Saturday, January 30, 2010

John B. Osgood

John B. Osgood was born in 1843 in Michigan, the son of Hester (b. 1827 in New York).

By 1850 John was living with his mother and siblings in Grass Lake, Jackson County; nearby lived a farmer named Caleb Osgood working with the Preston family on a farm very close to the Colburn Blake farm. By 1860 John was attending school and he and his sister Harriet were living with the Colburn Blake family in Orangeville, Barry County; next door lived Colburn Osgood (b. 1834 in either Michigan or New York and John’s older brother) who was working as a carpenter.

In any case John stood 5’5” with gray eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer probably living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on January 1, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Campbell, Ionia County, and was mustered January 5. He joined the Regiment on February 10 and was apparently shot in the right hip on or about May 2, probably during the opening action of the Wilderness campaign. He was subsequently hospitalized and was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. John remained absent sick through February of 1865, and probably until he was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war John returned to Michigan, probably to his home in Barry County.

He married Michigan native Maria (1851-1936) and they had at least two children: Clarisa (b. 1869) and Ina (b. 1873), and possibly a third daughter Hattie.

By 1870 John was working as a farmer and living in Prairieville, Barry County with his wife and daughter; also living with them was Colburn Osgood. John was living with his wife two daughters in Orangeville, Barry County in 1880 and still living in Orangeville in 1890 and around 1900.

John was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and of G.A.R. England Post No. 301 in Orangeville. In 1888 he applied for and received a pension (no. 550156).

John probably died on December 13, 1908, possibly in Plainwell, Allegan County or in Orangeville, and was buried in Oak Hill cemetery, section 11 lot 3, in Orangeville.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 675632).

Friday, January 29, 2010

William H. Osborn

William H. Osborn was born in 1834, probably in Bennington, Vermont. (His discharge papers listed “Remington, Vermont” as his place of birth; but there is no "Remington," Vermont.)

William left Vermont and came to western Michigan. He was possibly the same William Osborn who was married in 1859 to New York native Celestia (b. 1843). By 1860 William was working as a farm laborer and he and his new wife were living with the Isaac Ayres family (possibly Celestia’s family) in Keene, ionia County.

In any case, William stood 5’10” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 28-year-old farmer probably living in Keene, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company C on February 27, 1862, at Saranac, Ionia County for 3 years. He was struck by a piece of cannon shell in the right hand on December 13, 1862, at the battle of Fredericksburg, Virginia, and subsequently sent to the Regimental hospital. He was transferred to a general hospital in February of 1863, probably at Portsmouth Grove, Rhode Island (date unknown), where he was discharged on March 13, 1863, for “loss of middle finger of right hand from shell wound.” He also suffered from “general nervous derangement with feeble action of heart.”

It is not known if William returned to Michigan. (He may have reentered the service in Company A, First Michigan cavalry. There is also one William H. Osborn who served in Company E of the First Michigan Engineers & Mechanics and who is buried in Lee Township cemetery, Allegan County, Michigan.)

In June of 1863 he applied for and received a pension (no. 17310), based on his service in both Company H (or K), Second Michigan infantry and Company C, Third Michigan infantry.

Thursday, January 28, 2010

Sylvester Osborn

Sylvester Osborn was born in 1832 in New York.

Sylvester was 29 years old and possibly living in Barry County, Michigan, when he became as a substitute for Tunis Collier, who had been drafted on February 10, 1863, for 9 months from Prairieville, Barry County.

Although Sylvester originally enlisted in Unassigned he was sent to Company E when he joined the Regiment on March 10, 1864, and in April was on detached service with the wagon and ambulance trains. He was discharged upon expiration of his nine-months’ term of service on November 10, 1863.

It is not known if Sylvester ever returned to Michigan.

He married New York native Amanda W. (b. 1847), and they had at least one child: Flora (b. 1876).

He was probably residing in Ogden, Weber County, Utah in 1870, and in Utah in 1876. By 1880 he was working as a miner and living with his wife Amanda and daughter in American Fork Canyon, Utah County.

He was married a second time to one Mary C.

He was still living in Utah in 1911.

In 1897 he applied for and received a pension (no. 1041587).

Sylvester died on January 20, 1919, at the Soldier’s Home in California, and was presumably buried there.

His widow was residing in Illinois in April of 1919 when she applied for a pension (application no. 1139710) but the certificate was never granted.

Wednesday, January 27, 2010

Corydon Orcutt Jr.

Corydon Orcutt Jr. was born in 1832 or 1833 in Genesee County, New York, the son of Corydon Sr. (b. 1807) and Jemina (Johnson, b. 1810).

New Yorker Corydon Sr. married Connecticut-born Jemina and they eventually settled in New York where they resided for some years before moving west. Corydon Sr. moved his family from New York to Michigan sometime between 1848 and 1850 by which time they were living in Plainfield, Kent County where Corydon Sr. and Jr. both worked as laborers.

Corydon Jr. married New Yorker Catharine (b. 1835), possibly in New York, and they had at least three children: Sarah (b. 1855), William (b. 1856) and Esther (b. 1859).

Corydon (or Coriden) may have been living in New York around 1855 when their first child was born but by 1856 Corydon had returned to Michigan. By 1860 Corydon Jr. was working as a shingle-maker and living with his wife and three children in Solon, Kent County; his neighbors on both sides were also shingle-makers. One of these was John Olim who was living with Leonard Parrish, and Leonard would also join the Third Michigan.

Corydon stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 32-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on January 30, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Cato, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 27, was taken prisoner on June 2, 1864 at Gaines’ Mills, Virginia (near Spotsylvania), and was first confined in one of the prisons in Richmond, Virginia on June 3 and then sent to Andersonville prison on June 8. He was transferred as missing in action and a prisoner-of-war to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

On August 16 Corydon was admitted to the prison hospital at Andersonville where he died the same day of enteritis. He was buried in Andersonville National Cemetery: grave no. 5846.

In 1865 Catharine applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 66033). In 1868 (?) an application was filed on behalf of one or more minor children (no. 146991).

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

John D. O’Neil

John D. O’Neil was born in 1836.

John was 25 years old and probably living in Detroit, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was reported as a provost guard in July of 1862, a provost guard at Brigade headquarters from August of 1862 through February of 1863, on detached service with the ambulance train in October of 1863 through May of 1864, and was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

John was probably living in Detroit when he was admitted on December 6, 1873, to Harper Hospital in Detroit (the predecessor to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home hospital) for “inflammation of the brain,” and he died at the hospital on December 22, 1873. He was presumably buried in Detroit.

No pension seems to be available.

Monday, January 25, 2010

James O’Neil

James O’Neil was born in 1838 in New York.

James left New York and had settled in western Michigan by 1860 when he was probably a news dealer living with and/or working for Bradley Salter, a saloon-keeper in Muskegon, Muskegon County.

James was 23 years old and probably still living in Muskegon when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. He was wounded in the right lung while the regiment was engaged in the Peach Orchard, during the second day of the battle of Gettysburg, on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, and subsequently died from his wounds on July 3 or 5 in one of the hospitals at Gettysburg.

In either case, he was buried in the Michigan plot, Gettysburg National Cemetery: section A, grave 8.

No pension seems to be available.

Sunday, January 24, 2010

Lewis C. Olmstead

Lewis C. Olmstead was born in 1846 in Auburn, Cayuga County, New York, the son of Orville.

Lewis’s family left New York and eventually settled in western Michigan. By 1860 Lewis was attending school with his older sister Elizabeth (who was working as a domestic) and along with another older sister Mary (who was working as a teacher) were living with the Eli Sheldon family on a farm in Wright, Ottawa County. (Elizabeth would marry George Ames, who was also from Wright and who would also enlist in Company E in early 1864.)

Lewis stood 5’7” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer probably still living in Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company E on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day. (His brother-in-law George Ames had enlisted in Company E the month before.)

Lewis joined the Regiment on March 27, and was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.
He was reported absent sick from June 2 through October of 1864, and in fact he was treated for chronic diarrhea at Harewood hospital in Washington, DC, and was reported in a Washington, DC, hospital suffering from diarrhea in late July.

He was furloughed from the hospital in at the very end of August for 30 days and returned to the hospital on November 14, 1864, but according to a later statement he asked for and was granted several additional extension sof his furlough, lastying for a total of 100 days -- nevertheless heis listed as having returned to duty on November 21, 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Lewis returned to western Michigan and was living and working as a farmer in Berlin (Marne), Ottawa County in late 1865 when he applied for and received a pension (no. 105782), drawing $4.00 per month in 1875 and $20 per month by 1908. He probably resided in Berlin (present-day Marne) off and on during the late 1860s -- although it is quite possible that he was living in Kent County just across the line from Ottawa County.

Anyway, Lewis was reportedly residing in Berlin when he married New York native Mariba E. Stone (b. 1850), of Wright, Ottawa County, on September 20, 1868 in Lisbon, Kent County, and they had at least five children: Charles L. (1872), Cora M. (1874), Hattie J. (1878), Glenn W. (b. 1884) and Mariba (b. 1889).

In 1870 Lewis was working as a farm laborer and he and his wife were living with the Eli Sheldon family in Berlin, Wright, Ottawa County; also living with the Sheldon family was Lillian Ames, the 8-year-old daughter of George Ames who died during the war and who was Lewis’ brother-in-law. Curiously, Lewis’ other child Freddie was living with his mother and stepfather in Ottawa County in 1870.)

Lewis eventually moved his family to Nebraska and by 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Inavale, Webster County, Nebraska. (At some point probably lived in Iowa as well.) By 1891 Lewis was living in Red Cloud, Webster County, Nebraska, suffering from severe chronic bronchitis; he was still living in Red Cloud in 1908.

He was a member of the James A. Garfield Grand Army of the Republic Post No. 80 in Red Cloud. In 1865 he applied for and received a pension (no. 105782).

Lewis died in Des Moines, Iowa, on February 15, 1909, and was presumably buried in Des Moines, or perhaps in Red Cloud.

Saturday, January 23, 2010

King Richard Olmstead

King Richard Olmstead was born in October 1, 1842, in Ontario, Canada, the son of Richard (1804-1871) and Rebecca Jane (Wiltse or Wiltsey, 1806-1884).

King’s parents were both born in Canada and married in about 1829 in Johnstown, Ontario, Canada. In 1831 they were living near Athens, Grenville County, Ontario, and probably remained in Grenville County, Ontario until the late 1840s when the family immigrated to the United States. By 1847 the family had settled in Boston, Ionia County, Michigan and by 1850 King was living with his family on a small farm in Boston, Ionia County.

About 1853 or 1854 King made the acquaintance of Rufus Buxton, whose family had presumably settled in Odessa, Ionia County, in the early 1850s. In fact, King and Rufus would enlist together in Comapny D, Third Michgian during the war. By 1860 Richard (who owned $1000 worth of real estate) was living with his wife and son Richard – probably King R. – in Boston, Ionia County.

King stood 5’8” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer living in Ionia County when he enlisted along with Rufus Buxton in Company D on March 8, 1862, at Saranac, for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) He was a provost guard in July, absent sick in August, on provost guard duty, probably at the Third Brigade headquarters from October of 1862 through February of 1863, and was an orderly at Brigade headquarters from March through May. He was a Brigade provost guard from June through July, a guard at Third Brigade headquarters from October of 1863 through March of 1864.

It is quite likely that King was shot in the right shoulder during the Wilderness and Spotsylvania campaigns in early May, after which he was hospitalized.

According to Captain Moses B. Houghton who commanded Company D, King was wounded by a shell in the right collarbone on May 5 at the beginning of the Wilderness campaign and subsequently hospitalized. On May 11 King was admitted to Columbian College hospital in Washington, DC, and on May 15 he was transferred to Patterson Park hospital in Baltimore, Maryland. On June 21 he entered the hospital at Camp Parole, Annapolis, Maryland.

He was still absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick through November of 1864. It is unclear if King ever rejoined the regiment after consolidation. In any case, King was mustered out on March 2 or 8, 1865, at Petersburg, Virginia.

After he was discharged from the army King eventually returned to Ionia County.

He was married to New York native Fidelia Denny (b. 1851), on January 29, 1868, in Boston, Ionia County.

By 1870 King was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Odessa, Ionia County (his parents lived in Boston, Ionia County). They lived next door to Rufus Buxton who had also served in Company D. King and his wife were still living in Odessa in 1880. (Rufus Buxton was still living near by as well. King’s mother Jane was living with her grandson Rufus Olmstead and his wife in Boston, Ionia County.) By 1883 King was living in Saranac. He was still residing in Saranac in 1886, 1888, 1890 and 1894, but sometime around 1895 he was living in Long Beach, California. By 1908 he was living in Monrovia, California, and by 1915 he was residing at 446 Linden Avenue in Long Beach, California.

By 1920 King and Fidelia were living with their nephew Verne Decker and his family in Perris, Riverside County, California. By 1926 King was living at 442 E. 9th Street in Riverside, California. (He had been under the care of his niece and housekeeper, Mrs. Jane Hunter since about 1924. She was reportedly the daughter of Solomon Olmstead, King’s brother.)

In 1875 he applied for and received a pension (no. 139,534), and drawing $8.00 per month by 1883 and $50 and $72 per month by 1926. King was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

King was probably a widower when he died of heart disease (“angina pectoris” as a result of arteriosclerosis) on August 31, 1926 in Riverside, California, and was buried in Evergreen cemetery on September 2 (presumably in Riverside).

Friday, January 22, 2010

Willard R. Olds

Willard R. Olds was born on September 9, 1845, in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, the son of Rachel (b. 1807 in New York).

Willard’s family left Ohio sometime after 1845 and eventually settled in Michigan. By 1860 Willard was living with his mother and older sister and they were all living with the George Chickering family in Orleans, Ionia County, where Willard worked as a farm laborer.

He stood 5’8” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 16 years old and probably living with his mother in Saranac, Ionia County when, according to Raymond Steele, the family biographer, he enlisted in Company C on February 16, 1862, at Saranac for 3 years, and was mustered on February 21 in Saranac. He was wounded during the battle of Chancellorsville on May 3, 1863, and was reportedly wounded a second time in June at Brandy Station, Virginia.

Willard (or William) was fined one month’s pay in July or August by order of Regimental court martial, although his offense is not revealed in the available records. However, according to his grandson, Willard “was on duty with the ‘trains’, guarding official baggage, when he was overcome with curiosity as to the purpose of the continuous cannonading coming from Seminary ridge. He left his post” near “Little Round Top and walked to a promontory just to the east of the Union line, south of the cemetery. He arrived in time to see the Virginians step off” and “’in magnificent’ formation marched toward the Union center. He was well aware of the fact he had abandoned his post,” Steele continued, “but was” according to Steele’s father, “’spell-bound’ watching these formations come on with military precision, under the heaviest of defensive fire.” Steele added that Willard “was 17 that afternoon, but 75 years later, according to my father, he could describe the action with the vividness of the day he observed it.”

In November of 1863 Willard was reported missing in action at Mine Run, Virginia, and in fact he had been taken prisoner at Mine Run on November 27 and was hospitalized in the enlisted section of Libby prison hospital in Richmond, Virginia between mid-December and late January of 1864. . According to Raymond Steele, Willard “spent some weeks in . . . the enlisted infirmary of Libby prison” and was sent on to Andersonville prison in mid-February of 1864. “I do not know how long he was there,” Mr. Steele wrote of his grandfather, “however, had it been much longer, I am certain I would not be preparing this correspondence.”

Willard was either confined in Andersonville until he was discharged or he may have been transferred to a prison in South Carolina and subsequently to one in Florida. In any case, he was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was discharged on June 24, 1865, at Detroit “by reason of telegraph from War Department.”

After the war Willard returned to Ionia County.

He married Michigan native Gertrude Russell (b. 1851) and they had at least two children: a son Robert and Edna (b. 1873) and Mrs. Carl Steele (b. 1880).

In 1870 he was working as a laborer and living withh his wife in Smyrna, Otisco Township, Ionia County. (His mother was also living in Otisco that year.) By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and daughter and they were all living with his wife’s parents in Otisco. He was residing in Smyrna, Ionia County in 1882, 1883, 1888 and 1890, and in Belding by 1894 and by 1911 he was living at 415 Bridge Street in Belding. He served on the Belding city council and for many years was employed in the greenhouse and florist business in the Belding area. By 1920 Willard was living in Belding with his wife and their grandson Marion Steele; Willard and Gertrude were still living in Belding in 1930 (he was worth about $3000).

Willard was a member of the GAR, as well as a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association and the Michigan Association of Union Ex-Prisoners, and he received pension no. 162,608, dated October, 1879, at the rate of $4.00 per month.

Willard has the distinction of being the last known surviving member of the Old Third Michigan infantry when he died Tuesday night, August 30, 1937, at his home in Belding. Funeral services were held on Friday at 10:00 a.m. at the Hall & Chicy chapel and he was buried in Otisco cemetery.

Thursday, January 21, 2010

Thomas O’Hearn

Thomas O’Hearn was born in 1847, possibly in Cincinnati, Ohio, the son of Margaret.

Thomas stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 18 years old and probably working as a farmer in Muskegon County or perhaps in Tallmadge, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company E on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, Muskegon County, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on March 27, and was quite possibly wounded in early May of 1864.

He was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was either killed in action on June 16, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia, or he may have died on July 16, 1864, from wounds received near Petersburg ( or perhaps in early May). In any case, he was presumably among the unknown soldiers interred in Petersburg National Cemetery.

In 1867 his mother Margaret was still living in Michigan when she applied for a dependent’s pension (no. 656903) but the certificate was never granted.

Wednesday, January 20, 2010

James O’Donahue

James O’Donahue was born in 1838 in Ireland.

James immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan by 1860 when he was a clerk living with and/or working for Patrick Davoll, also from Ireland, and a farmer in Big Prairie, Newaygo County.

He stood 5’9” with blue eyes, auburn hair and a light complexion and was 23 years old and residing in Newaygo County when he enlisted as First Corporal in Company K on May 13, 1861. He had been promoted to Sergeant by the time he was shot in the right thigh on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently hospitalized at Fort McHenry, Maryland in September. He remained absent sick in a general hospital until he was discharged on February 26, 1863, at Columbian College hospital, Washington, DC, for a “gunshot wound at the junction of upper and middle third of right thigh, injuring sciatic nerve and causing wasting of muscles with partial loss of motion.”

It is not known if James returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army.

No pension seems to be available.

Tuesday, January 19, 2010

Louis Ockert

Louis Ockert was born in 1834 or 1840 in Baden, Germany, probably the son of Anthony (b. 1816) and Mary (b. 1818).

Both Anthony and Mary were born in Baden, and Louis probably immigrated to America with his family and settled in western Michigan by 1863.

Louis (or Lewis) stood 5’7” with hazel eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 29 or 23 years old and probably working as a farmer in Alpine, Kent County or Grand Rapids’ First Ward when he enlisted in Company C on December 29, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Alpine or Grand Rapids’ First Ward, and was mustered January 9, 1864. He joined the Regiment on February 18 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Louis was reported absent sick from October of 1864 through June of 1865, and was mustered out on June 13, 1865, at Chester hospital in Chester, Pennsylvania.

Louis eventually returned to western Michigan.

He married Baden native Barbara (b. 1848), and they had at least five children: Anna (b. 1868), Christopher (b. 1870), Barbara (b. 1872), Joseph (b. 1874), Anton (b. 1878) and Louis (b. 1878).

By 1880 Louis was living with his wife and children in Wheatfield, Mecosta County. Next door lived 26-year-old Joseph Ockert and his wife. Also living in Wheatfield were Anthony and Mary Ockert, and Christopher Ockert and his family. (Chrisopher was probably Louis’ brother.)

He was living in Remus, Wheatfield Township in Mecosta County in 1890 and 1894.

He was married to his second wife Margaret and probably living in Michigan in 1889 (?) when he applied for and received a pension (no. 454531).

Lewis probably died on March 26, 1921, in Wisconsin.

In April of 1921 his widow was living in Wisconsin when she applied for a pension (application no. 1173304) but the certificate was never granted.

Monday, January 18, 2010

John Oberly

John Oberly was born on November 17, 1832 in Wurtemberg, Germany.

John immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan by the time the war broke out. (In 1860 there was one Caleb Oberly, born 1838 in Germany, living in Hastings, Barry County. Also living with Caleb was ne Eva Oberly, age 61, also born in Germany.)

John stood 5’7” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was 28 years old and possibly a farmer living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. On December 19, 1862, his commanding officer, Captain Israel C. Smith, wrote that “During the past eight months he has been subject to fits and in [my] opinion is unfit for a soldier.” The Regimental surgeon Dr. James Grove, wrote that “This applicant had an attack of typhoid fever about a year ago last August [and] was sick in hospital about two months. The first attack of epilepsy occurred about the latter part of October following. Since then he states that he has had from eight to ten fits. They do not occur at anything like regular intervals but are apparently induced by fatigue or excitement. He is extremely unfit to perform the duties of a soldier.” He was discharged for epilepsy on January 13, 1863, at Camp Pitcher, Virginia.

John eventually returned to western Michigan.

He was married to Ohio native Margaret A. (1842-1932), and they had at least seven children: Ellie (b. 1868), Charles (b. 1870), Mary (b. 1872), Arletta (b. 1873), Nancy (b. 1875), Katie (b. 1877) and George (b. 1879).

(In 1870 one Caleb Oberly was living in Vergennes, Kent County; possibly a brother of John’s since they were both living in Lowell in 1880. Also in 1870, one Jane Oberly, age 71 and born in Wurtemberg, was living in Lowell.)

By 1880 John was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Lowell, Kent County. He was living in Alto, Kent County in 1887 and 1888, in Lowell, Kent County in 1890, and for many years worked as a farmer.

He was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Wilson Post No. 87 in Lowell.

In 1886 he applied for and received a pension (no. 406195).

John died of aortic insufficiency in Bowne, Kent County, on September 6, 1910, and was buried in Merriman cemetery, Kent County: B-191-5.

His widow was still living in Michigan, probably in Lowell, in late September of 1910 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 711689).

Sunday, January 17, 2010

Everson E. Norton

Everson E. Norton was born in 1830 in Orleans County, New York, the son of Daniel (b. 1792) and Catharine (b. 1795).

Connecticut native Daniel married New Jersey-born Catharine sometime before 1821 by which time the family had settled in New York. In 1850 Everson was working as a farmer and living with his family in Mt. Morris, Livingston County, New York. His older brother Anson worked as a constable in Mt. Morris and lived nearby with his wife Sarah.

Everson was probably married to New York native Elizabeth (b. 1833), presumably in New york, and they had at least one child: Charles (b. 1856).

(This is deduced from the fact that Anson and his wife Sarah, who had no children listed with them in the 1860 census, listed a 13-year-old named "Charles Norton" living with them in 1870. Additionally, we know that “Ephas,” who was listed in the 1860 and is most likely in fact "Evereson,", was born in 1820 in New York, which is a match with Everson, and had a son named Charles who was about 3 years old in 1860. We also know that Anson was listed as the guardian of Everson’s child or children.)

They were living in New York in 1856. Everson eventually moved his family to Michigan, along with or joining his brother Anson. By 1860 Everson was working as a farmer and living with his wife and son in Paris, Kent County; also living with them was 18-year-old Marion Norton. That same year Anson and his wife Sarah were living in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward where Anson worked as a the County sheriff. (In 1859-60 Anson was residing at the corner of Sumner and Shawmut Streets on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids.)

Everson stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 31 years old and was possibly living with his brother Anson, when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. (Company A was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, specifically the Valley City Guards, or VCG, under the command of Captain Samuel Judd, who would also command Company A.)

He was discharged on November 30, 1861, at the Regimental hospital near Fort Lyon, Virginia, for consumption “which has made its appearance since he entered the service.”

After he was discharged from the army Everson returned to Grand Rapids and may have been a member of Company E, Eighteenth Veterans’ Reserve Corps, possibly stationed at Camp Lee, the draft rendezvous in Grand Rapids.

In October of 1862 he applied for a pension (no. 3181), but the certificate was never granted.

Everson was probably a widower and living with Anson in Grand Rapids when he died, probably of consumption, at 10:00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 6, 1864. He was buried in Grand Rapids’ Oak Hill cemetery: section 10 lot 99. (There is no Elizabeth Norton buried in Oak Hill or apparently anywhere else in Grand Rapids.)

In November of 1864 Everson’s brother Anson apparently made an application on behalf of one or more of Everson’s minor children which was granted (no. 49253).

Saturday, January 16, 2010

David Wilson Northrup

David Wilson Northrup was born on May 1, 1824, in Fairfield, Connecticut, the son of Thomas J. (1805-1884) and Emily (Benedict, b. 1804).

David’s parents were married around 1824 (?), probably in Connecticut where Emily was born and they eventually settled in Fairfield County, Connecticut. Thomas was living in Danbury, Fairfield County in 1840 and in Bethel, Fairfield County, Connecticut in 1860.

David married New York native Mary Ann Stebbins (b. 1828) on June 8, 1846 in Borodino, Onondaga County, New York, and they had at least three children: Myron E. (b. 1848), Frank Burley (1852-1899) and Carrie Louisa (b. 1860).

By 1850 David and his wife had settled in Lysander, Onondaga County, New York where David worked as a wagon maker.

David and his family eventually left New York and had settled in Michigan by 1859-60 when he was working as a carriage-maker and living on the east side of Scribner between Sixth and Ann Streets on the west side of the Grand River, and in 1860 he was working as a carriage-maker and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward; also living with Northrup was Sumner Bacon and his family and a young teacher named Sarah Stebbins, probably Mary’s younger sister. Just two houses away lived Baker Borden who would become captain of Company B. And next door to David lived Wilson Jones and his family; Wilson too would join Company B in 1861 as would a young clerk living with Jones named Allen Foote.

David was 36 years old and probably still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. (Company B was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, in particular the Grand Rapids Artillery, under Captain Baker Borden, who would also command Company B.)

He was promoted to Corporal on January 1, 1862, but was quite possible taken ill sometime in the first half of the year and reported on duty at a hospital in July of 1862 and as a hospital nurse in August. He eventually rejoined the Regiment and was promoted to Sergeant on December 15, 1862.

David was serving with the regiment at the battle of Chancellorssville, on May 1-2, 1863. On June 7, he was with the regiment near Belle Plain, Virginia, when he wrote to former Third Michigan and Company B soldier Fred Stow who was back home in Michigan.

My Dear Fred,

Yours of the first has been received. According to request I proceed to answer by return mail. By the by, to answer your inquiries I shall necessarily have to be brief in some parts. I will give each day’s experience in our last battle separately. You speak of our condition upon that day one year ago (31st). Yes, many such days have we seen since but hope to witness not many more. The Sabbath. Yes, the Sabbath of the North as you well know, unknown here. I long for the return of those quiet days of rest. Rest to both body and soul. But we have a part to perform in the great Drama of life. Let us act this part like men. Do our duty to our God, our Country, and our selves, leaving the results with Him who controls all things. Strange and inexplicable times are His ways, but righteous are His judgments always. Misfortunes and disappointments cluster around our path, but they only are intended for our improvement if we rightly interpret their design. But to my story. We were started about noon one rainy day by the headquarters bugle sounding the pack-up call.

One hour from this, on the 28th day of April, saw us well upon our march. We took the direction we traveled before down the river. Spent that night nearby upon the banks of the Rappahannock. The next day continued our march and halted upon the banks of the river out of sight in the woods. Laid there the 29th and part of the thirtieth. About noon we started, that is all of [the] army upon the left, for the extreme right about twenty miles up the river. As I said we started about noon and marched near 20 miles before we camped. April 30th we crossed the river in the morning in front of their redoubts now vacated and marched about five miles back and camped in the woods near the front. Could hear the firing distinctly not more than half a mile ahead. Staid there till night when we marched to the front and placed on picket strung along the line of the Fredericksburg turnpike (plank road) in one continuous line of regiments. We laid there the night of the 30th and till noon the first day of May at which time we received orders to reconnoiter in our front. We (that is the brigade) skirmished up through the wood for two miles and came out upon the enemy in an open field in front of their batteries where we laid supporting our batteries under a smart fire for some two hours. It was here that many of our regiment were wounded. The fire [was] sharp on both sides. Quite a number of prisoners came into us at this time. It getting late we started back and getting about halfway found that our old position that we left in the morning was occupied by the rebs. What was to be done? A council of war was held at Sickles quarters to decide upon what it was best to do. We supposing that we were nearly or quite surrounded it was determined to try to break through their lines. The famous Midnight Charge by Moonlight was planned and carried into effect as we shall see. This was the first day of May. A day long to be remembered by me it being my birthday, commencing my 39th year. It occurred to me several times during the day that I had spent my birthday more agreeable.

I had forgot to mention that we drove the rebs from their position in the afternoon of this day, and received great credit for the service. As I was saying the charge upon their line was determined upon in order to regain the Plank Road, our old, or first position. The order of the program was that one regiment should march in front in line of battle with loaded guns. They should march right up to the enemy’s line and fire. The second line to march with fixed bayonets (our line) about twenty rods in the rear of the first. This line [was] to rush to the charge upon the firing of the first. But it being dark we became mixed up with each other so as not to distinguish one [line] from the other. The enemy were prepared to receive us. The way the grape and minies flew around us was a caution [?] to recount. The result of the performance you have already learned by the papers. I will not go into detail in this. Suffice it [to say] we lost some in wounded and prisoners. We laid in the woods close to the reb pickets all night. Soon as it became light we had to skedaddle out in double quick the balls flying after us rather faster than I desired. It seemed all of us must get hit. The rebs followed us close, out to the open field and quickly brought their batteries to bear upon us. Our batteries were not long in getting into position. We had then retreated half a mile or more. Then commenced the most furious cannonade I ever witnessed. Our regiment was supporting a battery. This was on Sunday morning. It was here while supporting this battery that Capt. [Joseph] Mason [of Company G] was killed. The rebs came upon us and we had to back up so sudden that they had no time to take his badge [?] from him. We then retreated about two miles and made a stand which we held till we finally fell back over the river.

After crossing the river each regiment returned to its old quarters the shortest route and the best way it could. This concludes the great victory of Hooker. It did not seem to be a very great victory, but perhaps I failed to see the point. I have thus been very brief as I making this too long a letter. Besides I wish to speak of another subject and my space is somewhat limited. There are many little incidents I could relate if I were with you but cannot at present. There were none killed in our Co[mpany B, although] some [were] wounded slightly. James Scribner was wounded the worst.

You mention the report of the arrest of James [Bennett] and Almon Borden. It is too true. Their sentence is as you hear. Capt. Borden dismissed with pay [and] James cashiered, dismissed without pay. It is the opinion of all that it is unjustly hard on James. It ought to be reversed the two. Borden ought to go without pay. The charge against James was deserting his company before the enemy. He went in with us the night of the charge and was not seen till Monday morning. We all supposed him killed or taken prisoners. But Monday morning he made his appearance. He is with Al[mon Borden] in Washington at present. I do not know what they intend to do. Now do not tell anyone that I have written anything about it. It must be a severe blow to his father. I presume he will take it hard. James has been anxious, very, to get out of the service but I think at too great a sacrifice. I am very sorry and do not know hardly how to express my thoughts. I should rather have sacrificed my life than to have to have such a thing to think of. I would not let this be public even to his friends if they do not know it. You will see it in the Herald of June second or third. I do not remember which. I have not got through but must close for the want of more room. I remain, Yours, D. W. [Northrup]

Interestingly David was a witness at the court martial of Lieutenant James Bennett, of Company B in May of 1863. He was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge David returned to Grand Rapids and resumed his former occupation of carriage- and wagon-making. He was working at that trade in 1867-68 and living on Bridge Street at the toll gate house, and in 1868-69 when he was living on the west side of Broadway between Bridge and First Streets on the west side of the river. By 1870 he was working as a carriage-maker and living with his wife and three children in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward.

By 1876 David was living in Walker, Kent County when he died of consumption at his home in Walker, on Saturday October 14, 1876. The funeral service was held at the First Presbyterian church at 1:00 p.m. on Wednesday October 18, and he was buried in Greenwood cemetery: section D lot 4.

No pension seems to be available.

(There was one CHARLES J. NORTHRUP who had served in Brady’s Independent Co. of Michigan Sharpshooters and who returned to Michigan after the war where in 1865 he applied for a pension (no. 63075). His widow and children received pensions no. 183,037, dated February, 1879, drawing $10.00 per month in 1883, and by 1883 Mary was probably living in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County.)

Friday, January 15, 2010

Andrew and Edwin Nickerson

Andrew Nickerson was born in 1834 in Ontario, Canada, the son of Elisha or Elihu (1804-1888) and Mary (Winegarden, b. 1814).

New York native Elihu married Canadian-born Mary in Windham, Ontario in December of 1831. The family moved from Canada to Cattaraugus County, New York in 1838, then headed westward settling about 1840 in Lake County, Indiana, where they remained until sometime around 1848 when the family moved to Michigan. By 1850 Elisha was running a hotel in Prairieville, Barry County, where Andrew attended school with seven of his younger siblings, including his brother Edwin who would also join the Third Michigan. By 1860 Elisha or Elihu had moved the family to a farm in Leighton, Allegan County where Andrew worked as a farm laborer (along with his younger brother Edwin) and was living with his family.

He was 27 years old and probably still living in Allegan County when he enlisted as Fourth Sergeant in Company E on May 13, 1861; his younger brother Edwin would join Company E the following year.

It is quite possible that Andrew enlisted in the Hastings Rifle Company in April of 1861. That company was disbanded shortly after it arrived in Grand Rapids to join the Third Michgian infantry then forming at Cantonment Anderson south of city and its members distributed to other companies of the Regiment.

Andrew was promoted to First Sergeant on July 19 or July 23, 1861, at Hunter’s Farm, Virginia. He was subsequently promoted to Second Lieutenant and transferred to Company H on August 12, 1862, at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia, replacing Lieutenant Thomas Waters. On September 16, 1862, while the regiment was in camp near Alexandria, Virginia, Andrew wrote to the widow of John Call, formerly of Company E.

It becomes my painful duty to inform you that your husband is no more. He departed this life Sept. 8th, 1862, in the hospital at Alexandria. He died of wounds received in the battle of Groveton Aug. 29th, 1862. Early in the action he received a minie ball in the knee. He was borne from the field by his comrades. His wounds dressed and he was sent to the hospital. None suppose his wound would prove fatal, but it did. I deeply sympathize with you in your great loss. I have known your husband but little over a year yet he seemed as near to me as a brother. He was a favorite of the whole company, brave and generous to a fault. We all mourn his loss and yet almost envy him the proud death he died.

You will see by the note I enclose from the Surgeon in the Hospital that he left no effects of any value. His knapsack with his spare clothes was put aboard a vessel at Harrison’s Landing and when we received them after we returned form Manassas some of them we found to be rotted, having been exposed to the weather. Mr. Call’s was among this number. There was nothing in it except some blankets and a few clothes.

Any information that I can give you I will be most happy to impart. He had about 4 months pay due him at the time of his death.

With all respects, I remain yours truly, Andrew Nickerson, Lieut. Company E 3rd Mich Vol

In October Andrew was transferred to Company K and promoted to First Lieutenant on October 20, replacing Lieutenant Fred Stowe. He was home in Michigan during the winter of 1863, and rejoined the regiment in early March of that year. He was charged with neglect of duty, in that he reportedly forged discharge papers for a private, but nothing came of this apparently and he was never court-martialed.

Andrew was then appointed acting Regimental Quartermaster from July 13, 1863, through September, and in December he was on detached service in Michigan, probably recruiting for the Regiment.

Although he was still reported detached in Grand Rapids in January of 1864 (since December 28, 1863), he was promoted to Captain on January 18, 1864, and commissioned to date November 1, 1863. He eventually returned to the Regiment before the spring campaign of 1864, and was killed in action on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia.

According to Dan Crotty of Company F Nickerson was killed on May 7. Some years after the war Crotty wrote that during the engagement at the Wilderness, “The fearful butchery commences on the morning of the 7th, and charge after charge is made on both sides,” and at one point the Regiment had driven the rebels back inside their works. “They reform and drive us back. We take shelter in some temporary works thrown up by themselves, and here hold them in check for awhile. But they come down on us with superior numbers. We keep them on the other side for awhile, and a hand to hand fight takes place. Here is where Captain Nickerson, of company K, was killed by a bayonet thrust.”

Andrew was buried in Fredericksburg National Cemetery: grave 3550 (old 191).

In 1870 Elihu and Mary were living in Mason County where Elihu worked as a lawyer. (He owned some $6000 worth of real estate.)

Edwin Nickerson was born on March 17, 1835, in Ontario, Canada, the son of Elihu (1804-1888) and Mary (Winegarden, b. 1814).

New York native Elihu married Canadian-born Mary in Windham, Ontario in December of 1831. The family moved from Canada to Cattaraugus County, New York in 1838, then headed westward settling about 1840 in Lake County, Indiana, where they remained until sometime around 1848 when the family moved to Michigan. By 1850 Elisha was running a hotel in Priarieville, barry County, where Edwin attended school with seven of his siblings, including his older brother Andrew who would also join the Third Michigan. By 1860 Elisha had moved the family to a farm in Leighton, Allegan County where Andrew worked as a farm laborer (along with his brother Andrew) and was living with his family.

Edwin stood 5’7” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 27 years old and probably still living in Allegan County when he enlisted in E company, joining his older brother Andrew (who had enlisted in 1861), on August 9, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Leighton, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment on September 2 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, and was serving in the Quartermaster department from November of 1862 through February of 1863. In March he was on detached service, and in April was serving with the Brigade wagon and ambulance trains. He was working at Brigade headquarters from May of 1863 through July, and in August he was on detached service “outside of the department.”

Edwin was transferred to Company K, at Camp Bullock, Virginia in December of 1863 (joining his brother Andrew who had also been transferred to Company K as First Lieutenant and would soon be promoted to captain of the company.) Edwin was transferred as a Corporal to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was discharged on June 2, 1865, near Washington, DC.

Upon returning to Michigan in 1865 Edwin settled in Pentwater, Oceana County where he spent virtually his entire postwar life.

He married Illinois native Maria A. Carmichael (b. 1848) on December 24, 1873, and they had at least two children: Stella (b. 1875) and Nettie (b. 1878).

Elihu owned and operated a series of grist mills, planing mills and was involved in the lumber industry for many years. By 1880 he was working as a lumber dealer and living with his wife and two daughters in Pentwater. He also served as Supervisor of his Township and president of the village for three terms, as well as a member of the school board.

Edwin was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and in 1887 he applied for and received a pension (no. 836395).

He died at his home in Pentwater on October 15, 1909, and was buried in Pentwater cemetery: block 12, lot 208.

Wednesday, January 13, 2010

John Nicholas

John Nicholas was born in 1843 in Ohio, probably the son of John (b. 1813) and Susannah (b. 1817).

Maine or Vermont native John married New York-born Susannah and by 1840 had settled in Ohio. John (elder) eventually brought his family to Michigan from Ohio sometime between 1843 and 1846 and by 1850 had settled in Locke, Ingham County. In 1860 John was attending school with five of his younger siblings and living on the family farm in Locke.

John stood 5’9” with black eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was 21 years old and working as a farmer probably in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) He was reported missing on July 21, 1861, during the retreat from Bull Run, or on July 24, 1861 at Hunter’s farm, Virginia.

In fact, John had deserted, and apparently returned to Michigan where he may have reentered the service as a substitute for one William Duglish in Company B, Fourth Michigan cavalry on August 3, 1864, at Jackson, Jackson County for 3 years, crediting Locke, and was mustered the same day.

On August 12, 1864, R. L. Barry, the provost marshal at Jackson wrote to Lieutenant Colonel G. S. Horner, commanding the Draft Rendezvous in Jackson, that he had arrested Nicholas, believing he was a deserter from the Third infantry. “I have the honor,” he wrote, “to request for to deliver into the custody of my Special Agent H. Angell of Lansing, Mich. as sent to this office in the charge of an orderly private John Nicholas of the 4th Mich Inf [cavalry] who I am satisfactorily advised is a deserter from the 3d Mich Infty was at the time of his enlistment. I wish to investigate this case and to that end make the above request which I hope you will see attended to as soon as convenient.”

No further information is available regarding those allegations, and there is no “John Nicholas” listed in the Fourth Michigan infantry. However, according to the Fourth Michigan cavalry records, a John Nicholas enlisted as a Private in Company B, on August 3, 1864 and was mustered in the same day. He was mustered out of that Regiment on July 1, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee.

John eventually returned to Michigan after the war.

He married Michigan native Frances (b. 1849) and they had at least two children: Claude (b. 1873) and Clara (b. 1875).

By 1880 John was working as a farm hand and living with his wife and two children in Locke, Ingham County.

(“John Nicholas” who had served in the Fourth cavalry was living in Muir, Ionia County in 1894, and he received a pension, no. 973942.)

(There was another civil war veteran named John Nicholas living in Maple River, Emmet County in 1894.)

Curiously, in 1915 the Grand Army of the Republic reported that one John Nicholson, who had served as a private in Company A, Third Michigan infantry and who was a member of the GAR Wells Post No. 218 in Luther, Lake County, Michigan died at his home in Luther on December 13, 1914, and was preumably buried in Luther.

Tuesday, January 12, 2010

William H. Newton

William H. Newton was born in 1842 in Genesee County, Michigan.

William stood 5’11” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 20-year-old farmer possibly living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A on January 23, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Grand Rapids, and was mustered the same day. He reenlisted on February 4, 1864, at Camp Bullock, Virginia, near Culpeper, Virginia, was absent on veteran’s furlough in late February and/or early March. William returned to Michigan where married Lydia Jane Church on March 13, 1864, in Kent County.

He presumably returned to the Regiment in by the end of March or early April. He was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864.

William was a Corporal when he was killed in action on October 27, 1864, at Boydton Plank road (or Hatcher’s Run), near Petersburg, Virginia. William was presumably buried on the battlefield, and may be among the unknown soldiers interred at Petersburg, Virginia.

In 1865 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 44777).

Monday, January 11, 2010

Orin K. Newton

Orin K. Newton was born in 1844 in Lowell, Kent County, Michigan, the son of Charles (b. 1801) and Lucinda (b. 1801).

Massachusetts native Charles married New Yorker Lucinda sometime before 1834 probably in New York. His family moved to Michigan, probably from New York, sometime between 1834 and 1838, and by 1840 had probably settled in Kent County. By 1850 Orin was attending school with his older siblings and living with his family in Vergennes, Kent County, where his father owned and operated a large farm. In 1860 Orin was a farm laborer living with his mother and older brother Charles in Vergennes.

Orin stood 5’8” with gray eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 17 years old and probably still living with his family when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company K on May 13, 1861. He was shot in the left arm on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and subsequently sent to Columbian College hospital in Washington, DC, where he was reported to be doing well by early September. He may have been transferred to the hospital at Fort McHenry, Maryland, although he was discharged on November 17, 1862, at Washington, DC, for “a gunshot wound fracturing left humerus injuring brachial nerve, causing partial paralysis of the arm.”

It is not known if Orin returned to Michigan after he left the army.

In April of 1863 he applied for and received a pension (no. 16923).

He married Julia A.

By 1889 and 1890 Orin was living at 556 Herkimer in Brooklyn and working for a telephone company.

His widow was residing in New York in 1905 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 973763).

Sunday, January 10, 2010

Moses S. Newman

Moses S. Newman was born on January 1, 1821, probably in Lima, Livingston County, New York, the son of Joel (b. 1798) and Hannah (Lyon, b. 1794).

New Yorker Joel married Massachusetts native Hannah sometime before 1812 and settled in New York for some years. Joel brought his family from New York to Michigan sometime before 1830, eventually settling in Plymouth, Wayne County where Moses was living in 1834 and 1840.

Moses married Vermonter Charlotte Cook (b. 1825) and by 1850 they were living in Plymouth next door to Joel and Hannah. (In fact, Joel died in Plymouth.)

Moses was 43 years old and possibly a farmer living in Riley, Clinton County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company G on January 4, 1864, at Corunna, Shiawassee County for 3 years, crediting Riley, and was mustered on January 12. (He may have been related to Artemas Newman who was from Ingham County and had enlisted in Company G in 1861.)

Moses was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported in the Regimental Quartermaster department from December through February of 1865. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Moses returned to Michigan.

He married his second wife, Canadian woman named Rebecca (b. 1841).

By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his second wife in Hinton, Mecosta County. By 1880 he was working as a farm hand for the Nancy Myers family, and listed as a widower, in District 3, Dickson County, Tennessee. He apparently returned to Michigan and was possibly living in Dewitt in 1884 (Artemas Newman was living in Dewitt in 1890 and 1894).

In 1885 (?) Moses applied for and received a pension (no. 454828).

By 1890 he had returned to Dickson County, Tennessee.

He married his third wife, Harriet, and he may have been a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

His widow was residing in Tennessee when she applied for a pension (no. 682259), but the certificate was never granted.

Saturday, January 09, 2010

Artemas G. Newman

Artemas G. Newman was born on April 7, 1840, near Bath in Clinton County, Michigan, the son of Philemon (b. 1815) and Mary E. (1816-1874).

His parents moved to Michigan, probably from New York where they were both born, sometime before 1839, settling in Clinton County. By 1850 they were living in Phelpstown, Ingham County where Artemas attended school with his younger sister Corrina, but eventually moved on to Williamston, Ingham County while Artemas was still a young boy. By 1860 Artemas was working as a farm hand and living with his family in Williamston where his father owned a substantial farm.

Artemas stood 6’1” with blue eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 22 years old and probably still living in Ingham County when he enlisted as Fifth Corporal in Company G on May 10, 1861 -- he may have been related to Moses Newman who would enlist in Company G in 1864. (Company G, formerly the “Williams’ Rifles,” was made up predominantly of men from the Lansing area.)

Artemas was apparently a good friend of Charles Church, also of Company G and also from Williamston, and who frequently mentioned “Art” in his letters home.

Sometime in early August of 1861, according to Charles Church, Artemas was taken sick, but by August 24 Church wrote home that “Artemas is on the gain.” Yet, just barely two weeks later, on September 6 Charles wrote home that Art had “gone to Annapolis hospital, Maryland to recruit [recuperate] where all the soldiers go to get their health.” Indeed, the day before, Frank Siverd, also of Company G, wrote that Newman was at the convalescent hospital in Annapolis. In any event Art soon returned to the Regiment, and on September 19 Church wrote that “Artemas was returned to camp from Annapolis. He is getting quite smart.” And on November 26, Church noted that “Art is well and weighs over one hundred eighty pounds.”

By mid-fall the Third Michigan was encamped at Fort Lyon, Virginia, not far from Alexandria, and in late October Artemas and Charles were given a pass to go into Alexandria. “We have a good time generally,” Charles wrote home on October 27, “Art [Newman] & myself went to Alexandria last week. I think we enjoyed ourselves full as well as we ever did at Williamston.”

During the winter of 1861-62, the Third Michigan took up winter quarters at “Camp Michigan” near Alexandria, Virginia, and in a February letter to the Republican, Frank Siverd described the winter quarters of the non-commissioned officers of Company G, among whom were Charles Church and Art Newman, the “proprietors” of hut no. 6, the “‘Lansing House’.” “This,” wrote Siverd, “is an independent joint stock company, and the Lansing House of Camp Michigan is probably not much unlike the original Lansing House where Jipson finely entertained travelers in the woods bordering Grand River. It is built of logs eighteen by twenty feet -- was first covered with a dirt roof, but the sacred soil has such a propensity to become mortar that the roof only seemed to prolong the storm. It usually rained inside the house for three days after it quit outside, which induced them to put on a roof of hewn logs. The occupants of the Lansing House have an advantage over the rest of the company, as the officer of the day cannot see when the lights are extinguished, hence they retire when they please. They evidently live to eat in this institution. Go there when you will, night or day and you will find some person cooking and others eating.”

And two days after the Third Michigan broke camp and left their winter quarters, on March 19, 1862, Charles Church wrote home and scolded his sister for not writing more often. He pointed out to her that Art’s sister was an example to be followed. “Dear Sister, I should think you could write if Harriet Newman can. She writes to Art.”

In early March of 1862 the Army of the Potomac, under the command of General George B. McClellan, began moving toward the Virginia “peninsula,” in order to strike at Richmond. On March 17 the men of the Third Michigan were put aboard transports and sent to Fortress Monroe, Virginia, near Newport News and Norfolk. Charles Church wrote home on March 23 from the regiment’s camp near the fort that “Peach trees are in blossom here now. Oyster & clams are in abundance. Art & myself stroll along the shore and gather the oysters & have some great feasts.” By early summer of 1862 Artemas was reported as a Sergeant.

On August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, Artemas was shot in the right arm, resulting in the loss of the arm. Two days later Charles wrote home that “Art is tough and well.” Church wrote on September 4 that “Artemas lost his right arm in the last engagement and is now in the hospital,” and on September 19 that “Art is in Georgetown DC in the English Church Hospital.” As of early October he was in Presbyterian hospital in Georgetown, DC, and was still in Georgetown in late November. Artemas remained hospitalized until he was discharged for disability on December 3, 1862 at Newark, New Jersey.

Artemas listed Williamston as his mailing address on his discharge paper, and following his return home he probably entered into some mercantile enterprise.

Shortly after Newman was discharged from the army as a result of disability, Church wrote home on February 1, 1863, complaining that “Art wrote [Charles] Price of our company and I do not see why he has not written to me but still I send my best respects to him as a soldier.” Charles Church of Company G wrote on March 30, 1863, that he was “glad to hear that Artemas is going to try his luck at selling articles. Success to a wounded soldier and a liberal patronage.”

Shortly after the war, sometime in early 1866, numerous residents of Williamston wrote the Pension Bureau informing the commissioners that Artemas had “shown himself disloyal to his governmen by publicly expressing himself in favor of the so-called Southern Confederacy & sympathetic with the late rebellion. . . .” It is unknown what if any response Artemas made to these rather serious accusations.

He married New York native Jane A. (b. 1844), and they had at least three children: Jennie (b. 1864), Josephine B. (d. 1876) and Hobart W. (d. 1872).

By 1870 he was working as a farmer (his two brothers also lived near by) and living with his wife and daughter in Williamston. He was still living in Williamston in 1880 with his wife and two daughters, and in 1883 when he was drawing $24.00 per month in 1883 for loss of his right arm (pension no. 79,283, dated May of 1867). By 1890 and 1894 he was residing in Dewitt, Clinton County (Moses Newman was living in Dewitt in 1884).

Artemas lived in Ingham County for many years. Art may have been a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. he was a member of Grand Army of the Republic George W. Anderson Post No. 58 in Dewitt and in April of 1900 he joined the Grand Army of the Republic Charles Foster Post No. 42 in Lansing, and was suspended in December of 1904. He was dropped from the post in November of the following year.

After having been confined to his bed for some three months, Artemas died of “stomach trouble” on February 28, 1908, in Lansing and was buried in Summit cemetery, Williamston.

Friday, January 08, 2010

James Finchout Newland

James Finchout Newland was born on August 20, 1839, in Saratoga Springs, Saratoga County, New York.

James left New York and had settled in western Michigan by 1860 when he was a farm laborer working for and/or living with the Carren family in Berlin (Saranac), Ionia County.

He stood 6’0” with blue eyes, dark brown hair and a light complexion and was 21 years old and probably still living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) He was wounded at New Market Crossroads and at Malvern Hill, Virginia, on June 30 and July 1, 1862, respectively. He soon rejoined the Regiment, however, and was reported as a company cook in August of 1862.

James was a Corporal in January of 1863 when he was transferred, possibly as a Private, to Battery K, Third United States artillery at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, on January 18, 1863, to serve out the balance of his term of enlistment. He reenlisted on February 8, 1864, at Rappahannock Station, Virginia in the same battery, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough for 30 days and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first week of March. He was appointed Corporal on October 27, promoted to Sergeant on April 1, 1865, and was mustered out as a Sergeant on February 8, 1866, at Fort Warren in Boston harbor, Massachusetts.

After his discharge from the army James remained in Boston where he married Irish-born Mary Monaghan (1846-1910) on May 31, 1866, and they had at least nine children: John J. (1867-70), Mary Ann (1871-1888), Charles J. (1872-1956), Margaret Eliza (1874-1890), Daniel M. (1876-1876), Martha (1877-1928), Elias J. (1879-1905), Susan Caroline (1886-1974) and James F. (1888-89). According to one source, Mary had been the cook for the commander of Fort Warren.

James eventually moved to Brooklyn, New York, where he lived the remainder of his life, and for many years worked as a conductor on the New York transit system. In the spring of 1873 James was residing at 715 Flushing Avenue, suffering from deafness in both ears (possibly as a consequence of his service in the artillery), and in 1880 he was working as a “car conductor’ and living on Twenty-fourth Street in Brooklyn with his wife and children. In July of 1892 he was living at 52 Delmonico Street in Brooklyn. By 1902 and 1903 he was living at 985 Myrtle Avenue. He was residing at 884 Myrtle Avenue in April of 1904, April of 1907, August of 1909 and in 1912, and he worked as a conductor on the street railway system in Brooklyn in 1902 and 1904.

In 1892 he applied for and received a pension (no. 1,056,334), increased from $12.00 to $15.00 per month in 1909.

James was probably a widower when he died at his home in Brooklyn at 6:00 a.m. on December 17, 1912, and was presumably buried in Brooklyn.

Thursday, January 07, 2010

Edward New

Edward New was born in 1840 in Baden, Germany.

Edward immigrated to America sometime before 1863, eventually settling in Michigan.

He stood 5’6” with gray eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a 23-year-old clerk possibly living in Baltimore, Maryland when he became a substitute for Henry Bitner, who had been drafted on February 17, 1863, for 9 months from Erin, Macomb County. Edward subsequently enlisted in Unassigned on March 3, 1863, at Erin for 3 years, crediting Erin, and was sent to the Regiment on March 6.

There is no further record. No pension seems to be available.

(There was one Edward New or Nau who enlisted as a Private on August 21, 1864, in Battery G, Sixth Pennsylvania Heavy Artillery, and was mustered in the same day. He was mustered out on June 13, 1865, at Fort Ethan Allen, Virginia. This particular Edward New was married to one Catherine and was living in Pennsylvania when he applied for and received a pension (no. 873473). He was probably still living in Pennsylvania when he died, probably in 1901. In any case his widow was living in Pennsylvania in August of 1901 when she applied for and received a pension no. 546824.)

Monday, January 04, 2010

Benjamin M., John A. and William W. Nestel

Benjamin M. Nestel, alias “Benjamin Radford,”was born in 1843 in New York, the son of George (1818-1888) and Abigail (Radford, 1820-1889).

New York natives George and Abigail were probably married in New York sometime before 1838. George moved his family from New York to Michigan sometime after 1853. By 1860 Benjamin was probably working as a farm laborer in Kent County.

Benjamin was 18 years old (and probably unable to read or write) when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company F on May 13, 1861, along with his brothers John and William, and all three men were transferred to Company C before the Regiment left for Washington on June 13, 1861. Benjamin was reported sick in his quarters on February 28, 1862.

Benjamin reportedly deserted from the Regiment on August 24, 1862.

He was tried and convicted on September 24, 1862, for having deserted from August 24, 1862, and remaining absent until September 22, and for violation of the 52nd Article of War, that is, for having intentionally thrown away his gun and ammunition, and for violation of the 21st Article of War, being absent from his command without leave. He pled guilty to all charges and was sentenced on September 30 to “forfeit all pay and allowance which are or may hereafter be due him; to be indelibly branded on the left hip with the letter D -- one and one-half inches long; to have his head shaved, and to be drummed out of the service.”

The sentence was executed in the presence of the entire Third Brigade on Friday, October 3. According to George Waldron of the fifth Michigan Infantry and a regular correspondent to the Detroit Advertiser and Tribune,

several regiments of Berry’s Brigade (excepting the 5th Michigan that being on picket) were drawn up in two parallels with an intervening space of about 3 rods, to witness the execution of the sentence of a court martial upon a private in Co. C of the 3d Michigan, for desertion and throwing away his gun and cartridge box, these being the principal charges and the sentence was that the deserter (I withhold his name out of respect to his friends) should have his head shaved and be branded with the letter D on his left hip, and be drummed out of camp all of which was duly executed under the supervision of a Lieutenant of the Provost Guard/ The deserter was marched down the lines in full view of all, under a guard of six soldiers, with four fifers and six drummers, playing the “Rogue’s March,” and thence to the top of a hill a few rods in front, where the whole Brigade had a full view of the execution of the sentence, after which the subject of this sentence was marched back again, with head uncovered. the band playing the same tune and the guard in the rear with arms in the position of charge bayonets, after which he was left to go withersoever he would. The sentence also deprived him of all back pay, which was considerable, being about five months. I am informed this loss was made up to him by the generosity of the 2d and 3d Michigan and 37th New York, his own company presenting him $50, and the above regiments increasing the amount to $390. There was so little dissatisfaction in his company and regiment on account of, as is said, the injustice of the sentence, which I have not taken the trouble to investigate, being satisfied for the present with the verdict of a Court Martial.

The desertion was since the Army of the Potomac returned from the Peninsula, and while the regiment to which the deserter belonged was marching from Alexandria toward Bull Run [Groveton]. On his trial he had every opportunity and assistance offered him to produce proof of his innocence.


This is the first time such a sentence has every been executed in Berry’s Brigade and I think it will be the last for it will have such a decided effect upon the men that desertion henceforth will be unknown in this Brigade. Let those who are absent without leave at their homes in Michigan and elsewhere take warning by this terrible example and hasten to their regiments.

According to Edgar Clark of Company G, who witnessed the affair, “[i]t was a hard-looking sight.” Nestle’s “head was shaved in sight of the whole camp and then was marched right in front and six drums played the tune called the ‘Rogue’s March’.” Clark added that he “never wanted to see another such sight. I would rather be shot and buried five feet underground than be disgraced in that way.”

Curiously, George Waldron wrote that Benjamin had, in fact, quite a bit of sympathy in his own regiment.

The deserter was marched down the lines in full view of all, under a guard of six soldiers, with four fifers and six drummers, playing the “Rogue’s March,” and thence to the top of a hill a few rods in front, where the whole brigade had full view of the execution of the sentence, after which the subject of this sentence was marched back again with head uncovered, the band playing the same tune and the guard in the rear with arms in the position of charge bayonets, after which he was left to do whatsoever he would. The sentence deprived him of all back pay, which was considerable being about five months. I am informed this loss was made up to him by the generosity off the 2d and 3d Michigan and the 37th New York, his own company presenting him $50, and the above regiments increasing to $300. There was some little dissatisfaction in his company and regiment on account of, as I said, the injustice of the sentence. . . .

After his discharge Benjamin reportedly enlisted in the U.S. Navy at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, in December of 1862, under the name of Benjamin Radford (his mother’s maiden name). He served for some nine years altogether, for about two years aboard the USS Franklin (which he joined at New York City), and when the Franklin was de-commissioned he was transferred to the USS Wabash. Benjamin left the Wabash at Key West, shipped aboard the USS Powahtan for New York City where he was put aboard the Minnesota.

He was discharged from the Navy on July 6, 1877, and eventually returned to Michigan, settling in St. Louis, Gratiot County, where he was living in 1890, in Pine River in 1894 and in St. Louis in 1907.

He married Elizabeth Ann Myers in Gratiot County on July 5 (?), 1878, and they had at least two children: Wallace Waldrow (b. 1880) and Perley (?) May (1884-1902).

Benjamin was living in Pine River, Gratiot County in 1890 and 1894, apparently with his cousin (or brother) William, and worked most of his life as a laborer.

Benjamin applied for and received a pension (no. 841931).

He may be buried in an unmarked grave (which has a flag on it) in the family plot in Oak Grove cemetery in St. Louis, Gratiot County: section G no. 37.

John A. Nestel was born in 1842 in Cayuga County, New York, the son of George (1818-1888) and Abigail (Radford, 1820-1889).

Both New York natives, George and Abigail were probably married in New York sometime before 1838. George moved his family from New York to Michigan sometime after 1853, and by 1860 John was working as a farm laborer (as was his older brother William who would also enlist in the Third Michigan) and living with his family in Grand Rapids Township, where his father, who could not read or write, worked as a farmer.

He stood 5’10” with brown eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 19 years old and residing in Grand Rapids when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company F on May 13, 1861, along with his brothers William and Benjamin. All three men were transferred to Company C before the Regiment left for Washington on June 13, 1861. John was wounded in the right side of the head on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia, and admitted on May 6 to Lincoln hospital in Washington, DC, where he was treated for a gunshot wound to the right ear. He was sick in the hospital in June, a provost guard in Washington during July and sick in the hospital through August.

John returned to duty on September 8, and reenlisted on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids. He probably returned home to Michigan on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, and rejoined the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was wounded again, this time severely in one of his hands and taken prisoner during the Wilderness campaign of early May, 1864, probably on May 6. On May 19 he was admitted to the prison hospital in Richmond, suffering from dysentery. He was probably still absent as a prisoner-of-war (or at the very least absent sick) when he was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent” sick or wounded” through March of 1865. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana

After the war John returned to Michigan.

He was married to Michigan native Martha (b. 1847) and they had at least four children: Eva (b. 1867), William W. (b. 1873), Thomas (b. 1874) and Kittie (b.. 1877).

By 1880 John was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Pine River, Gratiot County; his parents as well as his brother William were also living in Pine River that year. John was probably working as a farmer in Cedar Springs, Kent County in 1884. He was living in Houghton Lake, Roscommon County in 1888, 1890 and in 1894.

In 1885 John applied for and received a pension (no. 335967).

John was possibly a widower when he died on March 15, 1921, in Clare, Michigan and was presumably buried there.

William Wallace was born in 1838 in Cayuga County, New York, the son of George (1818-1888) and Abigail (Radford, 1820-1889).

Both New York natives, George and Abigail were probably married in New York sometime before 1838. George moved his family from New York to Michigan sometime after 1853, and by 1860 William was working as a farm laborer (as was his younger brother John who would also enlist in the Third Michigan) and living with his family in Grand Rapids Township, where his father, who could not read or write, worked as a farmer.

William (or "Wallace W.") stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 23 years old and residing in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861, along with his brothers John and Benjamin. All three men were transferred to Company C before the Regiment left for Washington on June 13, 1861.

William was reported absent sick in the Regimental hospital, probably in the summer of 1861, as AWOL in August through September of 1862, and allegedly deserted on October 23, 1862 at Edward’s Ferry, Maryland. This occurred at the same time that Benjamin was reported AWOL and who was eventually court-martialed and dismissed from the service. William had in fact been sent to the hospital on August 27, 1862, and was discharged for disability on January 10, 1863, at Fort Hamilton in New York harbor.

He may have reentered the service in I battery, Second New York artillery on September 2, 1862. If so, he received a gunshot wound to the right leg and was discharged on May 18, 1865.

In any case, William eventually returned to Michigan. By 1870 he was working on his father’s farm and living with his parents in Alma, Pine River Township, Gratiot County, and he was still living with his parents in 1880 in Pine River. He was living in Pine River, Gratiot County in 1888, 1890 and in 1890 along with Benjamin.

He was a member of Grand Army of the Republic Wilkins Post No. 91 in St. Louis, Pine River Township, Gratiot County.

In 1870 he applied for and received a pension (no. 834513).

William died on December 13, 1915, probably in Pine River and was buried in Oak Grove cemetery in St. Louis (as was Benjamin): section G no. 31.

Sunday, January 03, 2010

John Nelthorpe Jr.

John Nelthorpe Jr. was born in 1831 in Norfolk, England, the son of John Sr.

John left England and immigrated to America, eventually settling in western Michigan. (In 1860 there was one Walter Nelthorp, age 26 and born in England, working as a miller and living in Grand Rapids First Ward with his wife Margaret. Walter and Margaret had been married in 1858 in Grand Rapids.)

John married Scotland-born Jane B. Sligh (1823-1905), and they had at least four children: Ida (b. 1857), Frank W. (b. 1859), Hattie (b. 1863) and Fred H. (b. 1869). Jane was the sister to Robert Sligh who also served in Company K, Third Michigan infantry during the war (Robert perished at Gettysburg).

John stood 5’9” with gray eyes, fair hair and a fair complexion and was a 31-year-old farmer possibly living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company K on August 2, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Grand Rapids. He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, and was sick in Summit House hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, from at least mid-July of 1863, probably until he was discharged on September 19, 1863, at Summit house hospital, suffering from consumption of the left lung.

He listed Grand Rapids as his mailing address on his discharge paper, and in 1870 he was working as a stone mason and living with his his wife and children in the Third Ward; he eventually moved to Ottawa County. In 1880 John was working as a mason and living with his family in Nunica, Ottawa County; he was still in Nunica in 1888, and he was living in Crockery, Ottawa County in 1890 and in Nunica and in 1895.

John was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association., and in 1895 he applied for and received a pension (no. 357691).

John probably died around 1900, presumably died in Nunica and was buried in Crockery cemetery.

His widow applied for a pension (application no. 716187), but the certificate was apparently never granted. Jane was listed as his widow in 1900 and living with her son Fred and his family in Crockery; she died in Nunica in late 1905. Jane apparently never applied for a pension.

Saturday, January 02, 2010

Charles Nelson

Charles Nelson was born in 1842 in Canada.

His family probably moved from Canada to Ohio (where his sister Harriet was born in 1849), then on to Michigan sometime after 1849. By 1860 Charles was a boiler maker living with his sister Harriet and the Dr. Adua Sherman family in Tallmadge, Ottawa County. (Sherman had himself been born in Canada in 1823 and his wife Lydia born in Ohio in 1833; their daughter Abbie was born in Canada in 1853.)

Charles stood 5’5” with black eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was 19 years old and probably still living in Tallmadge when he enlisted with his parents’ or guardian’s consent in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) He received the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863, and was wounded on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. He was subsequently hospitalized through November, but eventually recovered and returned to duty. Charles reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Solon, Kent County, was presumably on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, probably in Michigan, and probably rejoined the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was wounded severely in the leg and taken prisoner on May 6, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia, and was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was reported as a prisoner through November, and it is possible that he died in prison.

There is no further record, and no pension seems to be available.

(There is a pension reported for one Charles W. Nelson, who served in Company E (?), Thirty-fourth Michigan infantry – although in fact there was no 34th Michigan infantry or cavalry. It is possible that this was the Third Michigan Charles Nelson. In any case, he was living in Canada when he applied for a pension, no. 1693708.)

Friday, January 01, 2010

Philip Neitz

Philip Neitz was born on May 19, 1823, in Union County, Pennsylvania.

In 1830 there was one Philip Neitz living in Chapman, Union County, Pennsylvania; and in 1850 there was a Philip Neitz, age 12, living with his father Samuel in Washington, Union County, Pennsylvania.

In any case, Philip was married to Pennsylvania native Elizabeth (b. 1825), probably in Pennsylvania, and they had at least five children: Fanny (b. 1848), Lucetta (b. 1850), Lena Ann (b. 1853), William (b. 1855) and Philip (b. 1858). They moved from Pennsylvania to Ohio probably before 1848 and on to Michigan probably in 1855, eventually settling in Portland, Ionia County in 1857. By 1860 Philip was working as a mason and farm laborer and living with his wife and children in Portland.

He tood 5’8” with gray eyes, dark hair and a light complexion and was 28 years old and probably still living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was discharged for hemorrhoids on September 25, 1862, at Fort McHenry, Maryland.

After he left the army Philip returned to Portland where he reentered the service in Company B, Tenth Michigan cavalry on October 1, 1863, for 3 years, crediting Portland, and was mustered on October 14 at Grand Rapids where the regiment was organized between September 18 and November 18, 1863, when it was mustered into service. It left Michigan for Lexington, Kentucky on December 1, 1863, and participated in numerous operations, mostly in Kentucky and Tennessee throughout the winter of 1863-64. Most of its primary area of operations would eventually be in the vicinity of Strawberry Plains, Tennessee. He was on detached service in Kentucky in November of 1864 and was mustered out with the regiment on November 11, 1865, at Memphis, Tennessee.

Philip returned to Portland where he probably lived out the remainder of his life. In 1870 he was working as a stone mason and living with his wife and two children in Portland. By 1880 he was still working as a mason and living in Portland with his wife and daughter Lena and her son; also living in Portland was W. W. Neitz, who was possibly his son William. In 1890 he was suffering from “spinal neuralgia,” and was apparently totally blind the last few years of his life.

In 1876 he applied for and received a pension (no. 312477).

Philip died in Portland on Wednesday October 19, 1892,and the funeral was held on Friday October 21.

On October 27, the Ionia Sentinel wrote in part that Neitz “was somewhat of a character in his way. When he first came [to Portland] he was addicted to the use of spirituous liquors, but for which he might have died a rich man. He was possessed of rather more than ordinary talent, and during the period of total abstinence, some years, ago, delivered quite a number of effective lectures on temperance, always carrying the interested audience with him. His greatest weakness was that he was unable to withstand the arts of the saloon men, who thought it especially nice to get him intoxicated.”

He was buried in Portland cemetery: W-22-os.

In April of 1893 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 406516).