Monday, February 28, 2011

William Wallace Wade

William Wallace Wade was born in 1841 in New York, the son of Moses M. (b. 1818) and Jemima A. (Tyler, 1815-1864).

New York natives Moses was possibly living in Farmersville, Cattaraugus County, New York in 1840. In any case he and New York-born Jemima were probably married in New York sometime before 1841. By 1850 William was living with his parents and younger sister Mary on a farm in Cherry Creek, Chautauqua County, New York; next door lived the family of W. Wade, possibly Moses’ brother. (Moses owned some $1600 worth of real estate that year.) Moses and Jemima eventually left New York and moved west. By 1860 Wallace was working as a school teacher living with his family in Lebanon, Clinton County where his father worked as a farmer. (Curiously, Oren Wade was probably living in Chautauqua County, New York in 1860.)

“Wallace” was 20 years old and residing in Clinton County when he enlisted in the Band on June 10, 1861. He was discharged on August 13, 1862, as “a member of the Band and not as a musician.” He served subsequently in the Brigade Band.

It is not known if William returned to Michigan after he left the army. By 1870 he was living with his mother’s brother, a wealthy farmer named Martin Tyler (b. 1804) and his wife Sally (b. 1811) and working as a school teacher in Stafford, Genesee County, New York; next door lived a 41-year-old wealthy farmer named Warren Tyler (possibly his cousin). Martin owned more than $7000 worth of real estate and Warren owned some $23,400 worth of real estate. (William’s father was living in Clinton County in 1870.)

William was probably married to New York native Frances (b. 1851) and they had at least one child: Tyler (b. 1873).

By 1880 he was probably working as a cheese buyer and living with his wife and children in Arcade, Wyoming County, New York. By 1897 he was living in New York when he applied for and received a pension (no. 984996). William eventually moved back west and by 1920 he was living on Fifth Street in Daughtery, Morgan Township, Murray County, Oklahoma; also living with his was his son who was apparently working as an agent for a railroad company.

William died on September 26, 1921, in Oklahoma, and was presumably buried there.

Sunday, February 27, 2011

Orin Dwight Wade

Orin Dwight Wade was born in 1839, possibly in Ohio, the son of Jonathan C. (1813-1895) and Margaret (Stevens or Stivers, 1811-1883).

Orin’s father was born in New York and his mother in Pennsylvania and they were probably married sometime before 1839. His family eventually settled in Ohio by possibly 1839 and certainly by 1845. His father probably brought the family onto Michigan sometime afterwards. By 1860 Jonathan and Margaret were probably living in North Shade, Gratiot County. It is possible that Orren was the same Oren Wade who was working as a farm laborer for the David Abot family in Villanova, Chautauqua County, New York in 1860. (Curiously, William Wade’s family was living in Chautauqua County, New York in 1850.)

Orin was 22 years old and probably living in Ionia County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.) In April of 1863 Orren was reported as a bugler and on furlough -- although the reasons are unknown.

In any case, Orin eventually returned to the Regiment and was wounded severely in the right shoulder and chest on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, where the Regiment was engaged at the Peach Orchard, and died the following morning in the First Division, Third Corps hospital.

Charles Price of Company G described Wade’s death in a letter home.”Early in the forenoon,” wrote Price on July 30, “our Regt was then near the front supporting the skirmishers; he was Corp[oral] and one of the color guard. Our company was next to the colors [and] he was struck by a piece of shell near the right shoulder blade; it cut his back and lodged in his lungs. He said that he could not live; he spoke of his folks [and] said that it would kill his mother. He seemed to worry more about his folks than he did [about] himself. He said that he was willing to die if that was to be his fate. He wanted me to write to his folks and send his memoranda home. I helped put him on to a stretcher but did not take his book. He was carried to the rear and died the next morning. I did not see him after he was put on the stretcher.”

Orinn was originally buried on Lewis A. Bushman’s farm, in the field near the barn but subsequently reinterred in the Michigan plot, Gettysburg National Cemetery.

In 1884 his father remarried one Mary Thayer Chapman (b. 1817) in Oceana County, and by 1889 was living in Michigan when he applied for and received a pension (no. 274830).

Saturday, February 26, 2011

Charles H. Vosburgh

Charles H. Vosburgh was born in September of 1842 in Jefferson County, New York, the son of Ephraim (b. 1813) and Lodena (b. 1824).

New York natives Ephraim and Lodena were married, presumably in New york where they lived for many years. By 1850 Charles was attending school with his two siblings and living with his family on a farm in Lyme, Jefferson County, New York. By 1860 Ephraim had settled his family in Michigan and was working as a farmer (he owned $2000 worth of real estate) in Bingham, Clinton County. By 1860 Charles was a day laborer living with and/or working for a wealthy carpenter by the name of C. E. Dodge in Lansing’s Second Ward.

Charles stood 5’7” with gray eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 20 years old and possibly living in Lansing, in Ionia County or Clinton County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was absent sick in the hospital from July of 1862 until he was discharged for aphonia (loss of voice) on April 22, 1863, at Emory hospital in Washington, DC. According to the discharging physician he suffered a “complete loss of voice of one year and 8 months standing [and that] he has been off duty for nine months, and has been in Carver hospital [in Washington] five months.”

After his discharge Charles returned to Michigan where he reentered the service in Company B, Fifth Michigan cavalry on December 30, 1863, at Pontiac, Oakland County for 3 years, crediting Holly, Oakland County, and was mustered the same day.

He married New York native Marsilva (1838-1902), probably in January of 1864 before leaving to join his Regiment in February of 1864 at Stevensburg, Virginia. They had at least six children: Charles A. (b. 1865), Hollis O. or William (b. 1868), Lena M. (b. 1872), Bart B. (b. 1877), Bertha (b. 1882) and Howard (b. 1884).

Charles rejoined his regiment and was probably on duty when his regiment participated in Kilpatrick’s raid on Richmond in late February and early March of 1864, during the movements from the Rapidan to the James river, then Todd’s Tavern and the Wilderness and Sheridan’s raid to the James river, all in early May. Charles was taken prisoner on June 12, 1864, at White House (or perhaps Trevillian Station), Virginia, and was eventually paroled and reported to Camp Chase, Ohio on May 12, 1865, as a paroled prisoner-of-war, where he was honorably discharged on June 23, 1865. (He may also have served in Company B, First Michigan cavalry.)

After the war Charles returned to Michigan and eventually settled in Fenton, Genesee County. By 1870 he was working as a painter and living with his wife and children in Fenton village; next door lived his younger brother Byron who was also a painter. His father was also living in Fenton and working as a carpenter. Charles was working as a painter and living with his wife and children in Fenton in 1880; next door lived his parents. He was still in Fenton in December of 1884 when he became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and in 1885. By 1890 he had moved to Detroit’s Tenth Ward, and was living in Detroit’s Fifteenth ward in 1894 and living in the Sixth Ward in 1900; for many years he worked as a painter.

In 1879 he applied for and received a pension (no. 285628).

Charles was probably living in Fenton when he died a widower of Bright’s disease on September 19, 1916, in Fenton and was buried in block D (section no. 4), Oakwood cemetery, Fenton.

Friday, February 25, 2011

William Von Wagner

William Von Wagner was born in 1829 in Braunschweig, Brunswick, Germany.

William was married Wurtemberg native Catherine (b. 1826) and they had at least two children: Mary (b. 1851) and Martin (b. 1859. William was living in Wurtemberg in 1851 and 1859, but eventually he and Catherine left Germany and immigrated to America, settling in western Michigan sometime before the war broke out. (He may have been living in Detroit’s Fourth Ward in 1860.)

He stood 5’6” with blue eyes, brown hair and a dark complexion and was a 32-year-old cigar maker probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (Company C was made up largely of German and Dutch immigrants, many of whom lived on the west side of the Grand River in Grand Rapids. This company was the descendant of the old Grand Rapids Rifles, also known as the “German Rifles,” a prewar local militia company composed solely of German troopers.)

“William” was reported AWOL in August of 1862 and was tried by a court martial in September for having deserted for 12 days while the regiment was on the march to Centreville, Virginia. The regimental surgeon testified that he was sick with piles and had given him a ‘straggling pass.” He was found not guilty.

William was in the Regimental hospital in October. By April of 1863 he was sick in the Division hospital where he apparently remained through May, and was again sick in the hospital in August. He apparently recovered his health, however, and reenlisted on December 21, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Grand Rapids. William was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

He was shot in the left side on May 12, 1864, at Spotsylvania, Virginia, admitted to Douglas hospital in Washington, DC on May 16, and was transferred to Summit House hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on May 27, listing Charles Houbel (also of Company C) as his nearest relative. He was still hospitalized when he was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and remained absent wounded through April of 1865. He was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

He apparently returned to Michigan.

In 1870 William was working as a laborer and living with his wife and two children in Detroit’s Fourth Ward in 1870. William was still living in Detroit in 1880. He was living in Detroit around 1893 when he provided an affidavit in the pension application of Rolandus Freet who had also served in Company C during the war.

In 1868 William applied for and received a pension (no. 174808).

William reportedly died in Detroit and was buried in Elmwood cemetery.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 239970).

Thursday, February 24, 2011

Maximillian Von Krout

Maximillian Von Krout was born in 1837, probably in Germany.

Max immigrated to the United States and by the spring of 1861 was living in Grand Rapids where he was teaching German as well as French (“for ladies”). Apparently there were public allegations that same spring, at least within the local German community, that Von Kraut was less than patriotic.

On April 30, 1861, the Grand Rapids Enquirer reprinted the following letter to the editor from von Kraut. “Being informed that there are some parties, not known to me, who are misrepresenting my sentiments in regard to the present state of the country, allow me to say to the public, that so long as I shall have the honor to call the U. S. my home, I shall follow the banner of this glorious country wherever necessity calls, and help to defend the beloved Union. My arm shall not be the last that will draw the sword to fight for the maintenance of the glorious Stars and Stripes.”

Follow the banner he did. Max was 24 years old when he enlisted as First Lieutenant in Company C on May 13, 1861. In a description of the departure of the Third Michigan from Detroit for Washington, the correspondent for the Detroit Free Press wrote from Cleveland, Ohio, on June 14, 1861, that

After the excitement and confusion of parting was over, the scene was varied, and interesting; here and there upon the deck were groups of men, some discussion the beauties of a moonlight evening upon the water, others the probability of a return to the good old shores of Michigan and the ‘girls they left behind them,’ while others, of a more musical turn of mind, crowded around the piano in the cabin to listen to the very creditable performance of Lieutenant Max von Kraut, of company C. Thus the evening passed away until about 11 o'clock, when the fatigue and labors of the past two or three days -- during which time most of the soldiers had enjoyed but very little sleep -- began to tell upon their physical powers and to suggest the necessity of a little of ‘nature's sweet restorer.

On June 24 the Free Press correspondent wrote from Camp McDowell on Georgetown Heights, DC that “Scouting parties are now sent out every night to reconnoiter in the enemy's territory. Last night company C, Captain [Adolph] Birkenstock, went out, and Lieutenant Kraut captured a large secession watch dog; after much persuasion and entreaty, he was induced to take the oath of allegiance and is now the guest of the Lieutenant.”

Max was promoted to Captain in July of 1861 following Captain Birkenstock’s resignation and was commissioned as such August 1. He resigned on November 10, 1861, on account of disability.

There is no further record and no pension seems to be available.

Wednesday, February 23, 2011

George W. Veley

George W. Veley was born in 1836, possibly in Wayne County, Michigan, the son of John (1817-1891) and stepson of Amanda (1831-1879).

By 1860 George was working as a farm laborer and living with his father John and Amanda in Livonia, Wayne County.

George stood 5’10” with gray eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was 25 years old and possibly a mechanic living in Wayne County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. He was discharged on December 7, 1861, at Fort Lyon, Virginia, for aphonia (loss of voice), a consequence of tuberculosis.

George probably returned to Michigan after his discharge, possibly to his family’s home in Plymouth, Wayne County, where he was living when he reentered the service as a Private in Company C, Twenty-fourth Michigan infantry, on January 4, 1864, and was mustered the same day. (Abraham Veley, possibly a younger brother or cousin, had enlisted in Company C in 1862.) George joined the regiment on February 17 near Culpeper, Virginia.

He was wounded on June 3, 1864, at Cold Harbor, Virginia, and was transferred to a hospital in Washington, DC.

George died of his wounds on July 20, 1864, and his body was returned to Michigan and he was buried in Riverside cemetery, either GAR section or section T, lot 21, Plymouth, Wayne County, Michigan. (Cornelius Veley, who died in 1869, served in Company I, Twenty-fourth Michigan is also buried in Riverside with John and Amanda Veley.)

Tuesday, February 22, 2011

George Vanderpool

George Vanderpool was born on September 7, 1840, in Benson, Hamilton County, New York, the son of Sophia (Van Heusen).

George left New York and moved west, and may have settled in Muskegon, Muskegon County, Michigan, as early as 1857 and worked as a clerk for Ryerson & Hill & Co. George worked a year or so for Smith & Odell, for William Morton, possibly for Rice & Morris, and possibly for William Martin. By 1860, however, he had returned to New York and was probably working as a laborer and living with the Gradley (?) family in Bleecker, Fulton County.

George stood 5’8” with brown eyes and hair and a florid complexion. (His prison record of February of 1870 describes him as a male with “white/light complexion, 5’8’’, auburn hair, slightly gray, large round blue eyes” with a “high full forehead, prominent roman nose, small fine mouth, full lips,” and a small chin.) He was 20 years old and working as a laborer in Muskegon when he enlisted with the consent of the Justice of the Peace in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties.) George was reported on detached service in October of 1862, sick in the hospital in November of 1862 and again in January of 1863.

George was discharged on February 5, 1863, at Third Corps hospital, Fort Lyon, Virginia, for “inguinal hernia of the left side brought on by straining while carrying a log in January 1862.” George claimed in 1863 that “While on duty with his regiment at Camp Michigan” in January of 1862, “and while carrying a pole to build a cook shanty he stepped and fell and the pole falling on him produced a rupture on the left side. By [using] a truss he was able to and did do duty from that time till about the middle of September 1862 when his rupture became so aggravated and painful that he could not do duty any longer and went into the hospital October 11, 1862.”

Some years later George testified that “The soil being wet and slippery after a frost, while carrying a heavy oak pole I fell with the pole across me injuring me internally and this was the starting point of my hernia on the right side.” Throughout the spring and summer, during the Peninsula campaign he wore a truss. However, he stated, “it was imperfect and in marching with belt - cartridge box - knapsack etc. my truss became misplaced and my hernia was so sore and inflamed as to cause sickness at the stomach. That day seventeen of my company of twenty-six were killed or wounded, and the action heated up my blood, and a very heavy rain followed toward evening (of the same day, and near the spot where General Phil Kearny met his death). I took a severe cold and next day Surgeon Grove . . . had me loaded into an ambulance and taken to Camp Fisher near Alexandria.”

According to First Lieutenant Thomas Waters, formerly of Company H, in his pension affidavit for Vanderpool, “While in the line of duty with his Regiment at Camp Michigan, Virginia and while carrying a pole to build a cook shanty, he slipped and fell and the pole falling on him produced a rupture on the left side. He did duty, however, after that as before as a true and faithful soldier and was engaged in the battles of Bull Run, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, Gaines Mill, Savage Station, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill and the two battles of Bull Run. By the hardships incident to all these battles his rupture became so bad that he could not do duty longer being unfitted for military duty and from earning his living at manual laborer. His case is a very meritorious one and deserving of a pension.”

Curiously, however, several years later Waters had a somewhat different opinion of Vanderpool. When Vanderpool was on trial for murder in 1870, several former members of Company H testified for the prosecution claiming that Vanderpool’s reputation for “honesty, integrity and humanity” among his comrades in the company, was bad. Waters was asked by the prosecution if he had “the means of knowing what the reputation of Vanderpool [was] among his associates in the regiment for honesty, integrity and humanity?” Mr. Hughes, for the defense, “objected to this, claiming that reputation in the community where the person resided, among his neighbors, was what must be proved. The objection was overruled and exception taken. The witness then answered that he knew Vanderpool’s reputation, and that it was bad. He was not cross-examined.”

Sam Murray, another former member of Company H, testified that “Vanderpool’s reputation among his military associates . . . for honesty, integrity and humanity . . . was not first-rate.” Murray also said that to the best of his knowledge Vanderpool had never fired his musket, and that he “used to see him scuffle with the other soldiers; never noticed much about his strength.” Once again, the defense “objected to the testimony and exception to the Judge’s ruling by which it was admitted.” The prosecution argued “that they proposed to show that Vanderpool’s reputation was not only bad, but that he had never, while in the service, been in an engagement or fired a musket in the army.” Under cross-examination the James Van Arman for the defense, Murray said that he

was not in command of the company at the battle of Fair Oaks; I was in the battle. Vanderpool was not in the battle, I think. James Lebel [Lavelle] was killed in that battle. I do not think Vanderpool was in that battle by Lebel’s side. Layman [Lyman] Lull was wounded in that battle; I cannot remember that Vanderpool was in that battle and helped carry Lull from the field. I was in the last battle of Bull Run [Groveton or Second Manassas]; James [William] Ryan was shot there; Peter Archer was missing in that battle; don’t remember that Vanderpool was in that battle; don’t know that he was not in the second battle of Bull Run; don’t know that he was not in the battle of Fair Oaks. He was a member of the company at the time of both battles. At the siege of Yorktown our company were under cannonading fire, not much else, I believe. I have known Vanderpool at Muskegon since the war. His general reputation there was good. I remember a skirmish at Aquia Creek in which our company was engaged; I was not in it. While Vanderpool was a member of the company it was in the battles of first Bull Run, the skirmish at Aquia Creek, the siege of Yorktown, Williamsburg, Fair Oaks, White Oak Swamp, Malvern Hill, etc. I don’t know that he was absent from any one of these battles. I don’t know that he was absent from the company from the time he joined it until he was discharged, a single day except in hospital.

Question: Where in was his reputation not first rate?

Answer: We used to call it “cramping on the sutler” -- used to get things without paying for them.

Question: Which do you think were the most honest, the sutler or the soldiers?

Answer: The soldiers generally, I think.

Redirect: I heard it said that several of the men were engaged in getting things from the sutler; sometimes by means of forged order and sometimes by “reaching for things.”

William Ryan, also formerly of H company and from Muskegon, then swore under oath that he knew Vanderpool’s reputation among his associates to be bad. Under cross-examination, Ryan stated that he believed George had been “borne on the rolls of the company for a year and eight or ten months, but he was about in the hospital most of the time; he was discharged from the hospital. I think about eight or ten months. I can’t say how long he was in hospital; I think about eight or ten months; he was absent from the company two months. I was absent from the army from wounds 30 days. I was wounded in the second battle of Bull Run; Vanderpool was not in the battle of Bull Run. I have no recollection of scolding Vanderpool on the Centreville heights for making coffee in certain way and being late. He was not in action. I heard it remarked that he had forged orders on the sutler and taken some bottles of wine and canned fruit. His general reputation in Muskegon is good. Can’t say who I heard say that he had forged orders on the sutler.”

Following his discharge from the army George returned to Muskegon where he lived for several years, boarding with and working for John Rudiman. He married Helen Mary Case (1846-1926) on August 11, 1868, in Mayfield, Fulton County, New York, and they had two children: Fred Case (b. 1872) and Dora Anna (b. 1880).

George and Helen moved to Manistee, Manistee County in November of 1868. Shortly after moving to Manistee George entered into a banking business partnership with a young man by the name of Herbert Field who provided much if not most of the capital for the venture.

On September 5, 1869, Herbert Field disappeared, and after about one week Vanderpool was arrested on suspicion of having murdered his partner. On September 17 Field’s body was found on a Lake Michigan beach about 28 miles north of Manistee, and it was deduced that he had met with foul play. The body was brought to Manistee and, after a coroner’s inquest, Vanderpool was indicted for murder.

He was arraigned for the crime of murder on December 22, 1869, before the Circuit Court for Manistee County, and he pled not guilty. The trial commenced on February 1, 1870 and after thirteen days of taking evidence and six days of summing up by counsel, Vanderpool made his statement on the February 25 in which he continued to claim his innocence. The jury went out and six hours later returned with the verdict of guilty. On February 26 Vanderpool was sentenced to life in solitary confinement and was transferred to the prison at Ionia, Ionia County.

His counsel sought a new trial and his various friends in Michigan and particularly in Muskegon began to raise funds and clamor for another trial, arguing that Vanderpool had not received a fair trial in Manistee. The request was granted and a second trial was held in Kalamazoo, Kalamazoo County and Vanderpool was released from prison on May 9 pending his new trial. By early July he was reported in the jail in Kalamazoo village; his wife was also living in Kalamazoo village at the time. The trial commenced in Kalamazoo in late October and lasted until November 22, 1870. The jury failed to agree on a verdict, however, and a third trial was held in late August of 1871 in Hastings, Barry County, which resulted in his acquittal on September 14.

Following his release from custody he moved his family to Tiffin, Seneca County, Ohio . By 1880 George was working as a shoemaker and living with his wife and children on Clay Street in Tiffin, Ohio. They remained in Tiffin until 1884 moving to Kansas City, Missouri where they lived for a year or so. In 1888 he and his wife moved back to New York and settled in Mayfield, where he lived out the remainder of his days working as a farmer. In 1920 George was still living in Mayfield along with his wife and daughter.

He received pension no. 21,797, and was drawing $50.00 per month in 1922.

George died of myocarditis and arteriosclerosis on December 19, 1922, at his home in Mayfield and was buried in Mayfield cemetery.

His widow Helen applied for and received a pension (no. 93221).

Monday, February 21, 2011

Oscar Warren Van Wormer

Oscar Warren Van Wormer was born on September of 1834, possibly in Michigan. According to a family historian “his parents were immigrants from Germany and had been in this country 3 months when he was born.”

In 1840 there was one Oscar Van Wormer living in Shiawassee, Shiawassee County, Michigan. In 1850 there was one Oscar Van Wormer, b. in New York in 1813, married to Elenor living in Flint, Genesee County; and living next door was David Van Wormer, b. 1809 in New York, his wife Louisa, b. 1814 in New York, and their son Oscar, b. 1836 in Michigan.

Oscar was 27 years old when he enlisted in Company G on May 10, 1861. According to Frank Siverd of Company G, during the first battle of Bull Run, Virginia, on Sunday, July 21, Oscar was taken prisoner, along with one of the Shaft brothers (he does not mention which one) and Joshua Benson, all of Company G. They were captured, wrote Siverd, “by four rebel scouts; they discovered the boys, and they showing too much pluck to be marched into the rebel camp, let them go. It is presumed they made pretty good double quick time from that to camp.” He was present with the company through August of 1861 and was detached on “extra duty” as a carpenter at Fort Lyon, Virginia in September and October.

By the first of September Oscar had been was detailed as a teamster, was still absent probably on detached service in October and reported as a company cook in November of 1861 through December. Although he may have been absent sick in a general hospital from November 4. On February 11, 1862, in a letter to the Republican, Siverd described the winter quarters of the company staff, among which was the “lodgings” of Van Wormer. “No. 9,,” wrote Siverd, was called the “Cook Shanty. A log house covered with canvas -- a Virginia chimney and fire place built on the outside. Van Wormer and Wm. Clark presides over the edibles, and are in turn cursed by the majority of the company for not furnishing beef steak every day, when the department only furnishes it about twice during ten days.” He remained present for duty through the summer of 1862.

Oscar was listed as absent sick in January of 1863, and in February reported as having returned from desertion on February 24 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, when in fact he had been transferred to G Battery, Fourth United States artillery on December 24, 1862, at Camp Pitcher, to serve out the remainder of his enlistment. He joined the Regiment on March 4, 1863 at Fort Columbus, New York harbor, and was wounded on July 2 or 3, 1863 at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. According to a statement given after the war by Elijah Harness, also of G battery, Van Wormer was hit on the “head with a piece of bursting shell which struck him back of his left ear which prostrated him. I saw him while laying upon the ground”

He eventually rejoined the battery and was on detached service in January and February of 1864 at Whiteside, Tennessee from January 30, and discharged probably sometime in June of 1864.

Following his discharge from the army Oscar resided in Indiana for some years.

Oscar was married to Martha Josephine Jones (1834-1927) on December 6, 1868, at Pleasant Garden, Indiana, and they had at least three children: Ola May (b. 1869), Ella G. (b. 1876) and Emma Adelia (b. 1879.

He was living in Roaring River, Missouri in 1876, where he worked as a chair maker, and in McDonald County, Missouri in 1878. He was working as a blacksmith and living in Afton, Indian Territory (Oklahoma), Cherokee Nation from at least 1892 until his death in 1899.

In 1884 he applied for and received pension (no. 838,480.

Oscar died in the Indian Territory (probably Afton, Oklahoma) on July 14, 1899.

His widow applied for and received pension no. 530,555. In 1901 his widow was living in the Northern district of the Indian Territory, Afton. She was living in Zena, Oklahoma in 1927.

Sunday, February 20, 2011

Virgil B. Van Winkle

Virgil B. Van Winkle was born around 1847 in Manchester, Washtenaw County, Michigan, son of Rev. Peter (1816-1886) and Hannah (Dunham, 1825-1866).

Virgil’s parents were both born in New York and possibly married there. In any case, they left New York and eventually settled in Washtenaw County, Michigan by 1845 and in Medina, Lenawee County, by 1850 when Peter was working as a Baptist minister. By 1860 Peter (who owned some $5000 worth of real estate) was still working as a Baptist minister, and had moved his family to Albion, Calhoun County where Virgil attended school with three of his younger siblings. (In 1860 a relative of Virgil’s, possibly an older brother, Lewis, was working as a millwright and living in Manchester.)

Virgil stood 5’9” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 18 (or perhaps 16) years old and working as a farm laborer probably living in Washtenaw when he enlisted in Company K on February 8, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Muskegon, and was mustered the same day.

Virgil joined the Regiment March 1 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and was possibly absent sick when he was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and remained absent sick through July. He was discharged on November 6 or 10, 1864, near Petersburg, Virginia on account of being a minor (he apparently enlisted without the consent of his parents).

After his discharge from the army Virgil returned to Michigan, possibly back to some of his family in Manchester. By 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned $8000 worth of real estate) and living with Frances (b. 1849), George (b. 1852) and Jeannine (b. 1854) Van Winkle in Manchester. (In 1870 his father was living in Sheridan, Calhoun couinty.)

He was married to Mabel L. or Belle (1856-1924) and they had at least two children: Blanch (b. 1878) and an unnamed infant (b. 1880).

By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Manchester, and living in Manchester in 1890 and 1894.

He died in 1901, presumably in Manchester, and was buried alongside his parents in Oak Grove cemetery, in Manchester.

In 1903 his widow was still residing in Michigan when she applied for a pension (no. 585920).

Saturday, February 19, 2011

Edward Van Wert

Edward Van Wert was born on November 19, 1839, in Groveland, Livingston County, New York, the son of Isaac (d. 1812) and Jemima Ann (Groesbeck, 1815-1844/48).

Isaac and Jemima were both born in Renssalear County, New York and were married at the bride’s home in New York in September of 1832. By 1844 the family had settled in Washtenaw County, Michigan where Jemima died in November of that year. According one report soon after the death of his wife Isaac left his children with relatives in Tyrone, Kent County, probably until the following year when he remarried a woman named Alemeda and they eventually settled in Bloomer, Montcalm County where they resided for about six months before moving to Hubbardston, Ionia County, living there for a little over a year and a half. By 1860 Edward (or "Edwin") was a mechanic working with his father and living with his family in Bloomer, Montcalm County.

Edward was 21 years old and residing in Montcalm County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861.

On May 29th he wrote his parents to let them know he was still in Grand Rapids, “They think we will start from here next week [the regiment left on June 13] but they don’t know whether we will or not.” In any case, he had to stop writing since it was time “to fall [in] for dinner now.”

Shortly after the regiment arrived in Washington, Edwin wrote home to tell his family how the trip had gone.

I am well and in Washington. We started from Grand Rapids last Thursday [June 13] and arrived at Detroit [at] four o’clock in the afternoon. We ate supper in Detroit that the folks gave to us. We was received by a mass of people. We marched through the city and back again to the depot and then we ate our supper and then we went on board the steamer Ocean and went to Cleveland and from Cleveland we went to Pittsburgh and from Pittsburgh we took the cars for Harrisburg and from Harrisburg we took the cars for Baltimore. We took the cares for Washington and from Washington we marched to the banks of the Potomac river where we are encamped. We are in the Dist of Columbia and Virginia is on the other side of the river. We expect an attack on Washington every day now. There is forty thousand men that can be brought here in an hour’s notice. The 2nd [Michigan infantry] regiment us encamped about 80 rods from us. I have seen Vance Bays [?] and Geragom [?] and John Sessions

We was received with cheers at every station [along the way]. I got five cards that the ladies gave me at Grand Rapids and it says on one of them send me a lock of Jeff David [Davis] hair.

When we came to Baltimore we expected an attack from them so we was ordered to load all of our guns. When we got there every one of us had our guns locked and primed ready if there had been anything done. We intended to pitch right in and burn the city but we marched through the city and they never offered to touch us. We passed over the same bridge that the secessionists burnt down and where they tore up the track. There is guards all along the track now.

Forty thousand of our men I meant when I said there was forty thousand that could be brought here in an hour’s notice. It may be long before this letter reaches you that I will be dead and buried for we expect an attack every day the other night when I was on guard about 12 o’clock at night there was some body shot at here. The ball passed on in a stump. There has other guards been fired onto there. Was one fellow wounded pretty bad. The whole camp lays with their clothes on every night and their guns by their sides ready at a moment’s notice.

I am pretty near done writing all I have to say is give me liberty or give me death.

Tell mother to remember me for I think of her very often.

By early July the regiment was still camped along the Potomac, although word was going around the camp that they would soon march over into Virginia.

I take this opportunity to write a few words to let you know how we get along. I am well and in good spirits for we got orders to pack up this morning to march over in Virginia. I hurried and got my things packed up and I sat down to write this letter [since] in twenty minutes we will be under march. It may be before tomorrow night we will be in battle for they intend to clear every . . . man in Virginia out before we stop. Hurrah for the Union. Give us liberty or give us death is our motto. This is what we have been waiting for this good while. If we do get into a fight we will be hard chaps to handle for we are all ready to fight. You can stand and look and you can see some a singing and some a dancing and some hurrahing for the union and others saying now we will have Jeff Davis and there is some running to get their things ready and the drums and fifes adds to the scene. It is quite a sight to see ten hundred men or more get ready for a fight. The most that troubles us is that we won’t come into action.

He then went on to explain to his parents how picket duty worked in the Army of the Potomac.

Last night I stood picket guard last night over in Virginia. The way we stand on picket guard is we start from camp with forty men and we march over in Virginia and after we get over there about one mile there is five men left wit orders to halt every body that comes along unless they have got the countersign which is different every night. Then after they leave the first five men we march one mile further where we leave five [more men] and so on till we are all gone. Last night I was one of the last ones left, five or six miles in[to] Virginia. About one o’clock we heard the tramp of horses feet and in about ten minutes there was about twenty horsemen came along on full speed. There was so many of them we concluded it would be unsafe to attack them so we let them go by but they had no more than got by before there was six men came along all armed. When they came within hailing distance we halted;ted them. When they turned and run like the devil we fired at them but our shots did not do much hurt, it only wounded three men and one of them got away but we have got the other two in the guard house. I don’t know what they will do with them.

Write soon and let me know how you all are. You need not be afraid that I will not get the letters for we have got a mail carrier that brings our mail wherever we be.

Shortly after the Bull Run disaster, Edwin wrote home and included a map of the recent battle and described the various places on the map. In another letter written around this same time, Edwin informed his parents that he had been sick recently. He also let them know that the regiment was encamped on Arlington Heights, that the weather was very warm, and that the regiment was “rested from our battle at Bull’s run and ready to go in another week [?].” he thought that perhaps they would march into Virginia within the next few weeks and anticipated that “The coming battle will [be] the greatest and bloodiest that was ever fought. It is there that a great many will find a resting place. But if I fall on the field I fall fighting for liberty. But I hope for the best. I would like to come home one more to see you all. Tell mother that I would like [to] see her very much. Tell Phylancy and the rest of the children that I remember them.”

In late October he wrote home to let his family know that he was well. he also expressed his sadness to hear that his father was ill and that he hoped “you will get well in a short time and I wish I was there to assist you in your work for you must have a great deal to do but we must trust in God and he will provide for all our needs. I was in hopes you would enjoy good health all of you but sickness will come and we must all have our share.” he added again to his father the admonition to put his trust in God. “and I hope you will get well . . . and get along with your affairs.” Edwin then expressed his sense of guilt over having left the family in the lurch so to speak. “I feel that I have gone . . . away and leaving you alone to do all your work. I fear that it is your working so hard that brought you where are are,” bedridden “But I hope you will look over my . . . leaving you seeing that I . . . fight and help protect you “ and the “people and above all we are fighting for what our fathers’ fought before us and that is liberty, sweet liberty.” He also informed his parents that the regiment had moved since he wrote last and they were now encamped “on Eagle Hill near Fort Lyon and about one mile from Alexandria.”

On the 15th of December he wrote from camp.

I take this opportunity to write you a few words to inform you that I am well and enjoying myself very well. The last letter I wrote you we was encamped near Alexandria but we have moved from there out about five miles towards the rebels where we are encamped now is a very pleasant place it is in the country and in the woods. I wish you was here. . . and see us where we are at present. It would be quite a sight for anyone to see that never saw encampments and the drums and fifes and bands and of the men the shanties [?] and huts [?] of the camp makes quite a sight. Then go down from the camp to the drilling field and see us drilling eight or ten thousand men marching in all shapes. One time we will be in a mass and the order will be given to deploy column and then . . . we will be in line of battle ready to [meet] the rebels.

And then go with me out on picket and walk my solitary beat at night and [there] comes a ball over your head. I am thinking you would not think it was very agreeable and then go with us on the battle field and see what you can see there. You can see some dying and some lying there . . . and you can really see that some killed . . . and then a little. . . farther and there you can see not only one but hundreds of them laying there, some dead and some just alive and crying for water and some will ask if you will not tell their folks that they died on the battle field and then some will lie there [sic?] leg broken or their arm or wounded in some way and they will plead for you to help them but that you cannot because you must stay in the ranks until you are shot down and you do not know how soon that will be for the balls whiz thick and faster but that makes no disappearance for we must keep on until one party or the other gains the victory and then go with me on the field of battle of the field after the battle and see I will not try to explain the [scene?] that presents itself to your sight you can judge for yourself.

And then after the battle is over comes the burying of the dead and that is a very sad task.

I want mother or Phylancy to make me a work jacket to help keep me [warm] and . . . ask Phylancy is she has received a little present I sent her or not.Tell mother that I think of her very often and tell the children that I think of them too.

He was present for duty from January through April of 1862. On March 2, 1862, he wrote home from the regiment’s winter quarters.

I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am well and enjoying good health. I received your letter dated Feb. 28th [?] and I was glad to hear from you and I was glad to receive a letter from Phylancy. Tell her and Mother and the children that I think of them very often. . . . You wished me to write and inform how the war is progressing here. I suppose you have received the news of the late victories of the union troops in capturing forts Donelson and Henry . . . and other places which I will not mention. The talk here is that the war will soon to come to a close. We are under marching orders at the present time that is the whole army of the Potomac is under marching orders. There will be in less than two weeks two hundred thousand men on the way to meet the foes of our country and if we are victorious in the coming battles which is about to be fought the war is to a close. But there will be a large number of us that will never come of[f] from the battle field alive. But if we fall on the field we fall fighting for liberty and I for one will stand by the stars and stripes till she waves over a free land. You wrote that you have plenty to eat but not much clothing to wear. I wish you had some of clothes that will be thrown away when we start on the march. I have got a good pair of pants and coat two pairs of shirts and drawers three pairs of shoes that I will have to throw away, and most all of the boys is in the way; there will be hundreds of dollars worth of clothing thrown away when we march.

We get our pay every two months. We get our pay the 15th of this month. We get $13 a month, or $26 every pay day. I was glad you had received my likeness. I guess you think it is one [ugly?] looking thing but you must remember that we are men no more for we are soldiers now.

I have nothing more to write so good by from Edwin Van Wert

Tonight on dress parade we got the orders to be ready tomorrow morning to march to the scene of action and it may be before this letter reaches you I will lay a cold and mangled corpse on the field of battle. But if I survive the coming battle I will inform you and if I should fall I leave my things in the hands of Lieut. [Solomon] Tumey the (2nd) Lieut of our company and if you don’t hear from [him] you can write and get information of Lieut. Tumey for he is going to stay in camp to take care of the tents and if you never find out anything about my things if I should not survive the battle, you can find out something about it when the regiment is discharged, for Lieut Tumey lives at Lyons, or Muir and you can find out by him. But all I have got that you would get for you would not get any clothing for they never bother with them. So I will state what I have got so you can tell whether you got it all or not . . . I have got $66.33. I have got some more but I will take that with me. Well I close for it is six o’clock and I must get ready to start tomorrow morning.

Edwin wrote home shortly after the regiment was engaged at the battle of Williamsburg in early May. “We are on our way to Richmond now,” he wrote, “and expect a battle soon and a big one if the cursed rebels don’t run again but thank God they can’t run much farther. . . . Tell mother that I think of her and think of her when I was on the battlefield.” He also “nclosed some papers that will show you how you can get my bounty money and land if I should get killed.”

Edwin was wounded in the fleshy part of one of his legs on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia. He was evacuated from the field shortly afterwards and, according to one Giles Broad, placed aboard the hospital transport Elm City which brought him to a hospital in Washington, DC. “He is in good spirits,” noted Mr. Broad, “and soon be on shore in hospital . . . God grant that he may soon be restored.”

Indeed, by June 11 he was a patient in Judiciary Square hospital when he wrote home to tell his parents that he had in fact been slightly wounded in the leg. “I take this opportunity,” Edwin wrote on June 11, “to write and inform you that I have received a light wound in the leg but it is getting along finely. There were quite a number killed in t our regt and still more wound ed when we were coming up in the boat to Washington there was a gentleman [who] wrote a letter for me to you informing you that I was wounded. I am in hopes you have received the letters. I have written back to the Capt. to send some money that the boys are owing me. I wrote and directed him to send it directed to you if it comes please keep it for me until I come home on furlough. I am coming home on furlough as quick as I get able to ride on the cars.”

His wounding had given Edwin pause, it seems. Although a religious man to some degree, it was only after he was shot that he actually noted a biblical passage reference in oine of his letters. At the end of his June 11 leeter he cited Hebrews 13:8, which says “Jesus Christ is the same yesterday and today and forever.” he then went on to add his own religious thought. “”Since I left friends kindred and home strange vicissitudes have befallen me but here is one friend who changeth not Blessed Jesus thou art infinite immutable of everything else. . . .”

At some point during the summer he was transferred to Cranch hospital in Washington. He was a patient there when he wrote home to his father on August 1.

Although he was reportedly hospitalized from July of 1862 through January of 1863, in fact he may have returned to the Regiment and was reportedly wounded a second time on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. In any case, he was in Cranch hospital in Washington, DC, when he dictated a letter home to his mother on September 1. “Here I am back again in the hospital with the loss of my left forefinger -- I have been in but one battle but it was a pretty hard one and I am thankful to be as well off while so many are suffering such agonies.I came in this morning with hundreds of wounded. We have had some reverses but our army is getting in position to wipe out all their injuries. We have avenged the battle of Bull Run and [no one] will ever call us cowards again. We hope this fight will settle the question but if not we will fight till they are subdued or annihilated.”

By November he had been transferred to the 16th Street U.S. general hospital in Philadelphia.

Sometime between the end of November and late February of 1863, Edwin was sent back to Washington and transferred to the camp for convalescents, near Alexandria, Virginia and by February of 1863 he was reportedly working as a teamster, probably for the Brigade wagon trains.

He was still convalescing in early March when he wrote home to let his famiy know that he had recently received a box of things his family had sent him. He “found it to be a good one and I found mother’s good old mince pie in the bottom. It is a bully one and the cake was good too. The box came good there was not a cake broke and the shirts was all right. I am a thousand times obliged to you for sending the box to me and I will try and repay you some time. I am getting better than U was and I think that I will go to the regt tomorrow. I am not able to do duty but I can go back to the regt while they are laying still and . . . they drill twice a day. I hope that I will stand it for Uncle Sam needs every man he has got for there will be some warm work in the three months to come.”

He then added that things were quiet in Virginia. “The army’s not doing much now for they are getting ready to make a general movement and then you can expect some news as quick as I get to the regt if I go I will write you a letter. Until you get a letter from me after you get this you had better not write for I would not get them. You can expect a letter from me soon. . . . Tell Rosalie that I will remember the raisins she got to put in the pie. In regard to the needle book that you say that Phylancy sends I don’t see it in the box. I am glad to hear that you enjoy good health. But I am sorry to hear that you are troubled with the ruhm [rheumatism?] and hope that you will get well of it.” He also included a sketch of the camp including a diagram of the arrangement of the huts , dimensions, etc.

He was still in camp on March 7 when he wrote home.

I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am here in this camp yet. I wrote you a letter the 3rd of this month and I stated that I thought that I would go to the regt but I don’t think that I will go in about two weeks. The Dr thought that if I went to the regt now that I would be taken sick again by being exposed to the cold and stormy weather, the kind we have here at this time. He told me that I had better stay until the weather became more settled and warm. I said in the other letter that I had received the box you sent and found it all that I could desire and I thank you very much for sending.

In regard to the Needle book that you said Phylancy sent and that I wrote I could not find in the box I found this morning . . . in the end of the papers and it proved to be a very good one indeed. Very handy and I am very grateful to Phylancy for taking such an interest in my welfare. I have got the one that you sent me when I was on Arlington Heights. I have got it yet and will keep it and if come home I will show it to you. Tell Morrison that he must grow fast and get a Big Man and Manda she be a good girl (which she is) and Rosalie I am very much obliged to her for the raisins she got for my pie, and Father I am very much obliged to you for the trouble you took to send me the box and the money you got to but in it and mother I am very much obliged to her for washing my shirts and sending them to me and that pie it was worth a thousand that you could get here. I am very thankful to you all for what you have done for me and the trouble it cost you and I hope the time will come when I will be able to repay you for your kindness toward me.

In the other letter I set down some of the prices here that is I mean in this camp things are cheaper at Washington or Alexandria and not much either. I wrote to you in one letter that the Lt sent me a letter and it stated in it that he had promoted me to a corporal for good conduct in the company in regard to doing my duty promptly.

You spoke in your letter that you would send me your likeness if you thought I would stay long enough in one place. If you would send them I think that I would get them before I left and if I don’t I have fixed it with the post office master to send all my letters to me if I go to the regt. So if you will send them to me I will cherish above anything else I would like to see how you all looked.

By the 17th of April Edwin had left the convalescent camp and rejoined the regiment. He wrote home to inform his family on that day that he was well and he also included a photograph of himself. And to chide his family for not writing more frequently (a ritual he would perform regulaarly throughout his correspondence with his parents). I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am well and . . . and hope that these lines will find you all enjoying good health. I have not received a letter from you yet that is since I left the convalescent camp. I have written three or four and have not received one from you. With this letter I send you my likeness. I thought you would like to see how I looked after soldiering two years. It may be that it will be the last time that you will see me. We are under marching orders at the present time. We would be on the march now but the weather is so bad that the artillery cannot move and we will have to wait until the [roads dry]. In regard to my likeness if you get it write and inform me what you think of the Soger Boy. It is not a very good one but as good as can be taken in the army for they cannot have very good accommodations for doing such business.

Edwin was among a large number of Third Michigan troopers who were awarded the Kearny Cross for their participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863. On May 27 he wrote to his father to tell him the news -- and to gently remind him to write more often.

I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am well at present and hope that these few lines will find you the same. I have not received a letter from you in a long time. I have written three or four since I have received one from you and I am anxious to hear from you. You said you would answer all the letter that I wrote and when I do not receive an answer I think there has something happened.

We came off from picket yesterday. We had a hard time going and coming. We have to go 9 miles on picket. We stay four day. Yesterday after we came from picket the division was paraded on over to the brigade parade ground and the badge of honor was presented to them that was most worthy of them. Genl Sickles and Staff Gen Birney and Staff Genl Ward and Staff Genl Graham and Staff Gen Haman and staff. Besides a large number of ladies was present on the occasion. There was three from our company that got them [Kearny Crosses] and I am pleased to inform you that I received a Badge of Honor and I know you had rather hear that than to hear that I was court martialled for cowardice. I feel proud to say that I never flinched before the enemy or left for the rear like a great many that I know. And I hope that if the time ever comes that I ever show myself a coward in battle that some [body] will shoot me dead. With this mail I send you a [paper] that was given to me for the purpose of sending home. In it you will find the list of the names that got them in the division and will see my name in Company E 3d Mich. It is spelled wrong. Went instead of Wert. I will close my letter saying I hope I never will dishonor the Badge I wear on my breast.

Edward was a Corporal present for duty with the regiment in late May of 1863.

By early August it was Edwin’s turn to reply to the charge that he had written home recently. On August 7 he wrote his parents,

I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am well. We are encamped at present at Sulphur Springs, Virginia. It is a very pleasant place. We have all the sulphur water we want to drink of from the celebrated Sulphur Springs. I received a letter from you dated July 29th and I was very glad to hear from you. You said that you had not received a letter from me in a long time.

But the reason why I did not write was because I did not have any paper or envelopes. And more I had not time when we was on the march. For then we marched all day I felt like laying down and rest my weary limbs. I wrote a letter the 2nd but I thought I would write this day if the other miscarried. . . . I cannot tell how long we will stay here. We may stay 2 months and we may not stay 2 days. But the opinion is that we will stay here until we get recruited up and rested. The weather is very warm here now. But it is not quite so warm as it was for we have had some cooling showers. In regard to health I never enjoyed better health than I do now and the army strength is very healthy and that is a big thing.

Tell mother and all the rest that I think of them all. In regard to our time it will be out the 11th of June 1864 and then I will see you once more if not but a short time.

In late August the Third Michigan was detached from the Army of the Potomac and sent north, first to New York City and then on to Troy, New York, to enforce the upcoming draft. The time proved a much-needed period of rest and relaxation for the “boys” and there were in fact no riots to quell. On August 26 Edwin wrote his parents,

I take this opportunity to write and inform you how and where I am. In regard to my health it is very good. We are now in New York City enforcing the draft. We started from the army of the Potomac the 15th and arrived in this city the 21st. We came by water. We embarked at Alexandria. We are stationed at present on Chambers Street one block from Broadway. The draft has went off all quiet so far. But there is some talk of a riot -- but they had better keep quiet for there is at present about 35,000 troops in the city all old [i.e. veteran] troops and they are all from the west and I am thinking that they would find a hard time if they make any disturbance. I have not received a letter from you since we left the army. I hope you will write as soon as you get this. The opinion is here that if Charleston falls the war is about closed. The talk is that they are going to send the troops that is here to [Virginia?] as soon as the draft is over. . . . We have a bully time here. I have been nearly all over the city.

And on September 2, he wrote home that “we are in Troy. We left New York the 29th Aug. We went up the old North river [?] . . . We are stationed in the Court House Square. We are here to enforce the draft. I was looking in the city directory and found a man by the name of Nicholas Van Wert. He lives on Pitt [?] Street in Lainsburg [?]. I have not been up there yet but I guess I will. Today I saw a man that said he knew lots of Van Werts in Pittstown [?]. We are stationed on Congress Street in the Court House Square. We board at Carpenter’s Hotel and we have bully [?] food [?] and all we want to eat. I don’t know how long we will stay here. In the letter I wrote before this I wrote to have you send me some money. I hope you will send it as quick as you can, If you have not sent it yet please direct to Washington then; it will come wherever I am. . . .Give my respects to mother.

By the end of September the regiment had returned to Virginia and was encamped near Culpeper. On September 22 Edwin wrote “We left Troy about a week ago and now we are in the army of the Potomac and expect a battle soon [and] it will be a hard one. The talk is here that peace will soon be declared. We was in New York and Troy and had the best of rations. But now we will have to come to hardtack again. The talk is now that our regt. will be converted into a mounted regt. to be called the 2nd Mounted Rifles; if they do so we will stay 3 years longer but we are not obliged to [re]enlist. Our time is out the 10th of June 1864. I think I will enlist for three years more. I received from you $5.00 which I am very much obliged. I was sorry to hear that you was sick and hope you will soon recover. I send my respects to the family [and] please give my respects to all inquiring friends.”

By October of 1863 Edwin was reported as a Corporal and sick in the hospital. Indeed, sometime between the end of September and October he was taken ill, although the cause remains unknown. In any case, he was in Fairfax Seminary hospital when he wrote home on November 11. “I expected to go to the regt before this but I think I shall be able to return soon. I have not received a letter fro you since the one informing me that you had sent me a box. In regard to the box I am very much obliged to you for sending it for it done me a great deal of good. But I wish you would write as quick as you get this. You spoke in your letter that you thought of moving from Hubbardston. If you move please write and inform me where you go. I have not much to write. I send my respects to all and tell mother that I am very much obliged to her for the nice things she sent me.”

He remained hospitalized probably through January of 1864, and possibly returned to duty sometime in February. In any case he was back on duty by March 12 when he wrote home. “I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am well and hope this will find you the same. I recd. a letter from you last night informing me that you had recd. the fifty dollars I sent. I am glad it came through all safe. We have not got our pay yet but expect to get it soon and as quick as we do I will send all I can home for I owe some which I will have to pay and what I have left I will send. I am glad that you [are] all enjoying good health and I hope you will continue to do so. Tell Phylancy she must write and Mandy too and Bub and Rosy. Tell mother I won’t reenlist. I have received quite a number of letters from Mich since you left -- they inquire after your health and how you like it there. I tell some of them not very well.”

On March 19 he wrote to his sister Amanda, thanking her for her recent letter -- and added that he was going to fix her up with one of the men in his company.

I take this opportunity to write and inform you that your kind and welcome letter came to hand tonight and I was very glad to hear from you and to know that you are well. I recd. a letter from Phylancy last night and was very glad to hear from her and I wish you all would write often. I have not recd. a letter from Rosalie yet but expect one from her soon. You wrote a very good letter and I wish you would write often. You must have father let you write his letters for him for it will learn you to write. You compose a very good letter. Now I wish I could do as well. I am very glad you all want me to come home. . . . I send my respects to all of you. We have very good times here now. We have got good quarters and plenty of good things to eat. We have plenty of coffee and sugar, potatoes, dried apple, beans, rice, onions, salt pork, fresh beef and plenty of good soft baker’s bread. So you can see we won’t starve. We have been on picket three times and on sentry [?] duty [?] twice since we came back. We expect to have a fight about the first of May and if I get through all right I will see you all again. . . .You must excuse [the] poor writing and spelling for I am writing by candle light and cannot see very plain.

In regard to Phylancy’s beau she found on the cars [?] I hope he’s a smasher [?]. But I have got one for you. He is a bully little fellow and I know you would like him. [He] belongs to the same company that I do. He is going to write to you. But I would not answer it this time. He talks [about coming] home with me and then you can see him. He took care of me when I was sick. He stays in the same tent with me. But I am afraid the love that my little sister has got for her brother will be another’s when she sees the soldier I picked out for her. His name is Dwight Tousley.

On April 19 he wrote home to his parents to let them know that he was

well and enjoying all the comforts of a soldier’s life. I have just returned from picket. We were gone four days. We had a hard time for it was cold and stormy weather. We are under marching orders and expect soon to be on our way to Richmond. I have not recd. a letter from you in quite a while. In my last letter I wrote that I could not get my money to send home till next month but today I found a fellow that had some that he did not want to use at present and offered to send it to me so I got $30.00, thirty dollars, and I send it today by Express and as quick as we get pay I will send what I can after I pay what I have borrowed. I would like to send more but I cannot until we get our pay.

I send my best respects to all of you and mother. I hope soon to see her again and the girls. I will be very glad when I can see you all. I have some letters from Michigan and they inquire after your health and how you like it there. I will send $33.00 and I want you to send $1.00 in postage stamps to me.

This was quite possibly the last letter his family received from Edward before he was taken prisoner on May 5, 1864, at the Wilderness, Virginia.

On May 2 Edward wrote to a friend, Fred Tuttle in Maple Rapids, Michigan.

I take this opportunity to write and inform you that I am well and am still in Dixie’s Land. We are having quite pleasant weather now but we have been having some cold and stormy weather. We have moved from our winter quarters and now live in our shelter tents. We found it quite cold sleeping on the ground as long as the weather was cold and stormy but I think we will get along well enough now. I don’t have near as good a time here as I did while at home. I suppose you enjoy your sugar parties and I suppose you do your share of the kissing the girls. I hope you have not had the misfortune to burn your hand again and if you do I hope you will have Miss Lizzie [?] to comfort you. I think she makes a good comforter don’t you? I would not leave [?] if we was there now playing blind man’s bluff . I would be willing to burn my hand the next time for the same of being comforted. But I [don’t expect to see Mich again for New Jersey will be my future home and if you ever [?] see Lizzie which I have no doubt you will, please give her my best respects. We are under marching orders and expect soon to be on our way to Richmond and with the army in as good condition as it is and Genl Grant in command I think we will go through. Not without some hard fighting though and if we have the luck to take Richmond and I get through all right I will write and let you know all about it.

My folks are safe in Nine Land [?] and like it there better than they expected. They enjoy the best of health and their garden looks bully so they said in their last letter. If you deem this worthy a reply I shall be very happy to hear from you at all times.

Edward was transferred as a prisoner-of-war to Company E, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was confined at the prison in Florence, South Carolina on October 5, 1864. He was paroled at N.E. Ferry, North Carolina, on February 27, 1865.

He died on April 20, 1865, of chronic diarrhea at the hospital (probably Chesapeake) at Fortress Monroe, Virginia. He was reportedly buried in Hampton National Cemetery: grave no. 1442, although the cemetery has no record of his interment.

In 1882 Isaac applied for a dependent father’s (no. 294069) but the certificate was never granted.

Friday, February 18, 2011

George Van Ranschler was born in 1839 in Germany, the son of Jacob (b. 1810) and Catherine (b. 1816).

George’s parents were both born in Germany and the family immigrated to the United States sometime before their twin sons Jacob and John were born in 1842. By 1850 George was attending school with his younger siblings and living with his family in Bleecker, Fulton County, New York. Catherine remarried one Jacob Miller (born in France in 1811), and by 1860 George was working as a laborer and living with family and step-family in Bleecker, Fulton County, New York. (George Vanderpool was also working and living in Bleecker in 1860; Vanderpool would serve in the Old Third with George and in fact they were good friends, with Vanderpool corresponding with Van Renschler’s sister, presumably Mary.) Also living with the Millers were twins Jacob and John “Rennselear (b. 1842 in New York), sister Mary (b. 1844 in New York, brother William (b. 1845 in New York and sister Amelia (b. 1847 in New York), as well as numerous Miller children.

By the time the war broke out George was probably living and working in Muskegon, Muskegon County. (In fact, he may have followed George Vanderpool out to western Michigan.)

He stood 5’10” with brown eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was a 22-year-old teamster probably living in Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company H on May 6, 1861. (Company H, formerly the “Muskegon Rangers,” was made up largely of men from the vicinity of Muskegon and Newaygo counties. Interestingly, George did not join Company C, which was made up largely of German and dutch immigrants from the Grand Rapids area.) He was discharged on July 29, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia, for a deformity of the right foot previous to enlistment. George was a close friend of George Vanderpool also of Company H (they were both from Fulton County, New York), and Vanderpool often wrote to Van Renschler’s sister. Van Renschler even assigned to Vanderpool the authority to receive his pay and forward it on to him after he was discharged.

It is likely that George returned to New York following his discharge, where he reentered the service in Company E, One hundred fifteenth New York infantry on August 14, 1862, at Bleecker, Fulton County, New York for 3 years. He was mustered as Corporal on August 15, taken prisoner on September 15 and paroled the following day at Harper’s Ferry, Virginia. He was promoted to First Sergeant on November 1, and wounded in action on February 20, 1864, at Olustee, Florida, returned to duty and wounded again on August 16, 1864. George was mustered out on June 17, 1865 in Raleigh, North Carolina. He apparently also served in Company F, Seventh New York cavalry.

In 1865 George applied for and received a pension for his service in the New York regiments (no. 54027).

He was married to a woman named Louisa, and they had at least one child.

George died sometime before 1874.

In 1874 his widow Louisa Beach was listed as the guardian for a minor child of George’s when she applied for and received a pension for a child or children (no. 445114). In 1879 she applied for and received a widow’s pension (no. 445113).

Thursday, February 17, 2011

William Van Dyke

William Van Dyke was born on April 14, 1843, in Monroe County, Michigan, the son of Henry (1802-1855) and Eliza (b. 1805).

By 1860 Irish-born Eliza had moved her son to the western side of the state and William was a student living with his mother, working as a domestic (but with some $2000 dollars in personal property) possibly with the Barringer family in Crockery, Ottawa County.

William was 18 years old and probably living in Crockery or Kent County when he enlisted with his mother’s’ consent in Company C on May 13, 1861.

On April 6, 1863, William was tried by a general court martial at the Headquarters, First Brigade, First Division, Third Corps in Virginia.

The court then proceeded to the trial of Corporal William Van Dyke of Co. C, 3rd Regiment of Michigan Vols., who being called into court, and having heard the special orders commencing the court read, was asked if he had any objection to any of the members named in the special orders, toi which he replied in the negative. The court was then duly sworn in his presence by the Judge Advocate, and the Judge Advocate by the President of the Court, and Corp’l William Van Dyke of Co. C 3rd Rt of Michigan Vols., was arraigned on the following charges & specifications:

Charge 1st. Conduct prejudicial to good order and military discipline.

Specification. In this, that William Van Dyke, Corporal of Co. C 3d Michigan Vols, did when marching with his Co & Rt to the Division review ground, talk in a loud and boisterous manner, much to the hindrance of good order and military discipline in his company and that when ordered by his superior officer Lt. Theodore Hetz of said 3d Rt Michigan Vols to keep still, did reply in words or figures as following, “Generals can issue orders but they cannot make me obey them. I guess this is a free country yet, and we can talk as much as they please.”

This was near Camp Pitcher, Va., on or about March 26th, 1863.

Charge 2nd. Disobedience of orders.

Specification. In this, that Corporal William Van Dyke of Co. C 3d Rt Michigan Vols., when marching with his Co & Rt to the picket line, was ordered by his superior officer, Lt. Theodore Hetz of said 3d Rt Michigan Vols. to stop his loud talk and be quiet in the ranks, did refuse to obey said order, saying, “he wanted to be arrested and sent back to camp so he would not have to on picket” or words to that effect.

This at or near Camp Pitcher, Va., on or about the 27th day of March 1863.

To which the prisoner pleaded as follows,

To the specification of the 2nd charge, not guilty

To the 2nd charge, not guilty,

To the specification of the 1st charge, not guilty

To the 1st charge, not guilty.

The following witness for the prosecution having been called into court, and duly sworn testifies as follows,

Question by the Judge Advocate: What is your name, rank and Regiment?

Answer: Theodore Hetz, 1st Lt., 3d Michigan Vols.

Question by the J.A.: Do you recognize the prisoner present as Corpl William Van Dyke of Co. C 3d Rt Michigan Vols.?

Answer: I do.

Question by the J.A.: Will you make a general statement of facts in prisoner’s case, as to the matter contained in the specifications against him?

Answer: On or about Mach 28, while the regiment was marching to the picket line, the prisoner present . . . did talk in the ranks, against the officers. I told him to keep still. He said he would not. I told him I would put him under arrest. He said that was just what he wanted, that he would not then have to go on picket. Prisoner asked why don’t you arrest me. I then put prisoner under arrest and sent him to his camp.

Question by J.A.: Do you remember whether prisoner made use of the following language, “generals can issue orders but they can’t make me obey them”?

Answer: Yes, he did.

The prosecution was then closed. The prisoner made no defence.

The court then closed, after mature deliberation on the testimony advanced, the court finds the prisoner corp’l William Van Dyke of Co. C 3d Rt Michigan Vols., as follows,

Of the specification of the 2nd charge, guilty,

Of the 2nd charge, guilty

Of the specification of the 1st charge, guilty

Of the 1st charge, guilty.

And they do then sentence him Corp’l William Van Dyke of Co. C 3d Rt Michigan Vols., to be reduced in ranks and to forfeit twelve (12) dollars per month of his pay for six (6) months, and in addition, the court do sentence him to forfeit twelve (12) dollars per month for 3 additional months as punishment for his contemptuous & disrespectful behavior in presence of the court.

William was reported under arrest from June of 1863 through July at Division headquarters.

It is not known if he ever rejoined the regiment. He was sick in the hospital at Washington, DC from October 9 or 17, 1863, until he was transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps January 5, 1864, at Brandy Station, Virginia.

He eventually returned to his home in Crockery, Ottawa County where he worked as a farmer, possibly living with his family.

William died on January 27, 1867, and was buried in Crockery (also known as Ottawa Center) cemetery, Ottawa County.

No pension seems to be available.

Wednesday, February 16, 2011

James E. Van Dusen

James E. Van Dusen was born in 1833 in Pennsylvania.

James left Pennsylvania and moved west, eventually settling in western Michigan by 1860 when he was a railroad laborer living with and/or working for James House in Algoma, Kent County.

He was 28 years old and probably living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861.

James was promoted to Corporal and was probably a Sergeant when he was wounded on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. He was subsequently hospitalized probably until May of 1863, and was awarded the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863. He was a witness for the prosecution in the court martial of Elijah Warner who was absent without leave from the regiment during the battle of Chancellorsville. James was probably admitted to Emory hospital in Washington, DC, on January 25, 1864, and transferred to Satterlee hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania where he was mustered out in June on June 20, 1864, probably as First Sergeant.

It is not known if James ever returned to Michigan.

He was married to Mary F, and eventually settled in Illinois.

James probably died in 1880, and probably in Illinois. He was buried in IOOF cemetery, section 15, in Rock Falls, Whiteside County, Illinois. (Also buried in sec. 15 is one James S. “Van Deusen,” 1867-1884.)

In May of 1880 (?) his widow was living in Illinois when she applied for a pension. In 1884 his widow was living in Illinois, and, through Grand Army of the Republic Harvey Post No. 274, Department of Illinois, in Harvey, Cook County, Illinois, was seeking to obtain a widow’s pension. Her petition was eventually granted (no. 422170).

Monday, February 14, 2011

Charles Hamilton and James Henry Van Dusen

Charles Hamilton Van Dusen was born on May 20, 1840, in Scotland, Brant County, Ontario, Canada, the son of Abram (or Abraham or Abner, b. 1811) and Louisa (Malcolm, 1816-1853).

New York native Abram married Canadian-born Louisa in 1837 in Scotland, Ontario, Canada, where they resided for many years. Sometime after 1849 Abram brought his family to Michigan and by 1850 he was working as a physician and Charles was attending school with his older brother James Henry (who would also join the Third Michigan) and younger sister Cecelia in Detroit, Wayne County. Abram eventually settled his family on the western side of the state and by 1853 when Louisa died they were living in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. In about 1855 Abram remarried New York native Laura Robinson (b. 1813), and by 1860 he was practicing medicine in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. (He married his third wife Lucinda Newell in about 1861 in Michigan.) By 1860 Charles was working as a farm laborer and/or living with the Ira Robinson family in Robinson, Ottawa County.

Charles was 21 years old and probably living in Ottawa County or Muskegon County when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861 (he was joined by his older brother James in November of 1861). Charles was promoted to Corporal on September 20, 1861.

According to William Drake, also of Company A, Charles was in the hospital with an unknown ailment sometime in late March of 1862. He eventually recovered, however, and was promoted to Sergeant on July 20, 1862, and to Orderly Sergeant by February 10, 1863, when he left Camp Pitcher, Virginia, where the Regiment was encamped for winter, for Grand Rapids on a 15-day furlough. Indeed, He was home in Michigan during the winter of 1863, and rejoined the regiment in early March of that year. Charles was awarded the Kearny Cross for his participation in the battle of Chancellorsville, Virginia, on May 3, 1863. He was a witness for the prosecution in the court martial of Henry Parker who was absent without leave from the regiment during the battle of Chancellorsville.

Charles was Acting Sergeant Major in October of 1863 through November, and in December was on detached service in Michigan (probably recruiting) where he remained through March of 1864. He returned to the Regiment and was commissioned a Second Lieutenant on April 10, replacing Lieutenant George Hubbard, but was never mustered as such. He was absent sick in May and mustered out of the service on June 20, 1864.

Charles eventually returned to Michigan and by 1874 had settled in Midland County.

He married Michigan native Ida Cornelia Greig (b. 1857) on October 16, 1877, in Oakland County, and they had at least two children: Charles D. and Allie (b. 1879).

In 1879 he was living in Milford, Oakland County, and by 1880 was working as a grocer in Milford. He was living in Detroit at 37-39 Woodward Avenue in 1890, and at 61 Hendric Avenue around 1900 and he was still living in Detroit about 1905.

Charles was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and an active member of GAR Fairbanks Post No. 17, serving on the Relief and Employment committee in 1889, and as Post Sergeant Major in 1890. In 1879 he applied for and received a pension (no. 226982).

Charles probably died in 1906, possibly in Detroit.

In August of 1906 his widow was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 628778). In 1920 there was a widow named Ida Van Dusen, b. 1859 in Michigan, living alone in Fairfield, Lenawee County.

James Henry Van Dusen was born on January 26, 1838, in Scotland, Brant County, Ontario, Canada, the son of Abram (or Abraham or Abner, b. 1811) and Louisa (Malcolm, 1816-1853).

New York native Abram married Canadian-born Louisa in 1837 in Scotland, Ontario, Canada, where they resided for many years. Sometime after 1849 Abram brought his family to Michigan and by 1850 he was working as a physician and James was attending school with his younger brother Charles (who would also join the Third Michigan) and younger sister Cecilia in Detroit, Wayne County. Abram eventually settled his family on the western side of the state and by 1853 when Louisa died they were living in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. In about 1855 Abram remarried New York native Laura Robinson (b. 1813), and by 1860 he was practicing medicine in Grand Haven, Ottawa County. (He married his third wife Lucinda Newwell in about 1861 in Michigan.)

James stood 5’8” with brown eyes, black hair and a fair complexion and was a 23-year-old farm laborer probably living in Muskegon or Spring Lake, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company A, joining his brother Charles, on November 12, 1861, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered on December 23 at Detroit. James was reported as a clerk at (presumably Brigade) headquarters from August of 1862 through September, and indeed, according to his pension application declaration of 1905, he “was detailed in General Berry’s Brigade headquarters as clerk at Yorktown,” Virginia (which would have been in the spring of 1862).

By the end of June of 1862 he was sick in a hospital in Bottom’s Bridge, Virginia, suffering from”fever, ague and debility. He was absent sick in November, and allegedly deserted on November 12, 1862, at Alexandria, Virginia, although he claimed in later years that he had in fact been discharged, presumably for disability, at Alexandria, Virginia sometime in October of 1862.

It is not known if James returned to Michigan after his discharge from the army.

He did however return to Brant County, Ontario, Canada, where he married Brant native Kate Malcolm (1846-1910) on April 7, 1863, in Brantford, and they had at least eight children: Charles H. (b. 1865), Alfred M. (b. 1867), Jennie L. 9b. 1869), Louis (b. 1870), Will W. (b. 1872), Stella (b. 1878), Mysta (b. 1879) and James M. (1881).

They settled in Scotland, Ontario where he worked as a druggist for many years. By 1906 he was still living in Scotland, but by 1912 he was reportedly living in Barrington, Massachusetts.

In 1905 his application for pension (no. 1,330,971) was rejected, reasons unknown, but possibly because the charge of desertion was never removed.

James was probably a widower when he died on February 12, 1918, probably in Brant and was buried in Scotland cemetery in Brant.

Sunday, February 13, 2011

Philip Van Deusen

Philip Van Deusen was born in 1841 in Michigan, the son of William (b. 1810) and Mary Ann (b. 1803).

New York native William married Canadian Mary Ann sometime before 1833 when their son James was born in New York. William moved his family moved from New York to Michigan sometime between 1833 and 1836, By 1850 Phillip was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Lowell, Kent County, where his father worked as a farmer. Phillip’s parents were still living in Lowell in 1860.

Philip was 20 years old and probably living in Lowell when he enlisted as a Corporal in Company D on May 13, 1861. (Company D was composed in large part of men who came from western Ionia County and Eaton County.)

Philip was killed in action on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run. He was presumably among the unknown soldiers whose remains were reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.

His parents were still living in the Lowell area in 1870. In 1880 his father applied for a dependent father’s pension (no. 265979), but the certificate was never granted.

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Chauncey B. Van Deusen

Chauncey B. Van Deusen was born on April 17, 1838, in Horseheads, Chemung County, New York, the son of Walter (b. 1799) and Julia (Kent, b. 1800).

New York native Walter married Julia in October of 1829, probably in New York. Chauncey’s family left New York and came to Kent County, Michigan with his parents in 1848, and by 1850 Chauncey was living with his family in Vergennes, Kent County where his father, who was blind, was working as a musician. By 1860 Chauncey was a farm laborer living with his family in Vergennes where his father owned a substantial farm.

He stood 5’7” with hazel eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 23-year-old farm laborer probably living in Vergennes, Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on April 17, 1861. Chauncey was eventually promoted to Sergeant and wounded in one of his ankles during the battle at Second Bull Run, on August 29, 1862. “Sergeant Van Dusen,” wrote Dan Crotty of Company F after the war, “commences to hop on one leg, and says something that sounds like swearing, for he is shot in the ankle.”

He was subsequently hospitalized until he was discharged on November 1, 1862, at Hammond hospital in Point Lookout, Maryland, for chronic rheumatism and deafness. The discharging physician wrote that “The rheumatism severely affecting the spine, and causing lameness of the lower limbs, caused by cold taken on duty.”

Following his discharge he returned to Vergennes where he married Canadian native Jeanette McPherson (d. 1842-1925) on May 3, 1863, and they had at least five children: one who died in infancy, Clarence (b. 1864), Lillian (b. 1867, Mrs. Brown), Elizabeth (b. 1873, probably Mrs. Charles P. Beckwith) and William P. (b. 1876).

Chauncey reentered the service in Company G, Sixth Michigan cavalry on January 4, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Vergennes, and was mustered on January 11. He was on detached service in March, and taken prisoner in November. He was imprisoned in Libby prison at Richmond, Virginia, and spent eleven months in Andersonville. He was honorably discharged on June 14, 1865, at Camp Chase, Ohio.

After his discharge from the army Chauncey returned to his home in Michigan. He may have been the same Chauncey "Van Dusen" who, in August of 1866 bought out Lyman B. Lull’s interest in a tool factory in Lowell. In any case, by 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and two children in Austerlitz, Plainfield Township, Kent County. By 1880 he was still living with his wife and children in Plainfield and working as a farmer. By 1889 he was living in Rockford, Kent County and in Ionia County in 1890.

He became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in December of 1891, and was also a member of the Congregational church, presumably in Rockford. In 1880 he applied for and received a pension (no. 401533).

Chauncey died of “fatty degeneration of the heart” on March 7, 1911, at his home in Plainfield Township, Kent County, and the funeral was held at the Congregational church on Thursday. He was buried in Rockford cemetery.

In May of 1911 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 725194).

Friday, February 11, 2011

Charles Lewis Tyler

Charles Lewis Tyler was born in 1835 in Vermont.

In 1850 there was one Charles Tyler, a 33-year-old slate cutter, living in Vernont, Windham County, Vermont, with his wife and twin sons, Edson and Austin (7 months old).

Charles left Vermont and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan.

He was married to Ohio native Roxanna (1836-1926) and they had at least three children: Byron E. (b. 1857), John A. or Moses (1859-1889) and William A. (b. 1862-1958).

They settled in Michigan by 1857 and by 1860 Charles (listed as “C. Lewis”) was working as a clerk and living with his wife and two children in Lyons, Ionia County. (Also living with them was a seamstress named Rhoda Tubbs, age 18 and born in New York and one James Tubbs, age 48 also born in New York.)

Charles stood 5’6” with blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion and was a 29-year-old clerk living in Lyons, Ionia County when he enlisted in Company G on February 2, 1864, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day, crediting Campbell, Ionia County. He joined the Regiment on February 18 at Camp Bullock, Virginia, and was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. He was absent sick from July 19, 1864 through May of 1865, and discharged on June 5, 1865, at Washington, DC.

After the war Charles returned to western Michigan. By 1870 he was working as a glazier and living with his wife and children in Wayland village, Allegan County. In 1880 Charles was reported as working as a painter, married and living in Greenville, Montcalm County, and he was still living in Greenville in 1888 and 1890.

In 1888 he applied for and received a pension (no. 860683).

He may have died in early 1907, presumably in Greenville, and was buried in Forest Home cemetery: section 18 1/2, Greenville.

In April of 1907 his widow applied for and received a pension (no. 630372).

Thursday, February 10, 2011

Andrew P. Tuttle

Andrew P. Tuttle was born in 1841 in Ohio, the son of William (b. 1815) and Elizabeth (b. 1814).

Ohio native William married Welsh immigrant Elizabeth and they settled in Ohio for some years. His family moved from Ohio to Michigan sometime after 1849, and by 1860 William had settled his family on a large farm in Ionia, Ionia County; Andrew was a farm laborer living with and/or working for William B. Lincoln, a physician in Ionia just a few houses from his family.

Andrew was 20 years old and probably still living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861 (and was possibly relayed to A. Clark also of Ionia County and who also enlisted in Company D). By July of 1862 Andrew was reported as “servant” to Regimental Chaplain Joseph Anderson. He was listed as missing in action on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, was returned to the Regiment on September 7, 1862, and in October he was absent sick in the hospital. He apparently recovered and was transferred to the Second United States cavalry regiment on November 29, 1862.

Andrew was eventually discharged from the army and returned to Michigan. By 1870 he was working as a laborer and living with his mother with the Hanifan (?) family in Pentwater village, Oceana County.

Andrew was married to New York native Sarah (b. 1845) and they had at least two children: Andrew Jr. (1872) and Dorothy (b. 1885).

Andrew and his wife were living in Pentwater in 1872, and by 1880 he was working as a laborer and living with his wife in Pentwater. By 1885 they were probably living in Illinois when their daughter was born, but back in Pentwater, Oceana County in 1890 and 1894. Andrew and his wife eventually moved out west, and by 1920 he was retired and living with Sarah and their daughter in Vancouver, Clark County, Washington. Also living with them were Dorothy’s son and daughter.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association.

No pension seems to be available.

Wednesday, February 09, 2011

Adam Clark Tuttle

Adam Clark Tuttle was born in 1838 in New York, the son of Stephen (b. 1801) and Clarinda (b. 1810).

Canadian-born Stephen married New York native Clarinda, probably in New York where they lived for many years. By 1850 “Adam C.” was attending school with his siblings and living with his family in Batavia, Genesee County, New York. By 1860 Stephen had moved his family to a farm in Carmel, Eaton County, Michigan. In any case, A. Clark left New York and had settled in western Michigan by the time war had broken out.

He was 22 years old and possibly living in Clinton County when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861 (and was possibly related to Andrew Tuttle of Ionia County and who also enlisted in Company D). Clark was a hospital attendant in July and August of 1862, absent sick in the hospital from April of 1864 through May, and was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After he was discharged from the army Clark returned to Michigan. He was married to Ohio native Mary (1844-1913), and they may have one child: Jeannie (1865-69).

By 1870 he was working as a carpenter and living with his wife in West Windsor, Eaton County; and by 1880 he was listed as married, and working as a “saw mill man” and boarding with the George Southworth family in Potterville, Eaton County. By 1888 he was living in Ingham County, in Lansing in 1890 and Windsor, Eaton County in 1894. By 1920 he was living with his nephew Charles Tuttle and his wife Florence in Windsor.

In 1880 he applied for and received a pension (no. 250706).

Clark was probably a widower when he died of vascular hypertension on January 24, 1922, in Windsor and was buried in West Windsor cemetery next to his wife.