have settled in Philadelphia after the war.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 370272). In the Grand Army of the Republic Journal of the 1888 National Encampment, his widow, who was then living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, wanted to obtain the addresses of any former comrade of Company A who knew her husband. She pointed out that he was taken prisoner at Gettysburg and that she was “desirous of obtaining a pension,” and all replies were to go through John Hayes of the Grand Army of the Republic U.S. Grant post in Philadelphia. However the certificate was never granted. A pension was filed subsequently on behalf of at least one minor child and granted (no. 435726). In 1890 one Sarah Thornton was listed as formerly the widow of Francis Kimball, and she was then living in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.