Friday, July 30, 2010

George Shadduck

George Shadduck was born in 1833 in New York, the son of Asa (b. 1809) and Aramintha (Rounds, b. 1815).

Asa was born in New Hampshire and married Massachusetts or New York native Aramintha sometime before 1833, probably in New York where they lived for some years before moving west. George’s family came to Michigan sometime between 1840 and 1850 when George was working as a laborer, attending school with his younger siblings and living with his family in Courtland, Kent County. By 1860 George was a farmer still living with his family in Courtland in 1860. (He may have been the nephew of Joseph Rounds Sr. and cousin of Joseph Rounds Jr. both of whom would enlist in Companies F and G respectively.)

George was 28 years old and probably still living in Courtland when he enlisted in Company C on May 23, 1861. He was probably wounded in the arm on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and by mid-July he was in Stewart’s Mansion hospital in Baltimore, serving as a nurse, and was reported by one observer to be “in fair health.” George remained hospitalized from July of 1862 through August, but soon returned to the Regiment where he was reported as a company cook in September and October of 1862.

He was a witness for the defense in the court martial of James Ayres, who was absent without leave for two days from the regiment during the battle of Chancellorsville.

He was shot in the right leg on November 30, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia, the “ball entering on minor side 1 inch above ankle, extracted same place,” and admitted from the field on December 4 to the Second Division hospital at Alexandria, Virginia. He remained absent sick in the hospital until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit at Second Division hospital.

After he was discharged from the army George eventually returned to western Michigan. In September of 1869 he married New York native Mrs. Phebe Teft (b. 1833), and by 1870 George was working as a farmer and living with his wife and her two daughters: Marilla Teft (b. 1863) and Marty Teft (b. 1866) in Courtland, Kent County.

Sometime between mid-1870 and 1880 he married his second wife, New York native Martha Watson Tracy (1834-1892), and they had at least one and possibly two children: Charles (b. 1870) and Leroy (b. 1879). In any case, by 1880 George was working as a farmer and living with his wife Martha and two children on his parent’s farm in Courtland.

George was living in Cedar Springs, Kent County in 1881 and in 1883 when he was drawing $2.00 per month for a wound to the right leg (pension no. 205,205), but by 1888 he was residing in Muskegon, Muskegon County. Two years later he was living in Egleston, Algoma Township, Kent County and in Lowell, Kent County in 1894; he may also have lived at one time in Rockford, Kent County.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association as well as Grand Army of the Republic Jewell post no. 62 in Cedar Springs.

George was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 2751) on December 15, 1896, discharged on April 3, 1897, then readmitted on August 8, 1907, and discharged on July 30, 1908. He was admitted for the final time on February 11, 1909.

George was a widower when he died of “senility” at 7:10 a.m. on February 16, 1909, in the Home hospital. His remains were buried in Courtland cemetery.

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Edward Seeland

Edward Seeland was born on June 7, 1840, in Prussia.

Edward immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan by the time the war broke out.

He stood 5’8’ with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old carpenter probably living in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for chronic rheumatism and mumps on December 16, 1861, at Camp Michigan, Virginia.

After he was discharged from the army Edward subsequently returned to Grand Rapids where he reentered the service in Company B, First Michigan Engineers and Mechanics, on December 17, 1863, for 3 years, crediting Grand Rapids’ Second Ward, and was mustered on January 2, 1864. Edward probably joined the regiment somewhere in the vicinity of Chattanooga, Tennesse where it was on engineering duty as well as at Bridgeport, Stevenson and on line of the Nashville & Chattanooga Railroad, Nashville & Northwestern Railroad, Tennessee & Alabama Railroad and Memphis & Charleston Railroad building block houses, etc., till May, 1864. The Regiment was on duty on the Atlantic & Western Railroad building block houses, etc., till September when it was ordered to Atlanta, Ga., September 25. Old members were mustered out October 31, 1864.

It remained on duty at Atlanta September 28 to November 15; and participated in the March to the sea destroying railroad track, bridges and repairing and making roads November 15-December 10; in the siege of Savannah December 10-21, in the Carolina Campaign January to April, 1865; in the advance on Raleigh April 10-14, and occupation of Raleigh April 14; in the surrender of Johnston and his army. The regiment then marched to Washington, D. C., via Richmond, Va., April 29-May 20, and was in the Grand Review on May 24. Ordered to Louisville, Ky., June 6; then to Nashville, Tenn. Duty at Nashville July 1 to September 22.

Edward was promoted to Artificer on August 1, 1865, and was mustered out with the regiment on September 22, 1865, at Nashville, Tennessee. The regiment was discharged at Jackson, Jackson County, Michigan on October 1.

Edward again returned to Grand Rapids where for many years he worked as a carpenter.

He married Anna B. Stach on January 22, 1872, and divorced from her on October 18, 1907; they had eleven children: Annie or Lillie (b. 1877), Fred (b. 1885), Carl (b. 1887), Chancey (b. 1890), Mabel (b. 1892) and Roy (b. 1894); and five who died in infancy.

He was a devout Protestant and by 1912 was a minister of the gospel. In 1880 he applied for and received pension no. 428,140.

At some point Edward lived in Washington, DC, and was living in South Hannibal, Missouri in 1880 and 1882. He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 3887) for the first time on September 9, 1902, and discharged at his own request on June 14, 1904, readmitted on June 19, 1905, and discharged May 28, 1906. Following a second readmission he was dropped on June 20, 1908, and in 1912 he was living in St. Louis, Missouri. He also lived in Salt Lake city, Utah and at 2148 Curtis Street in Denver, Colorado in 1915.

He was living in Chicago, Illinois, when he died of heart disease on July 24, 1917, probably at his home at 301 Aberdeen Street in Chicago and was buried on July 27 in Elmwood cemetery in Chicago.

Wednesday, July 28, 2010

Frederick Scriver

Frederick Scriver was born in 1837.

Frederick was 24 years old and possibly living in Big Rapids, Mecosta County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. On November 15 Fred was admitted to Kalorama hospital (for “eruptive” diseases such as smallpox) in Washington, DC, and in July of 1862 he was reported as a nurse in Kalorama, but soon returned to the Regiment.

He was killed in action on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and presumably among the unknown soldiers whose remains were removed from Second Bull Run and reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.

There seems to be no pension available.

Tuesday, July 27, 2010

James L. Scribner

James L. Scribner was born on May 18, 1827, in New York City, New York, the son of James (1801-1861) and Eliza (Slocum, 1803-1898).

His family moved to Michigan sometime before 1837, perhaps as early as 1835 and reportedly built the first bridge across the Grand River connecting the east and west sides of Grand Rapids; Scribner Street on the west side was named after him. By 1850 James L. (listed as John L.) was working as a sailor and living with his family in Grand Rapids, Kent County, where his father worked as a land dealer. In 1859-60 he was working for his father who was president of the Grand Rapids Salt Manufacturing co., with his office located at the southwest corner of Bridge and Water Streets, and James (younger) was living with his family at 31 Turner between First and Second Streets on the west side of the Grand River. In 1860 James L. was a salt manufacturer living in Grand Rapids, Fourth Ward

James L. was 34 years old and probably still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. (Company B was made up largely of men from Grand Rapids, many form the west side of the river, and many of whom had served in various local militia units before the war, in particular the Grand Rapids Artillery, under Captain Baker Borden, who would also command Company B.)

He was taken prisoner on July 1, 1862, at White Oak Swamp, Virginia, confined briefly at Libby and Belle Isle prisons. It is possible that James was parole don August 5. On August 6 the Richmond Dispatch reported that at

About 1 o’clock yesterday three thousand of the Federal prisoners on Belle Island left the city for “Varina,” (the farm of Albert Aiken, Esq., twelve miles from Richmond,) a guide having been procured from Capt. Alexander’s detective force to pilot them thither. They went under flag of truce to be exchanged, and were to be met by officers of the United States Army, empowered to effect that object. The party consisted wholly of soldiers, no commissioned officers being in the party. The guard attending the party was composed of a portion of the 42d Mississippi regiment, under Col. Miller. The prisoners were permitted to go by the C. S. Military Prison, and while in front of the building they cheered their imprisoned compatriots, (Generals and other officers,) and otherwise testified their respect for them. They appeared elated at the prospect of going home. The day was intensely hot, and it was intimated, after they had been gone for some hours, that many of them broke down, and had to be left on the way-side, while two or three died. There are 1,700 Yankees yet to go.

James may have been with that very detachment. In any case he was reportedly returned to the Regiment on August 6 at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

James was detached as an ambulance driver from August of 1862 through April of 1863, and was wounded in both shoulders on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia. According to David Northrup of Company B, during the action of May 3 although “there were none killed in our Co some [were] wounded slightly. James Scribner was wounded the worst.” He was subsequently absent wounded through May of 1864, and was reportedly transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps.

James eventually returned to Grand Rapids where he was living in 1867-69 working as a clerk for Congdon & Hill and living on the corner of Monroe and Division, and in fact he worked for many years as a clerk.

He was married to Mary Louise Snively (nee Waters, b. 1832) on January 29, 1868, in Grand Rapids. By 1870 he was working as a clerk in an office and living with his wife and her three children by a previous marriage. (By 1880 his mother and several siblings were living in Grand Rapids’ Seventh Ward.)

By 1883 James was living in Clarion, Charlevoix County, but by 1888 he had moved back to Grand Rapids, boarding at 18 W. Bridge in 1889, in Grand Rapids in 1890 and in the Eighth Ward in 1894. (His mother was a widow living at 257 E. Fulton in Grand Rapids in 1889 and 1890.)

James died a widower of Bright’s disease on October 17, 1901, at his sister’s home at 99 Broadway in Grand Rapids, and was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section O lot 70.

Monday, July 26, 2010

George P. Scranton

George P. Scranton was born in 1843 or 1845 in Romeo, Macomb County, Michigan, probably the son of Dennis (b. 1799) and Eliza Delia or “Detin” (Palmer, b. 1808).

New York natives Dennis and Eliza were married in 1829 in Macomb County, Michigan and by 1840 Dennis was living in Washington, Macomb County. In 1850 Dennis was working as a wagon-maker in Washington, Macomb County and George was residing at home with his family. In 1860 one George W. Scranton residing in Grattan, Kent County. (Albert H. Scranton was also living in Grattan in 1862; he too would join Company E.)

George stood 5’6” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 16-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company E on May 13, 1861.

George was shot in the right leg and reported missing in action in early September, when in fact he had been taken prisoner on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and was held briefly. He soon returned to the Regiment on September 28 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, was absent in the hospital from September through December, absent on leave in January of 1863, and he remained on leave until he was discharged as a Corporal on May 2, 1863, at Detroit.

George listed Romeo, Macomb County as his mailing address on his discharge paper. Apparently he did return to Michigan where he reentered the service in the Second Regiment Veterans’ Reserve Corps on September 13, 1864, at Pontiac, Oakland County for 3 years, and probably never left Michigan. He was discharged on November 14, 1864, from Company B, VRC, at Jackson, Jackson County.

After the war George remained in Michigan.

He was married to New york native Anna (b. 1857) and they had at least two children: Daisy D. (b. 1877) and Ismond (b. 1879).

By 1880 he was working as a “station agent” (presumably for a railroad) and living with his wife and children in Charlotte’s Fourth Ward, Eaton County. He was living in Charlotte in 1883 when he was drawing $4.00 per month for a wounded right leg (pension no. 19,253, dated 1863), but by 1890 he was living in Lansing, Second Ward. He was residing in Lansing’s Third ward in 1894, and was working as a railroad agent in Lansing in June of 1900 when he joined the Grand Army of the Republic Foster post no. 42 in Lansing; he was also a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry association. George was suspended from the Foster post in June of 1903 and dropped in December of 1904.

George reportedly died on January 15, 1907, presumably in Lansing and was probably buried there.

In February of 1907 (?) his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 632790).

Sunday, July 25, 2010

Albert Hough Scranton

Albert Hough Scranton was born on May 26, 1846, in Concord, Jackson County, Michigan, the son of Elnathan (b. 1783) and Louisa (b. 1809).

New York native Elnathan, who had served as a Lieutenant in a New York militia regiment during the War of 1812, eventually left New York and moved westward, settling in Michigan. He was probably living in Jackson County by 1805 when he married his first wife, Lucretia Andrews, in Concord and he resided in Concord for many years. He married his second wife, Rebecca Hough in 1818, also in Concord, Jackson County, and his third wife, New York native Louisa in 1836, also in Concord. By 1850 Albert was attending school and living with his family in Grattan, Kent County.

Albert was 16 years old and living in Grattan, Kent County, Michigan when he enlisted in Company H, Twenty-first Michigan infantry, on August 7 or September 4, 1862. He was discharged for disability on December 21, 1862, in Louisville, Kentucky. He subsequently served in the Veteran’s Reserve Corps.

He returned to Michigan and stood 5’9” with black eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company E, Third Michigan infantry on January 18, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (He was possibly related to George Scranton who also enlisted in Company E.)

Albert joined the Regiment on February 10, was wounded on May 5 at the Wilderness, Virginia, and subsequently absent sick in the hospital in May of 1864. He was still hospitalized when he was transferred to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick until he was mustered out, presumably on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Albert returned to Michigan.

He was married to Michigan native Sarah J. (b. 1847) and they had at least three children: Mary Lula (b. 1869), Bertha B. (b. 1871) and Frances G. (b. 1877). They were still living in Michigan in 1869 but soon moved to Kansa and by 1870 Albert was working as a merchant and living with his wife and family in Centropolis, Franklin County, Kansas. They were still in Kansas in 1871.

Albert was living in Grand Rapids in 1875 and still in Michigan in 1877, but by 1880 was working as an agent for a sewing machine company and living with his wife and children in Medina village, Medina County, Ohio. By the turn of the century was residing at 4017 Wabash Avenue in Chicago, Illinois.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

In 1871 he applied for and eventually received a pension (no. 133896).

Albert probably died in late 1908 or early 1909.

In February of 1909 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 677903). Sarah was probably living with her daughter Lula and her husband Edmund Blair in Chicago in 1920.

Saturday, July 24, 2010

Rufus B. Scoville

Rufus B. Scoville was born around 1833 in Albany, Rensselaer County, New York.

Rufus settled in western Michigan where by 1860 he was working as a dentist and living in Grand Rapids’ First Ward; also living in the First Ward was a printer John S. Scoville, and his family. John, too, would join the Third Michigan.

Rufus stood 5’4” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 28 years old and probably still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A, possibly at the same time that John Scoville enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. Rufus was discharged for consumption on October 2, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia.

He apparently returned to Michigan, possibly to Detroit where he may have been residing in mid-November of 1861, when he took the Oath of Identity in his application for a pension. However, his pension -- which had been filed on November 29, 1861 (no. 159), was abandoned sometime after early 1862. In any case, there is no further record.

It seems that Rufus reentered the service on February 1, 1864, as a private, age 32, at Weesaw (?), Michigan, in Company A, Sixth Michigan infantry and was mustered in on February 4, 1864. (The Sixth Michigan infantry was officially converted into a heavy artillery unit in July of 1863, and was thus subsequently known as the Sixth Michigan Heavy Artillery.)

The regiment re-assembled at its former camp at Kalamazoo after the expiration of the thirty days furlough and returned to Port Hudson, where it arrived May 11. The Sixth moved to Vicksburg, Mississippi, where it served as engineers, and then moved to White River and soon after to Ashton, Arkansas. The regiment was divided into detachments to serve as heavy artillery and was stationed at Fort Morgan, Fort Gaines, Dauphin Island, and Mobile Bay, in Alabama.

The regiment received orders to return to Michigan, and it arrived at Jackson on August 30, 1865, and was paid off and discharged September 5, 1865.

Rufus reportedly died of disease on November 19, 1864, in New Orleans and was presumably buried there.

Thursday, July 22, 2010

John S. Scoville

John S. Scoville was born around 1833 in Albany, Rensselaer County, New York, probably the son of John Brigham (b. 1808) and Jane (Stillwell).

Massachusetts native John B. eventually left New York and moved his family to Michigan and was probably the same John B. “Scovil” who was working as a physician, and who apparently remarried to Michigan-born Rebecca B. (b. 1821). By 1850 John S. was working as a printer along with his older brother Harry and they were living with their family in Detroit.

John S. probably returned to New York where he married New York native Elizabeth (b. 1839) in New York, and they had at least four children: Charles C. (b. 1858), Winifred (b. 1859), Irene (b. 1859) and Lizzie.

John S. moved back to Michigan with his own family sometime before 1858 and by 1860 he was working as a printer and living at the corner of Summit and William Streets with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ First Ward. Also living in the First Ward was Rufus B. Scoville, a dentist, and probably John’s brother or cousin. Rufus too would join the Third Michigan infantry.

John stood 5’4” with light eyes and hair and a light complexion and was 28 years old and probably still living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861, possibly at the same time Rufus Scoville enlisted in Company A.

John was discharged on June 12, 1862, at Judiciary Square hospital in Washington, DC, for “nearsightedness”; he had reportedly “done no camp duty since the battle of Bull Run” on July 21, 1861. The discharging physician noted that he “should never have been enlisted.”

By the end of June of 1862 John was reported at home “having been on the sick list for several weeks.”

It is not known if John ever returned to Michigan. By 1880 he was living in Illinois when he applied for and received a pension (no. 1103718), and that same year he was reportedly apparently single and working as a compositor for and/or living with the family of George Simpson on Throop Street in Chicago.

John died on September 24, 1914 at Pasadena, California and was presumably buried there.

Wednesday, July 21, 2010

Wilbur C. Scott

Wilbur C. Scott was born in 1835 in Sandy Creek, Jefferson County, New York.

Wilbur married New York native Harriet J. (b. 1844), probably in 1859 or 1860, possibly in New York, moving to Michigan shortly afterwards. In any case, they had at least five children: Warren (b. 1866), Edson (b. 1869), Minnie (b. 1871), Delia (b. 1874) and Sheridan (b. 1877).

By 1860 Wilbur was working as a beet farmer living with his wife in Blendon, Ottawa County. Next door lived the family of Justus Wait; he was the father of Walter Wait who would also enlist in Company I. And on the other side from the Wait family farm lived Asahel Tewksbury; he too would join the Third Michigan.

He stood 6’1” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 26 years old and living in Blendon when he enlisted as Third Corporal in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) Wilbur was promoted to Sergeant by the time he was reported sick in the hospital in August of 1862, and he remained hospitalized until he was discharged for heart disease on September 12, 1862, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

After his discharge Wilbur returned to Michigan where he reentered the service as Private in Battery B, First Michigan Light Artillery on December 15, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Blendon, and was mustered the same day probably at Grand Rapids where the battery was originally organized between September 10 and December 14, 1861. (The battery left Michigan on December 17 for St. Louis, Missouri, and during the battle of Shiloh in early April was overwhelmed and captured except for Lang’s section which was attached to Mann’s Battery “C,” First Missouri Artillery. It was subsequently reorganized at Detroit in December of 1862.)

The battery left for Columbus, Kentucky on Christmas day, and remained in Columbus until it was moved to Corinth, Mississippi January 4-9, 1863. It remained in Corinth until early March when it was moved to Bethel, Tennessee and remained on duty there until early June. It subsequently moved back to Corinth on June 7 and remained there until October 29 when it was moved to Pulaski, Tennessee, remaining on duty there until late April of 1864. It participated in the Atlanta campaign from May until September and was on duty at Rome, Georgia until mid-October.

It then moved to Alabama where it participated in numerous operations and was also involved in the March to the Sea November 15 to December 10, in the siege of Savannah in late December and the campaign of the Carolinas from January until April of 1865. It occupied Raleigh, North Carolina on April 14, participated in Johnston’s surrender and the march to Washington via Richmond April 29 to May 19 and the Grand Review on May 24. It was then moved to Detroit June 1-6, 1865.

Wilbur was promoted to Corporal on March 1, 1864, to Sergeant on October 1, and was mustered out on June 14, 1865, at Detroit.

He returned to Michigan, probably to his farm in Blendon where he was living with is wife and two children in 1870. Two houses away lived another former member of the Third Michigan, Roelof (“Ralph”) Steffins. By 1880 Wilber was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children on Taylor street in Grand Rapids. Wilber was living in South Blendon, Ottawa County in September of 1885 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association; he was also a member of Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 in Grand Rapids.

In 1882 he applied for and received a pension (no. 275284).

By 1888 Wilbur had moved to Grand Rapids and was living at 146 Thomas street in 1890 next door to Albert Babcock, formerly of Company B. He may have been working as a carpenter and living at 579 S. East Street in Grand Rapids in 1889-90.

In any case, Wilbur was living at 138 Second Avenue when he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 2445) on July 16, 1895.

Wilbur was staying at the Home when he died of tuberculosis on September 7, 1895, and was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section E lot 3.

His widow was still living in Michigan in late 1895 (?) when she applied for and received a pension (no. 423824).

Tuesday, July 20, 2010

Job Scott

Job Scott, alias “John Wright,” was born in 1842 in England.

Job, who was unable to read or write, left England and immigrated to America, eventually settling western Michigan by 1860 when he was a farm laborer working for a wealthy farmer by the name of Philander Howe in Portland, Ionia County.

He had gray eyes, red hair and a light complexion, and was 19 years old and still residing in Ionia County when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company E on May 13, 1861. Job was shot by a minie ball in the left forearm on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and subsequently reported sick in the hospital (probably in Philadelphia and in Washington) from July of 1862 through January of 1863. He soon returned to the Regiment and was wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run.

He soon ecovered and was transferred on December 8, 1862, to Company M, First United States cavalry, at Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and joined that Regiment on December 23 at Washington, DC. Job probably joined the regiment somewhere along the Rappahannock River in late December. The First U.S. cavalry participated in Stoneman’s raid April 29-May 8, 1863, but by July Job was listed as absent without leave and then reported as a deserter while the regiment was engaged in the third day of battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1863.

According to the War Department, Job apparently enlisted in Company A, Third Maryland cavalry on July 16, 1863, under the name of John Wright.

Following the war Job returned to Michigan. He was married to Michigan native Nancy (b. 1853) and they had at least four children: Nellie (b. 1872), Carlos (b. 1873), George W. (b. 1874) and Carrie Bell (b. 1877).

Job was living near Little Traverse, Emmett County in 1876. During the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association reunion in December of 1876 Association Secretary Silas K. Pierce “read a letter from Job Scott, formerly of Company E, stating that he had settled on a homestead near Little Traverse, Emmet County, that he could not obtain employment, and that his wife was an invalid and himself and little children were destitute. The President [of the association, General Byron Pierce] stated that steps had already been taken to afford Mr. Scott a little relief, when the Association voted to appropriate $15.00 for the same purpose. A box of clothing has been sent to Mr. Scott.”

By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Little Traverse.

Job applied for a pension (no. 1155768) which was possibly rejected because of his uncertain wartime status, and he was living in Grand Rapids in December of 1886 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association. By 1888 he had moved to St. Louis, Gratiot County where he was living in 1890 and 1893.

Job died on September 6, 1895, probably in Gratiot County, and was buried in Ithaca cemetery

Monday, July 19, 2010

George Schwegler

George Schwegler was born on January 28, 1840, in Mellingen or Erlinger, Wurtemberg, Germany, the son of Christian or Johann Jacob.

George immigrated to America, probably with his family and came to Manistee County, Michigan, in 1849 or 1852. He then moved to Muskegon County in 1856 or possibly 1858 or 1859, and, except for his military service, reportedly lived in Muskegon the rest of his life.

He stood 5’8’ with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old laborer living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

George was reportedly wounded in July of 1861, but this cannot be confirmed. He was taken prisoner on June 30 or July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and confined at Libby and Belle Isle prisons in Richmond, Virginia, and was held for six weeks but soon exchanged. On August 6 the Richmond Dispatch reported that at

About 1 o’clock yesterday three thousand of the Federal prisoners on Belle Island left the city for “Varina,” (the farm of Albert Aiken, Esq., twelve miles from Richmond,) a guide having been procured from Capt. Alexander’s detective force to pilot them thither. They went under flag of truce to be exchanged, and were to be met by officers of the United States Army, empowered to effect that object. The party consisted wholly of soldiers, no commissioned officers being in the party. The guard attending the party was composed of a portion of the 42d Mississippi regiment, under Col. Miller. The prisoners were permitted to go by the C. S. Military Prison, and while in front of the building they cheered their imprisoned compatriots, (Generals and other officers,) and otherwise testified their respect for them. They appeared elated at the prospect of going home. The day was intensely hot, and it was intimated, after they had been gone for some hours, that many of them broke down, and had to be left on the way-side, while two or three died. There are 1,700 Yankees yet to go.

George may have been with that very detachment.

He rejoined the Regiment and was shot in the right hip and thigh on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. On August 31 he was admitted to the First Division hospital at Alexandria, Virginia, and by the second week of September he was reported to be in the Mansion House hospital in Alexandria and “doing well.” He was discharged on November 24, 1862, at Alexandria, for “gunshot wound -- ball entering at neck of right femur, opening into and injuring the hip joint and was cut out at anterior lower third of thigh.”

George returned home to Muskegon and worked for a while as a raftsman, probably on the Muskegon River, and was drafted in September of 1863, but claimed exemption because of his alien status.

He married his first wife Norwegian native Tolerice (1845-1914) on November 3, 1864, and they had three children: George (d. 1867), Lucy (d. 1873, and a second daughter Lucy (with whom Tolerice was living in 1914; they may have had as many as nine children in all. (Tolerice immigrated to the US in 1850.) In any case they were subsequently divorced.

Notwithstanding his refusal to be drafted in 1863, George reentered the service in Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry on March 4, 1865, at Grand Rapids for 1 year, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day. He joined the Regiment in April at Burkville, Virginia, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war George returned to Muskegon where he operated a hotel from 1868-72, served as city marshal for three years, and was deputy sheriff for four years. (He was probably working on the boom and living in Muskegon’s Second Ward in 1870.) It was also reported that he was a member of the city police orce for nine years and city marshal for three years. In any case, he returned to the hotel business from 1878 to 1882, and by 1880 he was operating a hotel on Ottawa street in Muskegon’s First Ward and living with his (second?) wife, Wisconsin native Bena (b. 1848). He may have opened a saloon in 1882.

He married his second wife Bavarian native Anna Bodendorfer (1850-1911) on September 8, 1885. She was the widow of one of George’s friends, William Bodendorfer, who had also served in the Old Third during the war. (Anna immigrated to the US in 1868.)

In 1890 he was living in Muskegon city. From about 1895 until his death in 1899 he ran a saloon at 1 Catharine street in Muskegon. He was also a liquor dealer.

George was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, the Grand Army of the Republic Kearny post no. 7 in Muskegon, the Germania Society and he received pension no. 126,694 (dated May 1875), drawing $6.00 per month by 1883.

George died of apoplexy at 7:45 a.m. on Saturday morning, April 29, 1899, at his home at 1 Catharine street, and the funeral was held at the residence at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday afternoon.

“The largest man in Muskegon,” wrote the Detroit Journal, “if not the state is George Schwegler, proprietor of a sample room” in Muskegon. He is 5’10” and weighs 350 pounds stripped. His waist measures 70 [inches]. Known as ‘Little George’ it was while acting as patrolman that he began to grow fleshy.” The Herald wrote that near the end of his life Schwegler had the reputation of being the heaviest man in the state. In 1895 “his weight reached the 400-pound mark, and it was about that time that he began to diet. His weight steadily decreased, until at the time of his death he only weighed 340 pounds. He was about 5 feet seven inches in height. Owing to his extraordinary size, 8 pall bearers will be utilized for his funeral and a special order was placed for the casket.”

George was buried in Oakwood cemetery in Muskegon: 2-21-8.

In September of 1899 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 528422). She was still living at 1 Catherine street in Muskegon when she died in 1911; she was buried alongside George in Oakwood cemetery.

Sunday, July 18, 2010

William Schumacher

William Schumacher was born in 1840 in Prussia.

William immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’5” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

William was wounded on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and subsequently hospitalized in New York City. On June 30 he was discharged from City Hospital in New York City, returned to the Regiment and was awarded the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863. In May he was a Division provost guard, in June a provost guard at Corps headquarters through July and he reenlisted on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids.

William was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. He was transferred as Corporal to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was wounded on June 16 near Petersburg, Virginia, and died of his wounds on June 18 or 19 in a field hospital near Petersburg. William was first buried on the Henry Bryan farm near Meade Station, Virginia, but then reinterred in City Point National Cemetery: grave no. 44.

In 1890 his mother applied for a pension (no. 481078) but the certificate was never granted.

Saturday, July 17, 2010

Hans Schultz

Hans Schultz was born in 1830, probably in Germany.

Hans immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He was 31 years old and possibly living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

Hans was reported as sick in the Regimental hospital in August and September of 1862. He was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

Friday, July 16, 2010

John Peter Scheidt

John Peter Scheidt was born in 1829 in Prussia.

John immigrated to America and settled in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’9” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 32-year-old farmer probably living in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was admitted to the Regimental hospital the night of July 22, 1861, following the battle of Bull Run, Virginia on July 21, and he remained hospitalized in Arlington, Virginia until he was discharged for consumption on November 19, 1861, at Fort Lyon, Virginia.

After he was discharged from the army, John returned to Allegan County. He married French-born Catharine Manes (1843-1875), and they had at least two children: Caroline or Helena (b. 1869), John (b. 1870), Margaretta (b. 1871) and Mathias (b. 1874).

By 1870 John was working as a farmer (he owned $1200 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and two children in Salem, Allegan County. Following the death of his first wife he was married to Anna Mary or Amy (1828-1911) on November 19, 1876. By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his second wife and children in Salem; also living with them was his step-son John Gillis (?). In fact John lived in (New) Salem from 1865 until his death in 1898.

In 1882 he applied for and received a pension (no. 442,383 drawing $12.00 per month in 1897.

John died of Bright’s disease at Salem, on January 17, 1898, and was buried in St. Mary’s cemetery in Salem on January 20.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 510341).

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Thomas Schneider

Thomas Schneider was born in 1832 in Prussia.

Thomas was married to Margaret (b. 1829 in Prussia), possibly in Prussia, and they had at least three children: Jacob (b. 1853), Frank (b. 1856) and Susan (b. 1858).

They emigrated from Prussia to the United States, possibly along with an older brother Mathias and his family, eventually settling in Michigan sometime before 1853. By 1860 Thomas was working as a farmer living with his wife and children in Dorr, Allegan County.

He was 29 years old and still residing in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

Thomas was absent sick in the hospital from October of 1862 through November, and sick in a Washington, DC hospital from December of 1862 through January of 1863. He probably remained hospitalized through May and was sick in Hammond hospital at Point Lookout, Maryland in June.

Although he was carried on Hammond hospital’s rolls in July, Thomas reportedly died July 9, 1863, in the National Hotel hospital run by Dr. Zenas Bliss’ (formerly Regimental surgeon in the Old Third) in Baltimore, Maryland, and was presumably buried in Baltimore. (There is no record of his interment int he National Cemetery in Baltimore, however. If in fact he died at Point Lookout, he may have been buried there.)

In September of 1863 (?) his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 23318). She apparently remarried to a Mr. Becker and in 1864 (?) a John Becker (or Beeker), guardian (no. 42343) filed an application on behalf of at least one minor child.

Wednesday, July 14, 2010

Michael Schmidt

Michael Schmidt was born in 1832 in Ansbach, Bavaria, Germany.

Michael left Germany and came to America, possibly in 1852 or perhaps 1857 eventually settling western Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 5’3” with light eyes and hair and a light complexion and was a 29-year-old common laborer possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for consumption on July 27, 1861, at either Washington, DC or Arlington, Virginia.

After his discharge from the army Michael returned to western Michigan and eventually settled in Grand Rapids where he probably lived out the remainder of his life. (He may have been living with his family on Bridge street in 1880.) He was living in Grand Rapids in September of 1885 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and he was also a member of the German (presently Immanuel) Lutheran church on North Division and Michigan Avenues in Grand Rapids where he was still living in 1890. He was possibly the same Michael Schmidt working as a carpenter and living at 208 Scribner in 1889 and 1890.

In 1890 he applied for a pension (no. 874560) but the certificate was never granted.
Michael died of pneumonia at Butterworth hospital in Grand Rapids, on May 5, 1912, and the funeral service was held at 1:00 p.m. at his residence, 133 Brainard street, and at 2:00 p.m. at the German Lutheran church. He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section 1 lot 16. (The obituary incorrectly calls him “George” when it is in fact Michael who was buried in Oak Hill: 1-16 with a government stone that lists his service in the Old Third.)

Tuesday, July 13, 2010

Ludwig Frederick Schmidt

Ludwig Frederick Schmidt was born in 1823 in Wurtemberg, Germany, the son of Karl and Eva (Heinch or Heinich).

Ludwig may have come to America as early as 1830. In any case he was certainly in the U.S. before the Mexican War broke out since he allegedly participated in that conflict. He eventually moved westward and settled in western Michigan.

Ludwig was probably living in Grand Rapids, Kent County, when he married Wurtemberg native Paulina Hartman (b. 1838) on August 16, 1859, in Grand Rapids; and they had at least two children: Ludwig F. Jr. (b. 1863) and Emma (b. 1866). Paulina had apparently been married before and had a daughter Pauline (b. 1857) by the previous marriage. The service was performed by Rev. Francis Cuming who would eventually serve as the first chaplain of the Third Michigan infantry.

By October of 1859 Ludwig was living in Grand Rapids when he joined the Grand Rapids Rifles, commanded by Captain Chris. Kusterer -- who was also a witness at Ludwig’s wedding. (The GRR or “German Rifles” would serve as the nucleus for Company C of the Third Michigan infantry.) Ludwig (listed as “Frederick Smith”) was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward; also living with them was 50-year-old Frederick Hartman, presumably Paulina’s father.

Ludwig stood 5’9” with brown eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was a 38-year-old blacksmith probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. He was discharged on either December 31, 1861, or January 1, 1862, at Fort Lyon, Virginia, for “varicose veins of five years’ standing.”

In January of 1862 he applied for and received a pension (no. 291730), drawing $2.00 in 1886, increased to $12.00 in 1892.

Ludwig returned to Grand Rapids, and by 1865-66 was working as a blacksmith and living at 10 Bronson street; in 1868-69 he living on the northwest corner of Winter and Shawmut streets, on the west side of the Grand River. In 1870 he was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. By 1880 Ludwig was still working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and two children in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward. (Next door lived August Schmidt who had also served in the Third Michigan during the war. August was born in Saxony.)

He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 208) February 1, 1886, dismissed on June 5, 1886, readmitted November 25, 1891 and discharged at his own request on August 17, 1892. He was admitted to the Home for the final time on April 12, 1893.

Ludwig died of “old age,” chronic bronchitis and heart disease at the Home at 11:00 a.m. on October 7, 1905, and was buried in the Home cemetery: section 4 row 18 grave 2.

The week following his death his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 605876).

Monday, July 12, 2010

Christian Schmidt

Christian Schmidt was born on June 9, 1838, in Haddesheim, Germany, the son of Christian and Anna.

Christian (younger) immigrated to the United States in 1855 and settled first in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but moved to Muskegon, Muskegon County in 1856, and by 1860 was a fireman living at the same boarding house in Muskegon with George Root, William Ryan and Thomas Waters (all of whom would enlist in Company H).

He stood 5’11’ with brown eyes and hair and a dark complexion and was a 23-year-old laborer probably living in Muskegon when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) Christian was taken prisoner on July 1, 1862, at Malvern Hill, Virginia, and confined briefly at Libby prison in Richmond, Virginia. he was quite possibly paroled on August 5. On August 6 the Richmond Dispatch reported that at

About 1 o’clock yesterday three thousand of the Federal prisoners on Belle Island left the city for “Varina,” (the farm of Albert Aiken, Esq., twelve miles from Richmond,) a guide having been procured from Capt. Alexander’s detective force to pilot them thither. They went under flag of truce to be exchanged, and were to be met by officers of the United States Army, empowered to effect that object. The party consisted wholly of soldiers, no commissioned officers being in the party. The guard attending the party was composed of a portion of the 42d Mississippi regiment, under Col. Miller. The prisoners were permitted to go by the C. S. Military Prison, and while in front of the building they cheered their imprisoned compatriots, (Generals and other officers,) and otherwise testified their respect for them. They appeared elated at the prospect of going home. The day was intensely hot, and it was intimated, after they had been gone for some hours, that many of them broke down, and had to be left on the way-side, while two or three died. There are 1,700 Yankees yet to go.

Christian was quite probably with that very detachment. (William Monroe was also paroled at Aiken’s Landing on August 5 and returned to the regiment on August 8 at Harrison’s Landing.) In any case, Christian returned to the Regiment on August 8 at Harrison’s Landing, Virginia.

Christian reenlisted as Corporal on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids, and went home to Michigan on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864.

While home on furlough he married Prussian-born Sophia Foegen (1845-1922) on January 22; they had at least five children: Mrs. Frank X. Vogel, Rhoda, Christian M., Frank J. and Andrew W. (In the 1870 census of Muskegon they are listed as: Mary, b. 1865; Magdalene, b. 1867, and a son, b. 1869.)

He was supposed to return to the Regiment on January 25, 1864, but, along with several other members of the Old Third on furlough in Grand Rapids, missed the special train out of Grand Rapids for Detroit and did not leave Grand Rapids until January 30. One of his traveling companions was Theodore Castor, a Sergeant in Company C, who many years later described that return journey:

We got to Detroit late in the evening and went to a restaurant close to the depot and ordered something to eat and while eating I picked on Christian Schmidt to go along with me after supper to get transportation for all of us and told the rest of the boys to be sure and stay there until we got back, so as to be handy in case we needed them. So after supper I and Christian we washed up and brushed up, put on our belts, cartridge box and bayonet, white gloves and collars and started up to Woodward Avenue to Colonel Smith's office. And arriving there where we were passed in the office and standing at attention, saluted the Colonel and I told him that I had a squad of men down at the depot and that I wanted transportation for them to Washington. When he got up and he stood right in front of me and I thought he was going to look right through me, and asked me for my authority and written orders. And when I told him that I never had any written orders and how the Captain in command of the Regiment had detailed me and my companion, Corporal Christian Schmidt at the time when the train was ready to pull out, to go back to town and hunt up the stragglers and report to Colonel Smith at Detroit. He said to me “I believe you are a straggler yourself.” But he asked me and Corporal Schmidt's name and rank and the number of stragglers I had down at the depot and told the clerk to write out an order to the Quarter-Master (I had been a little excited when he asked for the number of the men and I told him there were 18 when there were only 12 of us) for 18 men's transportation to Washington. And further told me that after I got done with the Quartermaster to start right out as there was a train going out at 12 o'clock and if the guard found us around there in the morning they would treat us as deserters. And I said yes to everything he said. When the clerk handed me over the order I felt somewhat relieved and went over to the Quartermaster's office on the same floor with lots of courage, and when I handed him the order he wanted to know who had command of the men and I told him that I had. He sat down and asked me my name and what office I held in my Company and when I told him that it was Sergeant of Company C, Third Michigan Infantry, he told me that the Third Infantry went through Detroit three or four days ago on a Special and that if we got out that night we might catch up with them. His plan was to get us out of town on the first train. I told him yes to every remark he made. He then went on to ask me every name of my command and after I had given him twelve I hesitated a second and when I couldn't think of any more right quick, I told him there were new recruits and I couldn't think of their names. So he put them down Recruits and handed me the big envelope with the transportation inside and told me to be sure and get started that night, and I felt as if I had won a great big battle.

Well, I and Christian went down to the restaurant to tell the boys the good luck we had and to get ready to start out, but found no boys there. They had left their guns and everything in care of the land-lord who had it locked in a room and they had told him they would be back after the theatre, and if we got there before they to wait. We waited until after mid-night when we made a bed on the floor and went to sleep. And when we woke up in the morning we waited again until about ten o'clock when some of them came. And as I and Christian didn't want to be caught on the sidewalk for fear of being arrested by the Provost Guard, I sent them back to hunt up the rest, and along sometime in the afternoon they all came in.

We all stayed at the restaurant until after dark when we slipped to the depot and left Detroit at 8 o'clock and got to Cleveland, Ohio in the morning where we got out and where one of our boys met his brother-in-law who entertained us all day and part of the night and showed us the sights of the city. We left there sometime in the night and got to Pittsburgh, Penn. next morning where we made another stop and where we were entertained by Professor Nagel -- a brother of Rudolph Nagel -- Sergeant of our Company and with us at the time. And at night left there for Harrisburg and had to lay over four hours and started for Baltimore, and when we got in the big depot found the Third Michigan with their special train side-tracked. We didn't want them to see us but our orderly Sergeant got a glimpse of us and he came over to our car and told us that we would have to join them and if we didn't he would report us as deserters. When I told him that I had command of those men and that I had orders from Provost Marshal Colonel Smith of Detroit, Michigan to report at Provost Headquarters in Washington, he let us alone. And we changed cars and soon started on and left them on the side track. When we got to Washington we went to a restaurant and ordered something to eat, and when I inquired of the landlord about the Guard he told me that we would be all safe, that they had just left and they wouldn't visit him any more that day. We spent our time between the restaurant and depot until some time in the night when the special came with the Third Michigan Infantry and we joined them, and never heard of any bad effects it would have on account of our traveling alone.

Christian was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He had been promoted to Sergeant by the time he was reported absent on furlough in January of 1865. He was absent sick in February, and mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Christian returned to Muskegon where he lived the rest of his life. By 1870 he was working as a sawyer in the mills and living with his wife and children in Muskegon’s Third Ward. He became a city policeman and was working as a policeman from 1877 to 1882, and in 1889-90 was a constable living at 358 W. Clay Avenue in Muskegon. (He may have been the same Christian Schmidt who was proprietor of the Cincinnati House on 352 W. Clay Avenue.)

In 1890 he was Director of the Poor in Muskegon. He also served as a deputy marshal, was elected constable (possibly in the Seventh Ward) several times, served as supervisor of the Seventh Ward for two terms, and was a member of the supervisors’ committee on gravel roads.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and a charter (1879) member of the Grand Army of the Republic Kearny post no. 7 in Muskegon. In 1887 he applied for and received a pension (no. 449477, dated 1887).

Christian died of Bright’s disease at 4:20 a.m. on June 22, 1893, at his home at 358 West Clay Avenue in Muskegon, and was buried in St. Mary’s cemetery: B-4, in Muskegon.

In July of 1893 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 413019).

Sunday, July 11, 2010

August Schmidt

August Schmidt was born on June 15, 1832, in Freiburg, Saxony, Germany, the son of August.

August (younger) immigrated to America and settled in Michigan in 1853, and before the war lived variously in Grand Rapids, Ionia, Ionia County and Holland, Ottawa County. In 1860 August was working as a carpenter and living in Ionia, Ionia County.

He stood 5’4” with hazel eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 28-year-old carpenter residing in Holland when he reportedly walked to Grand Rapids in order to enlist in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

He had been promoted to Sergeant by the time he was wounded in the right arm either on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, or August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. In either case, he was subsequently absent in the hospital from August of 1862 and by early September was reported as a recent amputee in Carver hospital in Washington, DC. He was discharged on October 12, 1862, at Carver hospital, in Washington, DC, for loss of his right arm.

Following his discharge from the army August returned to Grand Rapids where he worked as a bookkeeper for the brewer Chris Kusterer from 1865-69, and was residing at 64 Kent street.

He married Prussian-born Josephina Rohlerage (1846-1929) on August 3, 1867 in Lowell, and they had at least one child, Walter K. (1868-1938).

By 1870 August was working as a saloon keeper and living with is wife and child in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. By 1880 August was working as an insurance agent and living with his wife and son in Grand Rapids’ Fourth Ward. (Next door lived Ludwig F. Schmidt who had also served in the Third Michigan. Ludwig was born in Wurtemberg.) In fact August lived his entire postwar life in Grand Rapids, much of it in the Fourth Ward.

By 1889 August was working as an insurance agent and residing at 366 Ottawa street in Grand Rapids; by 1890 he was also working in real estate as well and still residing on Ottawa Street. He served several terms as constable and ward tax collector.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, serving as its president in 1888, a member of the Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 Grand Rapids, a Democrat, and as a young man was active in German music circles such as the Arion Society. August was elected treasurer of the Valhalla Lodge no. 249 of the IOOF in January of 1882, and he was also a member of the German Arbeiter Society, the IOOF Lodge No. 249.

He was also actively involved with the German Veterans’ Association, and on September 16, 1890, the Democrat reported that

A score or so of German veterans of the late war met in the reading room of the Bridge Street House last evening for the purpose of making arrangements for a turn out on German day, October 6. Julius Fenger acted as chairman of the meeting and Julius Caesar as secretary. The following were appointed a general committee of arrangements: August Schmidt, Henry Schnabel, Julius Rathman, Julius Fenger [formerly of Company C], Ely Koehler, A. Rash, Frank Muhlenberg [formerly in Company C], Gustav Landau, Julius Caesar. Ward committees will also be appointed. The intention is to take part in the parade on German day. None but actual veterans of the war of the rebellion and native Germans will be permitted to take part in the parade, and these will be provided with special badges and will march under the United States flag. This is intended as an emphatic declaration of loyalty and patriotism of German citizens. There are about 200 German vets in the city. Veterans from out of town will also be invited to participate. The headquarters of the German Brigade will be at the Bridge Street House. Another meeting will be held next Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock at Arbeiter Hall to further perfect arrangements.

Schmidt provided an affidavit in the pension claim by Jacob Stegg’s widow. August provided an affidavit in the pension application of another former member of the Old Third, Mathias Baeker.

In 1862 he applied for and received pension no. 10,069, drawing $24.00 per month in 1883.

He died of valvular heart disease at his home at 366 Ottawa street in Grand Rapids on Saturday December 23, 1905, and the funeral service was held at the residence at 1:30 p.m. on Tuesday afternoon, December 26. He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section 8 lot 20.

The Herald observed that Schmidt “belonged to that progressive and sturdy element of German-Americans that has done much to develop the business growth of Grand Rapids and was honored and respected by all who knew him.”

In January of 1906 his widow was still living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 608833).

Saturday, July 10, 2010

George Schermerhorn

George Schermerhorn was born in 1839 in Ontario, Canada, the son of Daniel (1804-1887) and Ann (Wall, 1810-1891).

His father was born in New York and married New Brunswick native Ann sometime before 1829, presumably in Canada where they were living by 1829. The family moved to Michigan from Canada sometime between 1846 and 1850 when George was attending school with his siblings and living with his family on a farm in Walker, Kent County. In 1860 George was still working as a farmer and still living with his family in Walker, where his father owned and operated a substantial farm.

George stood 5’11’ with brown eyes, sandy hair and a light complexion and was a 22-year-old farmer living with his family in Walker when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was absent sick at Alexandria, Virginia from October of 1862 until he was discharged on December 28, 1862, at the Third Corps hospital, near Fort Lyon, Virginia, suffering from consumption and chronic diarrhea.

George eventually returned to Walker. He married his first wife Canadian-born Elizabeth Ann Edison (b. 1832) on December 26, 1866, in Grand Rapids, and by 1870 he and Elizabeth were living with her parents on their farm in Walker. He continued farming until about 1872 when he moved into Grand Rapids where he worked for many years as a carpenter and builder.

He was living in Grand Rapids in 1879 when he married his second wife Michigan native Dana Smith Rounds (b. 1843) on January 27, 1879. By 1880 he was working as a carpenter and living with his wife on Canal street in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward; next door was the office of Dr. Walter Morrison who had also served in the Third Michigan as a hospital steward.

In 1878 he applied for and eventually received a pension (no. 324387)

George was still living in Grand Rapids when he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 250) on March 10, 1886. He was discharged from the Home on May 15, 1886 as a consequence of “local aid discontinued,” and was residing in Paris, Kent County in 1890; by the following year had returned to Grand Rapids. He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association (and served as its president in 1890), as well as Grand Army of the Republic Custer post no. 5 in Grand Rapids.

George died of “rheumatism of the heart” at 12:00 (noon?) on December 26, 1891, at his home, 840 Hall street (corner Hall and Salem), in Grand Rapids. According to the Democrat,

Since the war the deceased has suffered ill health almost continuously as a result of disease contracted in the service. For the past 10 years he has suffered acute pain at times, arising from a diseased condition of the bowels. This difficulty of late has been very frequent and excruciating agony has accompanied its recurrence. On Thursday night last the patient had to succumb to his malady and go to bed. His condition steadily grew worse from that time to the moment of his death and the event came as a release from suffering too intense for human endurance. In his lifetime deceased was an active, energetic man. He was congenial in his relations to his fellow men and respected and beloved by a wide circle of friends and acquaintances. He was an honored member of Custer post and during the year ending with Dec. 16 last was president of the Old 3rd Inf. association. He attended the reunion of his Regiment on the date mentioned. The day before Christmas he was down town for the last time.

The funeral was held at the residence on Thursday morning at 10:00 a.m., arranged by Colonel Edwin S. Pierce (formerly of the Old Third). He was buried in Oak Hill cemetery: section D lot 44

At the annual reunion of the association held in December of 1892, the following resolution was read and entered into the records: “Whereas - Shortly after our last reunion, our honored and beloved President Geo Schermerhorn, was by the Supreme ruler called from our midst to join the army of patriots above, Resolved -- that we we deeply regret, that he who we so much loved,. should be taken from us, while yet in the prime of life, and that we extend to his bereaved wife and family our sincere sympathy. That we feel that his wife and all his relatives, as well as ourselves, may feel proud that they have been connected with so good a man, soldier and citizen. That we feel an assurance of the eternal bliss of Geo Schermerhorn, that we cordially invite his wife to consider herself an honorary member of the” association. She did.

In 1892 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 336978).

Friday, July 09, 2010

Charles Schasberger

Charles Schasberger was born in 1834.

Charles was married to Frederika (b. 1832) and they had at least one child, a daughter Mary (b. 1860).

Charles was 27 years old and living in Lansing or Monroe County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

(Neither Charles nor his wife Frederika (or Frederica) appear in the 1860 census records for Ingham, Kent or Monroe counties.)

He was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and was buried in Seven Pines National Cemetery: section B, grave 155.

In July of 1862 Frederika applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 1286). She eventually remarried to a Frederick Rapp or Rabb (b. 1831 in Saxony) and in 1870 she applied on behalf of a minor child for a pension which was granted (no. 144196). She may have been living in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward in 1870.

Thursday, July 08, 2010

Valentine Schaefer

Valentine Schaefer was born on October 16, 1836, in Hesse Darmstadt, Germany.

Valentine immigrated to the United States and headed west, eventually settling in western Michigan. He was possibly the younger brother of one Phillip Shaffer (b. c. 1822) who was also from Darmstadt, and who was married there and had immigrated to the United States eventually settling in Michigan sometime before 1859. By 1860 Philip and his family were living in Chester, Ottawa County.

In any case, Valentine stood 5’11” with brown eyes and hair, and a dark complexion and was a 24-year-old farmer probably living in Allegan County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.) He was discharged for general debility on November 16, 1861, at Fort Lyon, Virginia.

Valentine eventually returned to Michigan and was living in Lisbon, Chester Township, Ottawa County when he married Wurtemberg native Katerina Breitmeier (1842-1923) on November 26, 1867, and they had at least one child, Karl or Charles (b. 1870).

In 1867 he was living in Lisbon, Kent County, along the County line with Ottawa County, and by 1870 Valentine and his wife were living on a large farm in Lisbon (near Philip and his family) and in 1880 he and his wife and son Charles were living on a farm next to his older brother (?) Philip and his family. He was living in Lisbon in 1888, in Lisbon or in Chester, Ottawa County in 1890. In fact Valentine probably lived the remainder of his life in the vicinity of Lisbon.

In 1886 he applied for and received a pension (no. 768495).

He died on December 3, 1910, presumably in Chester, and was buried in the Lutheran cemetery.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 714978).

Wednesday, July 07, 2010

Stephen Scales,

Stephen Scales was born in 1842 in New York, the son of Ishial or Jehial (b. 1803).

"Ishial" was born in New Hampshire and eventually settled in New York where he resided for some years before moving west. He left New York sometime after 1850 and by 1860 he had brought his family to western Michigan and was working as a farmer in Georgetown, Ottawa County (nearby lived the family of Harley Bement who would also enlist in Company I.)

By 1860 Stephen was a mill worker living at the Paddock boarding house for laborers in Georgetown, Ottawa County, along with: John Finch (Company I), Joseph Ledbeter (Company B), Benjamin Parker (Company I), James Parm (Company I), Thomas Rowling (Company I), Alfred (Company F) and William Tate (Company I), and John M. Taylor (Company I).

Stephen was 19 years old and residing in Georgetown when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

He died of typhoid fever on April 30 or May 1, 1862, at Yorktown, Virginia. According to the Regimental Surgeon Dr. Zenas Bliss,

The regiment was attached to General Berry’s brigade of General Kearney’s division of the Third Corps, and arrived at Fort Monroe on March 26th, 1862, and shortly afterwards moved to Yorktown, and encamped in a thick woods, intermingled with patches of swamp and pools of water, the ground being covered with fragments of fallen trees and decaying vegetable matter. Water could be obtained only by digging holes from two and a half to three feet in depth, and the surface obtained form these was all that the men had. The regiment remained in this camp about five weeks, and was doing picket and fatigue duty on trenches and fortifications all that time. A few intermittents and remittents [fevers] occurred, as also about forty cases of typhoid fever, all very severe, marked by epistaxis tympanitis, and, after a few days, hemorrhage from the bowels, the blood being evidently impoverished. Several of these cases proved fatal.

One case of typhus, marked by hemorrhage from the nose and bowels, and with petchiae and hemorrhagic spots on the surface, occurred in the regiment and proved fatal. All of these patients had active, supporting treatment throughout. The sick were cared for at a hospital, about a mile and a half to the rear, composed of log huts or barracks, built and formerly occupied by the 53d Virginia Volunteers (Confederate), upon a sandy soil, where we obtained an abundance of excellent well water. These barracks were well ventilated, and accommodated a large number of sick and wounded from both the regulars and volunteers. I saw all of the sick and what few wounded there were at this hospital and had immediate charge of very many sick who were members of various regiments; and nearly all of the cases were either low remittents or typhoid fever. I say remittents, because some of them might be easily classed as such; but I believed then, as now, that they were almost pure enteric fever. I held autopsies of all that died who were under my charge, six in number. No post mortem was held on the case of typhus. All the deaths from typhoid fever occurred late in the course of the disease, and the majority from hemorrhages from the bowels, one from coma, and the others apparently from pure exhaustion. The abdominal viscera were those principally examined. Peyer’s glands were found in each case in a state of ulceration; some very large ulcers; some healing while others were in an inflamed condition. Some of the ulcerations extended nearly through the coats of the intestines. I preserved the specimens in each case, but subsequently lost them during the campaign. The small intestines, through their entire length, gave evidence of previous inflammatory action; but all the other abdominal viscera gave no evidence of either organic or serious functional disease, and the soft parts and glands, when divided with the scalpel, seemed to be almost exsanguined. I wish the blood could have been analysed, because I feel confident that the primary trouble was there. In cases of epistaxis, the blood gave only a faint coloring to the spots on linen, and it did not give to the linen that stiffened feel that we get when it is saturated with ordinary blood, from both of which I infer that the blood was deficient in plasma and coloring matter, or defibrinated. In these cases, quinine, brandy, ammonia, and small doses of opium were given with a view to support the patient. Essence of beef and beef tea, of good quality, and in abundance, was furnished and given. The supply of medicines at this time was ample, but at times we were deficient in hospital stores.

He was presumably buried among the unknown soldiers at Yorktown National Cemetery (or he may have been brought home to Michigan for interment).

No pension seems to be available.

Tuesday, July 06, 2010

Charles H. C. Scaddin

Charles H. C. Scaddin was born on December 3, 1837, in Summerfield (?), New York, the son of Charles (b. 1798) and Amy (Sales, b. 1801).

His parents were born in New York and was presumably married there sometime before 1825. The family moved from New York to Michigan sometime between 1842 and 1844, and by 1850 Charles (younger) was living with his family in Grand Rapids where his father worked a a carpenter. Next door lived one Nathan Sines who would also join the Third Michigan.

By 1860 Charles was working as a sawyer living with and/or working for Mr. Driesbach in Alpine, Kent County and working at the same mill as Mortimer Parish (who would enlist in Company D).

Charles (younger) stood 5’8,” with blue eyes, light complexion and brown hair and was 23 years old and probably still residing in Alpine when he enlisted in Company F. He was reported serving with the ambulance corps from October of 1862 through December. In February of 1863 he was a provost guard at Third Corps headquarters, and in March was sick with intermittent fever. He returned to duty and in April was ill with bronchitis. He was sick with diarrhea from May 18-28, and was detached as provost guard at division headquarters from January 8, 1864, until the end of April. He was suffering from miasmatic disease from March 4-12, admitted on March 24, 1864, to Second Division hospital in Alexandria, Virginia, suffering from “debility,” and was reported absent sick from April through May, possibly at one point in the Methodist church hospital in Alexandria. Charles was working as a clerk in a hospital in Washington, DC when he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit .

Following his discharge Charles returned to Michigan and lived for a time in Grand Rapids.

He married Michigan native Marian E. Devenport or Davenport (b. 1835) on April 9, 1865, in Alpine, Kent County and they had at least three children, Sylvia (b. 1866), Amy (b. 1872), Daisa (b. 1875).

Charles was living in Alpine with his wife and one child in 1870, and by 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and three daughters in Sparta, Kent County.

He and Marion separated in March of 1881. According to a statement Mariam made in 1916, they separated “only because of the soldier’s habits and of his non-support of his family.” (However, another witness, Syrina Mapes, Charles’ sister testified that they separated in the “early 90s”; and other other sources claim between 1895 and 1900.) William Davenport, a cousin of Mariam’s, testified in 1916 that Mariam left Charles “sometime in the nineties . . . because of the soldier’s drinking intoxicating liquors to excess, and his abuse of his family,” but that she never divorced him.

Charles was living in Englishville, Kent County when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in September of 1885, and resided for a time in Mill Creek, Kent County, and for many years worked as a sawyer and farmer. He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 4104) on September 18, 1903 and was subsequently dishonorably discharged from the Home, presumably for drunkenness, on three separate occasions: first on December 11, 1903, readmitted December 16; discharged March 16, 1906, and readmitted March 19; and discharged April 5, 1906. He was readmitted on December 23, 1908, and transferred to the Kalamazoo State Hospital in November of 1912.

One month prior to his transfer to Kalamazoo “His trouble began,” so the hospital admission record notes, “by his mistreating associates and attendants and rebelling against the discipline. He gradually became very abusive and profane and finally became destructive, tearing his clothes and attempting to destroy the furniture, etc.” He was admitted at 4:00 p.m. on November 9, 1912, with a diagnosis of “acute alcoholism.” The admitting physicians further noted that “His ideas of time and place are very poor” and that he was “bothered a good deal by the idea the some one is persecuting him.” Apparently he suffered from loss of memory, and insisted on getting into bed with other inmates of the Michigan Soldiers’ Home. The examination concluded that he was “inclined to be a trifle irritable” and that his will was “diminished.” “The patent’s social relations were seemingly innocent enough: he was not thought ‘aggressive’ nor ‘very talkative’, and when he was questioned closely he ‘rather inclined to be irritable.’”

His emotional state continued to worsen and his abusiveness and hostility to those around him increased, and he began failing physically as well. On April 17, 1915, he was described as “becoming more deteriorated; irritable spells; complains of feeling numb and dizzy; disoriented; nephritis. This patient is gradually becoming more feeble” and “he complains of feeling dizzy. He was also observed to be more “filthy in his habits.” By the end of the year he was observed to be “very confused” and was often observed to be “crawling about the ward.” The treatment of choice was a quarter grain of morphine. (Charles may in fact have suffered from Alzheimer’s disease.)

Charles was a Protestant. In 1896 he applied for and received pension no. 908,433, drawing $6.00 in 1903 and increased to $12.00 by 1908.

Charles died of interstitial nephritis (renal failure) on February 10, 1916, at the Kalamazoo Hospital and his remains were sent to Grand Rapids where they were buried in the Michigan Soldiers’ Home cemetery: section 7 row 6 lot 30.

His widow was residing in Sparta, Kent County in 1916, the same year she applied for and received pension no. 814,292.

Monday, July 05, 2010

Lyman Allen Sayles

Lyman Allen Sayles was born on October 21, 1844, in Keene, Ionia County, Michigan, the son of Cyrenius Chapin (1812-1893) and Eliza (Gardner, b. 1816).

New York native Cyrenius and Canadian Eliza were married in East Dumfries, Canda, in 1835 and resided in Canada for some years. Between 1842 and 1844 Cyrenius, probably along with his brother Elias, took his family and left Canada, eventually settling in Keene, Ionia County, Michigan where he farmed for many years and raised 15 children. (Elias also settled in Keene.) One source described Cyrenius as “a man universally respected and liked, while having strong opinions his humerous expressions of them gave no one offence.”

By 1850 Lyman was living with his family on a farm in Keene. Nearby lived his cousins John and William Sayles, two of Elias’ sons, who would also enlist in the Third Michigan, as would two of the Soules boys who lived near both Sayles families. By 1860 Lyman was living with his family and attending school with ten of his siblings, one of whom, Olive, was the teacher, in Keene.

Lyman stood 5’6” with dark eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a 17-year-old farmer probably living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company H on November 21, 1861, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered on December 13 at Detroit. (He was probably related to John and/or William Sayles of Company G and Company C respectively.) Lyman was reported absent sick in the hospital from July of 1862 through August, but according to Liuetenant William Ryan of Company H, in fact he had been absent in the hospital since the first of May.

Although he was reported as having deserted on September 21 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, Lyman had in fact been discharged from the army on either June 28, 1862, at Detroit or October 3, 1862 at Edward’s Ferry, Maryland, for “anchylosis of the fingers of his right hand, prior to enlistment.”

Lyman listed Lowell, Ionia County as his mailing address on his discharge paper (he probably lived along the border between Kent and Ionia counties), and he probably returned to the Lowell-Keene area after his discharge.

It appears that he was living in Lowell when he enlisted at the age of 20 on March 24, 1865, in Company A, Sixth Michigan Cavalry and was mustered the same day. He was discharged on August 4, 1865, at Fort Laramie, Dakota Territory.

Lyman eventually returned to Michigan.

He may have been living in Eaton County in 1870.

For reasons which remain unclear, Pinkney Cemetery records in Ionia County report that Lyman died on July 2, 1878 (or July 16, 1868), presumably in Ionia County and was buried in Pinkney cemetery, Ionia County: lot 13, row 3, grave 8. (His wife was not buried in the same lot; but was buried elsewhere in the cemetery. Lyman’s brother Merritt was living in Keene, Ionia County in 1894. Lyman was not found in Pinkney cemetery. His uncle Elias is buried in Pinkney, however, along with a number of other Sayles’family members. Cyrenius is buried in Oakwood cemetery in Lowell.)

Lyman was married three times: first to Indiana native Sara Martin (b. 1847) on February 23, 1863 in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County, and that they had one child, a son Jesse E. (b. 1870 in Indiana). He was married a second time to Emma Jane Huntington (d. 1881), in Pierson, Montcalm County, Michigan, on July 5, 1874, and that they had at least three children: Laverne (b. 1878), Lyman A. (b. 1878) -- they were possibly twins -- and Ingersoll (b. 1879). Emma may have been married previously and probably one son, Illinois-born Emmet C. (b. 1867) by her first husband. Lyman was reportedly married a third time to one Hattie Belle Griswold (b. 1866 in New York) on December 3, 1882 in Ionia, Michigan. They had at least four children: Hattie Mae (b. 1883), Lilla Alta (b. 1886), Lyman Jay (b. 1892) and Elma Alta (b. 1895).

Lyman and Hattie lived in Evergreen, Montcalm County for some years before moving to South Lyon, Oakland County. Lyman who had worked as a farmer and school teacher eventually became a physician and for many years he practiced in South Lyon, Oakland County. Lyman was living in South Lyon, Oakland County in 1894.)

In 1880 Lyman applied for and received a pension (no. 354745), drawing $72.00 per month by 1928.

In 1928 Lyman was admitted to the hospital at the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 8184) in Grand Rapids, and was apparently under the guardianship of one Allen Wilkinson of South Lyon, Oakland County.

Lyman was still living at the Home when he died on October 19, 1931. and his body was sent to South Lyon for burial.

His widow applied for a pension (no. 1706373), but the certificate was never granted.

Saturday, July 03, 2010

John and William Sayles

John Sayles was born in 1846 in Ionia County, Michigan, the son of Elias (1803-1897) and Hannah (Showers, 1808-1872).

New York native Elias Sr. married Canadian-born Hannah in about 1826 in Ontario, Canada where they lived for many years. (Around 1871 Elias remarried after Hannah’s death to one Eliza Sayles (b. about 1818).) Elias, probably along with his brother Cyrenius and his family, moved from Canada to Michigan sometime between 1843 and 1846, and by 1850 John was living with his family and attending school with his older siblings (which also included his older brother William who would enlist in Company F) in Keene, Ionia County; next door lived Charles and Harrison Soules, both of whom would enlist in Company C in 1861. And not much farther away lived a Sayles cousin, Lyman, Cyrenius’ son, who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.

John stood 5’7” with black eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 16-year-old farmer probably living in Lowell, Kent County or in Keene when he enlisted in Company G on April 4, 1862, at Lowell for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (He may have been related to Lyman Sayles of Company H.) By late June, according to Homer Thayer of Company G, John was sick in the hospital at Annapolis, Maryland, and he remained absent sick in the hospital through September when he allegedly deserted on September 21 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia. In fact, he was discharged for consumption on June 24, 1862, at Annapolis, Maryland.

After he was discharged John returned to Michigan where he reentered the service in L company, Sixth Michigan cavalry on February 27, 1865, for 1 year at Grand Rapids, age 21, and was mustered on February 28 at Grand Rapids, crediting Keene. He joined the Regiment March 19, was absent sick in May -- he may have missed the participation by the regiment in the Grand Review in Washington on May 23 -- and was discharged, probably for disability, on June 23, 1865, at Washington, DC.

John eventually returned to Michigan after the war.

He married Mary M. Gardner on February 21, 1867, and they had at least three children: Rebecca (b. 1869), Lewis (b. 1872) and Leon (b. 1874). He may have been living in Lowell, Kent County by 1870.

By 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife and children in Berlin (Saranac), Ionia County. He was living in Otisco, Ionia County in 1890.

In 1880 he applied for and eventually received a pension (no. 984966).

John died on June 17, 1921, probably in Michigan.

In 1921 his widow was residing in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 905653).

William R. Sayles was born in 1839 in Canada, the son of Elias (1803-1897) and Hannah (Showers, b. 1808).

New York native Elias Sr. married Canadian-born Hannah in about 1826 in Ontario, Canada where they lived for many years. His family moved from Canada to Michigan sometime between 1843 and 1846, and by 1850 William was living with his family and attending school with his siblings (which included a younger brother John who would enlist in Company G in 1862) in Keene, Ionia County; next door lived Charles and Harrison Soules, both of whom would enlist in Company C in 1861. And not much farther away lived a Sayles cousin, Lyman, Cyrenius’ son, who would also enlist in the Third Michigan.William farmed for some years in Keene before the war, and in 1860 he was working as a farm laborer and/or living with the Matthew brown family in Keene; his parents were still living in keene as well.

William stood 6’1’’ with dark eyes, hair and complexion and was a 23-year-old farmer living in Saranac, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was transferred to Company B on June 12.

There is no further record.

In fact, William may have never left with the Third Michigan when it departed Grand Rapids on June 13, 1861, and it is quite possible that he was the same William Sayles, a resident of Ionia County, who enlisted as a Private on September 5, 1861, at Marshall, in Company H, Second Michigan cavalry for three years, and was mustered on October 12. He reportedly deserted on March 22, 1863, in Michigan.

Again, there is no further record.

William may have been the same William Sayles, age 25, who enlisted in L company, Sixth Michigan Cavalry at Grand Rapids on January 29, 1864, for 3 years, crediting Keene, Ionia County, and was mustered on January 30. (Both his brother John and their cousin Lyman who also started out in the Third Michigan infantry also reentered the service in the Sixth Michigan Cavalry.)

He joined the Regiment near Stevensburg, Virginia about February 15, and was serving with the wagon train as a teamster from December of 1864 through March of 1865. In June he was on detached service as a teamster through July, and he claimed some years after the war to have been seriously injured by an accident at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas in the summer of 1865. (The Sixth had been transferred to Fort Leavenworth on June 1 and the veterans and recruits consolidated into the First Michigan cavalry later that month.)

“On or about June 16, 1865,” Sayles testified in 1881, “while on soldier’s duty [with the Sixth cavalry] he was in the act of harnessing a mule to a wagon, the mule becoming scared jumped over the wagon tongue and a rope that was attached to [the] mule’s neck and hub of wagon caught [Sayles] between it and wagon tongue in such a manner as to bend him backwards between the wheel and wagon-box, until assistant wagon-master George Bothwell came to [his] rescue and cut the rope, and from there [Sayles] was sent to hospital.”

And on May 4, 1888, William wrote to Mr. J. C. Black, Pension Commissioner in Washington, that after Lee’s surrender at Appomattox his Regiment “was ordered west and that while in camp at Ft. Leavenworth Kansas,” round June 15, 1865, “I was detailed to drive mules and that (against my own will) and that while in the act of harnessing one of the mules, I was hurt across the back and in the region of the kidney so much so that when I was helped loose that I could not walk or stand on my feet and was injured so that I was sent to [the] convalescent hospital at Fort Leavenworth and remained there about six weeks and was discharged” on August 17, 1865. In fact he was honorably discharged on August 8, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas.

After his discharge the Sixth cavalry William Sayles returned to Michigan and resumed farming first in Polkton, Ottawa County from 1865 to 1870, then in Vergennes, Kent County from 1870 to 1874 (actually living in Lowell village in 1870), in Berlin (Saranac), Ionia County from 1874 to 1876, and in Keene from 1876 to 1881.

By 1888 he was living in Lowell when he wrote to the Pension Bureau on May 4, 1888, continuing his efforts to be granted a pension for his war-related injury. He wrote of how needless his injury had been and yet how much he had suffered ever since.

Now I do not want to find fault but I thought that we should have been discharged after the war closed but was not and the result has been ever since my hurt as I have mentioned I have been impaired so much that I have been a great sufferer ever since and . . . as I grow older I grow worse and I have thought that in time will be unable to perform my labor and now the witnesses that saw the accident are dead as well as all of my company officers with the exception of my first Lieutenant and he was on detached duty at the time. My captain died at Grand Rapids about 4 years ago. Now I do not know as I am entitled to pension or not but Mr. Black if after hearing and reading these few lines you think I had ought to or am entitled to have a pension I wish you would write. I have thought of writing you a great many times for information.

He was eventually granted pension no. 507,485, increased in August of 1902, drawing $12.00 per month.

By 1890 the Sixth cavalry William Sayles was residing at 32 Quimby street in Grand Rapids where he worked for some years as a finisher; he was living in Grand Rapids’ Sixth ward in 1894 (as was another civil veteran Elias Sayles).

He was married twice or perhaps three times: first to Hettie Jane (d. 1895) on July 14, 1861; possibly to one Jenette (see 1870 census record) and finally, to Mary A. Smith (or Loveless) on March 21, 1897 -- but they were not living together in 1898. William had at least two sons, Charles (b. 1862) and Elroy (b. 1864). He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 2928) on September 26, 1899 (with no mention made of enlistment in the Third infantry).

William died a widower of “progressive paralysis” at the Home on October 17, 1906, and was buried in Saranac cemetery: lot no. WH-462.

Friday, July 02, 2010

Truman Sawdy - updated 12/31/2011

 Truman Sawdy was born on December 10, 1835 or November 10, 1836, in New York, the son of Ebenezer (1812-1890) and Ruth (Rose, 1820-1905).

Both New York natives, Truman’s parents were married in February of 1836, probably in New York where they resided for some years. between 1836 and 1844 they left New York and moved to Michigan. According to one source, “in the spring of 1842,” noted one source, Ebenezer “Sawdy came to Barry County [Michigan] traveling from the lakes on foot. He bought forty acres of wild land, then returned East and in the fall brought his family to their new home. He built a rude log house and literally hewed out a farm from the timber.”

By 1850 Truman was attending school with his younger brother James and living with his family on a farm in Woodland, Barry County. His father “eventually became the owner of considerable landed property and was numbered among the successful members of the community. He was the first mail carrier between Woodland and South Cass, and carried the mail tied up in a handkerchief. He was Justice of the Peace for years and in politics was a Republican. . . . The Sawdys are of English ancestry.” By 1860 Truman was working as a farm laborer and living with his family in Woodland.

Truman stood 6’1” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 25-year-old farmer probably living in Barry County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. Truman was on duty with the Regiment when he wrote to Mr. Nevins, editor of the Hastings Banner on March 4, 1862, from Camp Michigan, Virginia.

As I received a Banner to-day, I thought it could not be amiss to write to you and inform you, of the state of affairs of the Michigan 3d, and also of the brigade.


There is nothing transpiring in camp of any importance. Our boys are in good spirits now. The 5th [Michigan infantry] is suffering very much from measles, they have lost twenty men within three weeks, the sickness is abating in a measure. They have lost thirty-five men with disease since they came to Virginia. We have lost but twenty since the regiment was formed -- we have no reason to complain with a just God. His goodness and mercy has followed us all along. -- The Second [Michigan infantry] are in good spirits, also the 37th N.Y. (they are in our brigade); it is an Irish regiment, and they are a noble set of boys, they are called the bloody 37th, and I guess the Texan [sic] Rangers thought so, when they surrounded them at Mrs. Lee’s house.


The good news that we receive to-day, tends to keep up a lively Spirit among the boys. I have just come from dress parade, and we had orders to be ready to march. Everything indicates a forward movement. The roads are getting settled, and the weather is fine now, we have had considerable rain for two months past. I hope that the weather may continue to be fair, so that if we are called upon to march, that we may have a pleasant time of it; that is if we can. We soldiers do not expect to be carried upon flowery beds of ease.


Things are working admirably well now. A few more such victories as our men achieved at Roanoke Island, Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, and secesh are played out. I wonder what Northern traitors think now of the valor and bravery of our Northern troops. They can’t say now now that it will take five Northern men to whip one Southern man. . . . The Northern leaders are hauling in their horns a little, I think it is about time for them to do so. I understand that a great many Northern people are growing impatient; they say that this war has not progressed as fast as it might. I would say to such if they are not satisfied with the plans and operations of Gen. George B. McClellan, they had better come down and take command of the army, and see what progress they would make in suppressing the great rebellion. For my part, I am satisfied with his operations.


A word or two in regard to slavery. I hope and trust, that this war will put an eternal end to that “bone of contention.” Slavery is the greatest evil that ever befell any nation, and I trust that the people of the United States have learned a lesson that they will never forget for years to come. If any one wants to see what slavery has done for a state they can come to Virginia and not go any farther South. There is no enterprise, or intelligence about the people. -- Virginia is the oldest State in the Union and she has nourished and cherished that peculiar institution, until she is at least seventy-five years behind the times, so much for tolerating slavery.


I guess that I have nearly exhausted the subject, and will close. A Banner now and then would be thankfully received. The Hastings Boys are all well I believe. If you deem this worthy of your publication do so, excuse all the mistakes and oblige.

He was reported at Division headquarters, probably on detached service, in July of 1862, absent sick in the hospital in August, and in December of 1862 he was a Corporal and allegedly deserted on December 18 at Falmouth, Virginia. In fact, he was probably absent sick and soon returned to the Regiment on January 24, 1863, at Washington, DC. He was reported absent sick through April, in May he was listed in the Veterans’ Reserve Corps, he was on detached service through September and absent sick in October. Truman was officially transferred to the VRC on November 26 at Washington, DC, and was discharged on June 28, 1864, from Company E, Eighteenth Regiment, VRC.

Truman eventually returned to Michigan.

He was married to New York native Cordelia R. (b. 1846) and they had at least five children: Sylvia (1865-1885), Clara (b. 1868), Sarah Jane (b. 1869), Cora B. (b. 1874) and Jay (b. 1879).

By 1870 Truman was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Woodland, Barry County in 1870. (His parents were also living in Woodland in 1870.)

Truman decided to quit farming and took up the study of medicine. By 1880 he was working as a physician and boarding with Dr. Warren Baker on South Jefferson street in Grand Rapids’ Eighth Ward; that same year he also reported as working as a physician and living with his wife and children in Reynolds, Montcalm County. Truman eventually settled in Howard City, Montcalm County where he worked as as a physician for many years. He was living in Howard City in September of 1885 when he became a member of the Old 3rd Michigan Infantry Association.


Truman’s daughter Sylvia died in December of 1885, in Grand Rapids, during a botched abortion, reportedly carried out by her lover  Harry McDowell. McDowell was tried and convicted of manslaughter and sentenced to 15 years in prison.

Truman was still living in Howard City in 1888, 1890 and in 1894.

In 1888 he applied for and eventually received a pension (no. 671951).

He was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 2370) on February 25, 1895, discharged on April 20, and readmitted July 23.

Truman died of heart and lung trouble at the Home on August 20, 1895.

His body was reportedly sent to Howard City for burial, and may have been interred in Reynolds Township cemetery, although this cannot be confirmed. (According to the cemetery records for Reynolds township posted online he is buried alone with what is probably a government marker noting he was a sergeant in Company E, 18th VRC. There are quite a few Sawdys buried in Woodland cemetery, Barry County, including Truman’s parents and some of his siblings and at least one of his children.)

In September of 1895 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 422614).