Wednesday, March 30, 2011

David J. Webb

David J. Webb was born in 1842 in Ingham County, Michigan, probably the son of Jane (b. 1820).

David’s parents were both born in England and immigrated to the United States sometime before their daughter mailtda was born in 1840 in New York. The family eventually moved west and settled in Ingham County, Michigan. In 1850 David was attending school with his older sister Matilda, and they and their younger sister Mary A. were living with their mother with the William Wright family in Aurelius, Ingham County. William Wright and his wife Mary, both aged 56 years in 1850, were also from England. Also living in Aurelius were William and Mary Webb, b. 1778 and 1779 respectively in England, and David Webb, born 1819 in England, and George B. Webb (b. 1802 in England) and his wife Lucy (b. 1815 in New York), and their family.

By 1860 David was an apprentice cabinet-maker working for Daniel Pucke, a cabinet manufacturer in Lansing’s Second Ward. David’s younger sister Mary was working as a domestic for the Enos Blanchard family in Aurelius.

He stood 5’7” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 18 years old and living in Ingham County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. He was wounded in the left arm and hand on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, after which he was hospitalized through September. He allegedly deserted on September 21 at Upton’s Hill, Virginia, and returned to the Regiment on October 3 at Upton’s Hill, but in fact was discharged on October 3, 1862, at Douglas hospital in Washington, DC, as a result of his being wounded which had caused a fractured “ulna and impairing greatly the use of arm and hand. . . .”

After his discharge from the army David eventually returned to Michigan. He was married to New York native Alice L. (1852-1939), and they had at least eight children: Charles (b. 1868), Murty (b. 1870), Carrie (b. 1872), Alice (b. 1874), Jane (b. 1876), William (b. 1877), Minnie (b. 1879) and a son J. D. (b. 1891).

He received a pension (no. 10294).

By 1870 David was working as a lumberman and living with his wife and two children in St. Charles, Saginaw County; his mother was living in Lansing in 1870. By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Brant, Saginaw County; also living with them were three boarders. He was still in Brant in 1888 and 1890, but by 1920 David was living in Chesaning with his wife and son J. D.

David was probably living in the vicinity of Chesaning, Saganaw County, when he was killed in an accident on June 4, 1936, and was buried in Wildwood cemetery, no. 2., in Chesaning.

Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Jacob B. Weaver

Jacob B. Weaver was born in 1822 in Franklin County, Pennsylvania.

Jacob left Pennsylvania and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He was a 39-year-old farmer possibly living in Montcalm County (or perhaps in Grand Rapids) when he enlisted in Company D on May 13, 1861. He was reported missing in action on June 1, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, but was returned to the Regiment on November 26, 1862, at Warrenton, Virginia. He was a nurse in the Division hospital in May of 1863 and a nurse at the hospital in Alexandria, Virginia from June through July.

Jacob had apparently returned to duty by the time he reenlisted on December 23, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Boston, Ionia County. He was presumably on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Jacob was transferred to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was killed in action June 18 near Petersburg, Virginia. He was first buried on the Henry Bryan property near Meade Station, Virginia, but reinterred in City Point National Cemetery: grave 2483.

No pension seems to be available.

Monday, March 28, 2011

George Weatherwax

George Weatherwax was born on December 3, 1822, in Peru, Clinton County, New York, son of Jacob M. (1792-1861) and Annie (Ketchum, 1793-1861).

New York native Jacob (he was born in Peru, New York) married New York native Annie sometime before 1822, and lived in Peru for some years; they were living there in 1833 when their son Henry was born. Sometime that year, however, Jacob moved the family to Orleans County, New York and in 1837 ir 1838 the family moved to Adrian, Hillsdale County. 1845 they were living in Scipio, Hillsdale County. They were still living in Scipio in 1850 where Jacob worked a farm.

George came to Tallmadge, Ottawa County in 1843 where he engaged in lumbering, owning and operating a sawmill in Lamont. By 1845 Jacob had his family in Scipio, Hillsdale County. He would eventually settle in Adrian, Lenawee County where he and his wife both died on December 1, 1861.

George eventually moved to the western side of the state and by 1850 he and his brother Benjamin (who would die during the war) were living with the family of a blacksmith named Henry Cline (?) in Tallmadge, Ottawa County. They were both also reported as living with the family of Richard Lewis, a laborer in Allendale, Ottawa County.

George married Hulda Ann Van Tassel in 1852 or 1855, probably in Michigan, and they had at least three children: Frank E. (b. 1856), Clarissa (b. 1858), Abbie (b. 1859), Leon J. (b. 1860) and Adele C. (b. 1867). They divorced around 1868.

In 1855 George was living in Georgetown, Ottawa County, where he owned some 320 acres, and where he served as Township Supervisor and Justice of the Peace. By 1860 George was a very wealthy farmer and lumberman and one of the larger landholders living with his wife in Georgetown and indeed he owned real estate valued at some $10,000. (Next door lived a farm laborer named Charles Parker and his family, and on the other side of his house farm lived the Levi Bement family whose son Wilbur like Charles would also join Company I, Third Michigan infantry.)

He was 38 years old and living in Georgetown when he enlisted as Captain of Company I on May 13, 1861. George recruited much of “his” Company from among the sawyers and laborers who had worked for him and other lumbermen in Ottawa County. In the latter part of May, Captain Weatherwax asked one of the County politicians, John Haire, to go to Allegan and recruit soldiers to fill out the maximum quote for his company, designated I, which was now part of the Third Regiment, then forming at the fairgrounds just south of Grand Rapids. The Allegan Journal reported that on Wednesday evening, May 29, Haire arrived in Saugatuck.

He came in the vocation of a recruiting officer for the above Company [I], in search of soldiers to go into immediate service. He had no difficulty in obtaining the quota of men assigned to him by Capt. [George] Weatherwax, the gentleman in command of Company I. This Company belongs to the Third Regiment, which was accepted some time ago, and will be mustered into the United States service at Grand Rapids next week. To hear through Mr. Hair that at the time when the Regiment was accepted, the companies which compose it were organized with their ranks filled up to eighty-three, the minimum aggregate, but as a majority of the companies have since been increased to the maximum aggregate -- one hundred and one, it was thought advisable by those in command to place Company I upon an equal footing with the rest of the Regiment; and, as a few additional names were necessary to fill out the muster roll, Mr. Haire was employed by the Captain [Weatherwax] to come to this place and enlist recruits. As soon as it was known that the mission of Mr. Haire to our town was to get men to fight and not to play soldier, the boys did not hesitate, but came up to the scratch, eager to sign the muster roll and be marching. Through the kindness of Messers. F. B. Wallin and John H. Billings, the boys were carried gratis to their place of destination -- Grand Rapids, the rendezvous of the Third Regiment, where they will be mustered into service, armed and equipped, and go into encampment either at Grand Rapids or Fort Wayne immediately. The boys carry with them the best wishes of all, and their friends and relations would unite in prayer -- God bless our brave young volunteers.

The Third Michigan left Grand Rapids on June 13, 1861, and arrived in Washington, DC, on June 16. They were engaged in covering the federal retreat from Bull Run, Virginia, on July 21. George resigned on October 19, 1861, on account of disability.

On November 27, 1861, Lieutenant Stephen Lowing of Company I and also from Georgetown, wrote home to his brother-in-law Franklin Bosworth, that he was “informed that Captain Weatherwax has conveyed the impression that it was my fault he resigned. Now I can hardly think that he has done so, but if he has, I would like to know it, that I may disprove it now in the time of it. He knows better and knows that I can assign the reason and prove them.”

Although he considered Weatherwax a fine man otherwise, Lowing held a rather low opinion of his superior’s military faculties. “It is not every good fellow,” added Lowing in his letter to Bosworth, “that can make a military man, and yet no fault of his, and that was the difficulty with Captain Weatherwax. As good a fellow as I ever wish to mess with, and as poor a Captain. He was as good a Captain as McConnell was Colonel. They fought each other, and killed each other's chances; and both left the Regiment together and for the same reason, leaving many friends behind them. Both are brave, to a fault, but neither could learn the tactics.”

Indeed, An officer serving with Company I observed McConnell’s clash with the Captain of Company I, George Weatherwax, that fall. A private in Company I, Francis barlow was recommended for discharge due to a chronic disability. Apparently there was some problem at first with his discharge. According to Brennan, he remembered Barlow well “because Col. McConnell & Cap Weatherwax had quite a row about having him mustered out of service. It was claimed by the Col. That because of some informality about his muster in, he was not entitled to a discharge certificate.”

George returned to Michigan and on January 5, 1862, Lowing asked his brother-in-law for news of Weatherwax. “What is Captain Weatherwax doing? What does he say for leaving the service? We hear different reports of what he says.” It is not known what Bosworth’s reply was.

After his discharge George returned to Ottawa County, probably to his home in Georgetown. George married a second time to Mary A. Taylor Weatherwax, on June 17, 1870, at Bellevue, Eaton County; she was then living in Grandville, Kent County. (Mary was the widow of George’s brother Benjamin, who was a captain of Company E, Tenth Michigan Cavalry and who either died of disease or was killed in action in April of 1864.) Another brother Henry was elected sheriff of Ottawa County in 1869.

By the end of June, 1870 he was working as a farmer (he owned $5000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife Mary and two sons (Frank and perhaps Leon or Mary’s son Carl) in Georgetown; his father was also living with him as well. He was still living in Georgetown in 1872, farming in Georgetown in 1880, in 1882-83, and in 1884, when he was serving as Township supervisor.

George received pension (no. 1,127,100). George noted in a statement he gave on January 25, 1906 that his left breast was gone, but no particulars were discussed.

Sometime around 1884 he reportedly moved west and settled in Washington state, eventually settling in Aberdeen, Chehalis County. In fact, George probably lived the rest of his life in Aberdeen.

In late November of 1908 George broke his arm and subsequently died from “old age” on December 5, 1908, at his home 200 W. First Street in Aberdeen. George was buried in Fern Hill cemetery on December 7.

In 1909 his widow Mary applied for and received a pension (no. 839,313). She was still living in Aberdeen and residing at 104 E. Wishkah when she died in 1921.

Sunday, March 27, 2011

Edward Watson

Edward Watson was born in 1840, possibly in Michigan and possibly the son of Dustin (1811-1850) and Sarah (b. 1820).

In 1840 there was a Dustin Watson living in Martin, Allegan County, Michigan. He was probably the same Dustin Watson who purchased 40 acres of land at the Ionia land Office in Michigan in 1849. Vermont native Dustin Watson died of consumption in Ottawa County in March of 1850; that same year one Edmond Watson, age 6 was living with his mother (?) Pennsylvania native Sarah and older sister Michigan-born Helen with the Cissler brothers in Crockery, Ottawa County. (One of the brothers had been born in Pennsylvania.)

In any case, Edward (or “Edmon” or “Edmund”) was 21 years old and possibly living in Polkton, Ottawa County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.)

He was admitted to Union Hotel hospital in Washington, DC, on August 20, 1861, suffering from intermittent fever, and he died of paralysis of his left side on September 16, 1861, at the Union Hotel hospital. Edward was buried in the Military Asylum cemetery (Soldier's Home National cemetery).

In February of 1877 Edmund’s half-brother John B. Magers, applied for and received a “brother’s” pension (no. 244819).

Saturday, March 26, 2011

Stiles A. Watkins

Stiles A. Watkins was born on January 15, 1843, in Pomfret, Windsor County, Vermont, the son of Ransel (b. 12812) and Hannah (Hunt, b. 1816).

Vermont-native Ransel married Connecticut-born Hannah and they eventually settled in Vermont, although according to government records Silas’ parents were both born in Vermont and presumably married there.

In any case, Silas left Vermont, probably with his family and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan.

In 1850 there was one Lyman Watkins (b. 1818 in New York or Vermont) working as a carpenter with some $1000 worth of real estate and living with his wife New York native Sylvina (b. 1823) in Allegan village. In 1860 Lyman was listed as a wealthy druggist and living with his wife Sylvina in Allegan, Allegan County, and next door to Lyman lived Edward Wheelock who would join the Third Michigan in 1861.

Sometime between 1850 and 1860 Stiles’ father died and his mother married a wealthy farmer named William S. Hooker, presumably in Michigan and probably in Allegan County. (In 1850 Hooker, then living on a large farm in Allegan County, was married to Vermont native Mary (b. 1821) and they had one child, an infant girl Marcia.)

Stiles was probably the same ‘Silas A.” Watkins who was working as a farm laborer and living with William S. Hooker and his family in Leighton, Allegan County in 1860.

Silas stood 5’6’ with blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was a 19-year-old farm laborer possibly living in Leighton, Allegan County when he enlisted in Company F on August 14, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. He joined the Regiment on September 8 at Fairfax Seminary, Virginia, and was wounded by a gunshot on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia.

He was subsequently hospitalized and probably still absent wounded when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, where he was reported as transferred to the Veterans’ Reserve Corps as of September 16, 1863. (The VRC was made up of men who while ambulatory were generally incapable of performing regular military tasks due to having suffered debilitating wounds and/or diseases and were assigned to garrison the many supply depots, draft rendezvous, camps, forts, prisons, etc. scattered throughout the northern sities, thus freeing able-bodied men for regular military duty.)

Stiles was mustered out on July 19, 1865, from Company B, First VRC in Elmira, New York.

Stiles eventually returned to Michigan.

Stiles was married to New York native Delvina L. Cross (1841-1916), and they had at least six children: Alonzo (1868-1916), Emma (b. 1870), Ellen (b. 1873), Alexander (b. 1876), Cornelia (b. 1878) and Thomas C. (b. 1883).

By 1870 Stiles or Styles was working as a farmer (he owned $2000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and two children in Leighton, Allegan County, and they were still living on a farm in Leighton in 1880. He was living in Corning, Allegan County in 1888, and residing in Wayland or Leighton, Allegan County in 1890 and in Leighton, Allegan County in 1894. He was working as a a farmer and living with Delvina and three sons in Leighton in 1900. Near by lived Vermont-born Francis R. (b. 1845) and his family. Stiles was working as a a farmer and living with Delvina in Leighton in 1910; next door lived his son “Alle” and his family.

In 1878 he applied for and received a pension (no. 158229), for service in Compny F, Twenty-third Michigan infantry. This was most likely a typographical error and the reference should be to the Third Michigan infantry.

Stiles probably died a widower on July 21, 1923, in Wayland, and was buried in Hooker cemetery, Allegan County.

Friday, March 25, 2011

Arthur Watkins

Arthur Watkins was born on February 22, 1841, in Jordan, Onondaga County, New York, the son of Dennis (b. 1804) and Eliza (Birney, d. 1846).

Maryland native Dennis married Eliza, possibly in New York where they resided for some years. (In 1840 Dennis was probably living in Elbridge, Onondaga County, New York.) After Eliza died Dennis remarried New York native Adelia (b. 1816), probably in New York. In any case Dennis moved his family to Michigan, eventually settling in Bennington, Shiawassee County by 1850 when he was working a farm and Arthur and his siblings were attending school. By 1860 Arthur was living with his father and attending school with two of his younger sisters in Bennington. In fact Arthur lived in Shiawassee County, probably with his family, until the war broke out.

Arthur stood 5’10” with blue eyes, light hair and a light complexion and was a 20-year-old laborer possibly living in Shiawassee County when he enlisted at the age of 20 in Company G on May 13, 1861. By the first of August, 1861, Arthur was sick with a fever in the Regimental hospital, but he eventually returned to duty and was wounded slightly in the head (“left temple”) on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia. He was hospitalized briefly in Washington, DC, and by June 20 had returned to duty having recovered from his wound, “which,” wrote Homer Thayer of Company G, “proved not so bad as first supposed.”

According to one source, however, Arthur was back in the hospital by late summer and was not present with the regiment when it was engaged at the Battle of Groveton (Second Bull Run), Virginia, on August 29, 1862.

It is unclear whether Watkins actually returned to the Regiment since he was reported as absent sick through March of 1863. By May he was in the Brigade commissary department, and was wounded in the shoulder on May 3, 1863, at Chancellorsville, Virginia. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, but no credit for the enlistment is given in the records. He was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February. Arthur was apparently absent sick when he was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and he remained absent sick through July of 1864. He was mustered out July 5, 1865.

After the war Arthur eventually returned to Michigan, settling in Birmingham, Oakland County, where he married Michigan native Juliet Leonard (b. 1847) on December 1, 1866, and they had at least five children: Mabel (b. 1868), Mrs. Arthur Hill?), Harry L. (b. 1869), Myrta A., A. Grayce and Don D.

By 1870 Arthur was working as a farm laborer and living with his wife and two children in Bloomfield, Oakland County; also living with them was his father Dennis. Arthur eventually moved to Detroit, and was working on a Street car and living with his wife and children in on Twentieth Street in the Twelfth Ward. He remained in Detroit until about 1881 when he settled his family in Bellaire, Antrim County, where they ran a boarding house hotel which they had purchased from J. Cook. They engaged in that business for some twenty years.

Arthur was still living in Bellaire when became a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in December of 1894, was a Protestant and he received pension no. 388,894, drawing $12.00 per month in 1901.

According to one source, on “Christmas morning, 1900, Mr. Watkins was stricken with paralysis, and” as a result he was admitted to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 3587) on April 3, 1901.

Arthur had another stroke late in 1906 and he died of paralysis at the Home at 6:15 p.m. on June 16, 1907, and his body was sent to Bellaire where his wife had been living. His remains were taken to his home where the funeral was conducted under the auspices of the Masons. He was buried in Lakeview cemetery in Bellaire: lot 506, grave 1.

In July of 1907 his widow was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 633720).

Thursday, March 24, 2011

Thomas Jefferson Waters

Thomas Jefferson Waters was born in 1831 in White Lake, Sullivan County, New York, the son of David L. (b. 1804) and Clarinda (b. 1806).

New York natives David and clarinda were married before 1831, probably in New York. (In 1830 David was listed as livingin Bethel, Sullivan County, New York). Sometime between 1840 and 1842 the family left New york and settled in Michigan. By 1850 Thomas (listed as “Jefferson”) was working as a laborer and living with his family in Walker, Kent County. By September of 1852 Thomas had settled in Muskegon, Muskegon County residing there almost continuously until 1894 when he moved to Los Angeles, California. From 1852 to April of 1861 Thomas mostly drove wagons for Ryerson & Morris in Muskegon, although in 1860 he was also working as a log scaler and lumberman living in Muskegon at the Averill boarding house along with William Ryan and George Root, both of whom would enlist in Company H. (In 1860 his father David who had apparently remarried to Connecticut native Philena, was still living in Walker, Kent County.)

Thomas was 30 years old and living in Muskegon when he was elected Orderly Sergeant of the “Muskegon Rangers,” the company of volunteers raised in Muskegon in April of 1861 whose members would serve as the nucleus for Company H, and he subsequently enlisted as First or Orderly Sergeant in Company H on May 6, 1861. He was commissioned a Second Lieutenant on October 28, 1861, and according to Dan Crotty of Company F, he was wounded on May 31, 1862, at the battle of Fair Oaks, Virginia.

By mid-summer of 1862 Thomas was sick, possibly from his wounds, in Bellevue hospital in New York City. He was discharged from Bellevue on July 16, absent on leave from July 17, and eventually returned to the Regiment where he was promoted to First Lieutenant of Company E on August 12, commissioned August 5, replacing Lieutenant Solomon Tumy. Thomas was wounded slightly in one of his hands on August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, resulting in the loss of a finger, and by the second week of September was in Fairfax Street hospital in Alexandria, Virginia.

On October 28 Thomas was transferred back to Company H, He was still absent wounded and reported AWOL in November, although in fact he was at home probably on furlough recovering his health. In fact, while at home he married Pennsylvania native Mary Anne Sickles (b. 1843) on December 2, 1862; they had at least two children: Anna (b. 1865) and Frederick (b. 1867).

Thomas returned to the Regiment and was promoted to Captain of Company H on May 11, 1863, replacing Lieutenant William Ryan, and was commanding Company H by the first of September. He was reported on detached service recruiting in Michigan from February 18, 1864, through May, and was mustered out of service on June 20, 1864.

After his discharge from the army Thomas returned to Muskegon and worked for about ten years for the Muskegon Booming Company, driving piles for three years and then superintending the company’s business for six of those years. In 1870 he was working as an engineer (he owned $8000 worth of real estate) and living with his wife and two children In Muskegon’s Second Ward; he was still living in Muskegon in 1871 and in the 1870s he organized a tug line operating on Muskegon lake. He was commander of the tug Third Michigan in 1873 or 1874, working out of Muskegon. He worked for a while out of Michigan City, Indiana, and returned to the Muskegon area in September of 1877.

Thomas was elected sheriff of Muskegon on the Republican ticket in 1878, took office in January of 1879 and was sheriff during the “Ten Hours or No Sawdust” strike by the mill workers in 1882. In an interview he gave some years later Waters said “It was in the fall of 1878 I was elected sheriff of Muskegon County and I went into office January 9, 1879, and stepped out January 7, 1883. Of course I was elected on the Republican ticket. When I get so I can't vote the Republican ticket I won't vote. Yes, that was during the time of the big strike. It didn't bother me so much but a good many men were worked up. They felt bad because some one was going to kill me. But I am still alive.” By 1880 he was in fact working as the jailor and sheriff and living in Muskegon’s Second Ward with his wife and children.

He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, a “diehard” Republican and was reelected to office in November of 1880.

After his second term as sheriff was over in January of 1883, he again engaged in the shipping business on the Great Lakes. In June of 1879 he became a member of Grand Army of the Republic Kearny Post No. 7 in Muskegon.

In 1870 he testified for the prosecution in the second trial of George Vanderpool, formerly of Company H, who had been charged with murdering his business partner in Manistee. (Curiously, Thomas also testified in Vanderpool’s pension application, as well as for Calvin Curler, another former member of Company H.)

Thomas left Muskegon in 1883, when he was drawing $18.50 in 1883 (pension no. 121,628, dated February of 1873), sailing out of Manistee, Manistee County until 1886 and to Frankfort, Benzie County and up and down the western shore of Lake Michigan. In 1886 he sailed to Green Bay, Wisconsin and then to Saugatuck, Allegan County and Chicago in the fruit trade that fall. In 1887 he sailed out of South Haven, Van Buren County, and the following year sold the vessel and delivered her to Sandusky, Ohio.

It was probably in September of 1888 that Thomas joined the Grand Army of the Republic Henry Post No. 3 in Montague, and remained a member until he transferred his Grand Army of the Republic membership to Los Angeles sometime in 1898. In 1888 he built a new ship, the Mabel Bradshaw, and in 1889 she took her maiden voyage out of Holland, Ottawa County. He sailed her to St. Joseph, St. Joseph County in 1890 and from there for three years, making his last trip on November 5, 1893. He wintered at St. Joseph and sold the boat in May of 1894.

On June 18, 1894 he left for Los Angeles to live near his daughter and he arrived there on June 26, 1894. He returned to Michigan in 1901, but only on a brief visit before he returned to California, and he died in Los Angeles at 11:00 p..m. on June 14, 1906, and was presumably buried there.

His widow applied for and received a pension (no. 649502).

Wednesday, March 23, 2011

Willard Washburn

Willard Washburn was born in 1844, the son of Stephen.

Willard was 18 years old and had possibly just moved to Kent County from Ontario, Canada, when he enlisted in Company F on March 19, 1862, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered on April 30.

He was killed in action August 29, 1862, at Second Bull Run, and was presumably among the unknown soldiers whose remains were reinterred in Arlington National Cemetery.

In 1876 his father applied for a pension (no. 228779), but the certificate was never granted.

Tuesday, March 22, 2011

Archibald Washburn

Archibald Washburn was born on May 29, 1831, in Milton, Chittenden County, Vermont, possibly the son or grandson of Phineas (1788-1868) and Sylvia (Wright?).

New York native Phineas served the Fourth Regiment (Williams) of Vermont Militia in the War of 1812, probably along with his brother (?) Reuben. In any case, Phineas settled in Vermont and married Sylvia around 1810, possibly in Vermont where they resided for some years. In fact, Phineas was residing in Fairfax, Franklin County, Vermont in 1830, and in Milton, Vermont in 1840. Phineas reportedly married his second wife Vermonter Lucinda Godwin (b. 1804) in 1842 in Milton, Vermont, and they were still living in Milton in 1844. It appears that Phineas moved his family to Chateaugay County, New York sometime afterwards and by 1860 was still living in Chateaugay County (where he died in 1868 although his remains were sent for burial in Checkerberry cemetery, Milton, Vermont)

In any case, Archibald eventually left the family in New York and moved westward and by 1860 was a farm laborer living with a farmer by the name of Ephraim Rolf in Georgetown, Ottawa County.

He stood 5’7” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 29 years old and probably still living in Georgetown when he enlisted in Company I on May 13, 1861. (Company I was made up largely of men from Ottawa County, particularly from the eastern side of the County.) Archibald was suffering from typhoid fever when he was admitted to the Union Hotel hospital in Georgetown, DC on August 16, 1861 (he may have been transferred to another hospital on September 13, 1861). In any case, Archibald returned to the Regiment in September or October of 1861, and was apparently charged with two counts of desertion: on December 22, 1861, and on February 22, 1862 (both were removed in 1887).

In fact, he had been furloughed on December 19, 1861, and Lieutenant Stephen Lowing of Company I, wrote home in the first week of January to his brother-in-law that “I sent Mr. Washburn to your place. I presume you have seen him before this and he has told you all the news.” Furthermore, Archibald remained absent sick, apparently in Michigan and probably in Detroit, from January 19, 1862, to July 2, 1862, when he was sent to his Regiment from the Detroit Barracks.

He never made it to Virginia, however. He was admitted to Emory hospital in Washington, DC, on August 25, 1862, suffering from gastritis, and was returned to duty on September 13, 1862. He eventually recovered, and returned to duty and was wounded on November 20, 1863, at Mine Run, Virginia. He reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Solon, Kent County, was presumably absent on veteran’s furlough in January of 1864, and probably returned to the Regiment on or about the first of February.

Archibald was shot in the neck on June 2 during the action at Cold Harbor, Virginia, and was probably absent wounded when he was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864. Indeed he remained absent sick through July. He eventually returned to duty and was taken prisoner on October 27, 1864, probably at Boydton Plank road, near Petersburg, Virginia. He was initially confined at Richmond, Virginia on October 28, and sent to Salisbury, North Carolina on November 4. He was paroled on March 1, 1865, at N.E. Ferry, North Carolina, and sent to Camp Chase, Ohio on March 14, where he reported on March 18.

He apparently returned to western Michigan while awaiting his discharge, for he was examined by Dr. James Grove, former surgeon of the Old Third, on April 21, 1865, who certified that Washburn was suffering from pneumonia. Although Archibald probably remained in Michigan, he was mustered out (on paper) on June 19, 1865, at Camp Chase.

After the war Archibald remained in Michigan, and eventually settled in Ferris, Montcalm County. In fact, according to the History of Montcalm County, Archibald was one a a large group of men who in 1869 petitioned for a detachment of Ferris Township, in order to create Richland Township.

He married his first wife Ohio native Elizabeth Freeze or Evans Johnson (1826-1902) on August 18, 1873 or 1875, in Richland, Montcalm County, and for many years worked as a farmer. By 1880 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Ferris, Montcalm County. He was living in Elm Hall, Gratiot County in 1883 when he was drawing $4.00 for a wounded neck (pension no. 154,744, dated August of 1878), and which was increased to $12.00 by 1905. He was still living in Elm Hall by 1888, but by 1890 was residing in Ferris (and 1894), in Grand Rapids from 1905-06 and in Moline, Allegan County from 1906-11.

Archibald was admitted as a widower to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 4511) on June 2, 1905, and was probably still a resident of the Home when he married his second wife, Dency Rochelle West Ayres Bisbee (1835-1926) on December 23, 1905, in Grand Rapids. He was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and a Protestant. For reasons unknown he was dropped from the Home on February 23, 1906.

He died of “senility” at 11:15 p.m. on February 27, 1915, in Moline, and was reportedly buried in Vestaburg, Montcalm County.

In March of 1915 his widow applied for a pension (no. 1043302), but the certificate was never granted.

Monday, March 21, 2011

George R. Warren

George R. Warren was born in 1837, in Michigan, the son of Chancellor (b. 1810) and Laura A. (b. 1820).

New York native Chancellor married Connecticut- or Ohio-born Laura and moved to Michigan sometime before 1837. By 1850 Chancellor was working as a blacksmith and living with his wife and children in Ann Arbor, Washtenaw County where George and his siblings were attending school. Chancellor eventually moved his family to the western side of the state and by 1860 he was working a farm in Grattan, Kent County.

George was living in Grattan, Kent County, Michigan, when he married Emily McDonald on November 11, 1860, probably in Grattan; one of the witnesses was his father Chancellor.

In any case, George was 24 years old and probably living in Grattan (or perhaps in Grand Rapids) when he enlisted as Musician in Company A on May 13, 1861. He was wounded on July 2, 1863, at Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, possibly while the Regiment was engaged in the Peach Orchard. By early July he was a patient in the general hospital at West’s building in Baltimore, Maryland, and was apparently soon afterwards transferred to Satterlee hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He remained absent sick in the hospital until he was mustered out on June 20, 1864, at Detroit.

After his discharge from the army George probably returned to Michigan and very likely settled in Mecosta County. (In 1870 his widowed mother Laura was living in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward; several of her children were also residing with her.) In 1880 there was one George W. Warren, born c. 1842 in Michigan, working as a farmer and living with his wife Elie F. (b. 1841 in Michigan) and their 7-year-old son Raymond in Big Rapids, Mecosta County.

Although it is not known what became of his wife Emily, George remarried a second to one Julia A.

In 1870 George applied for and received a pension (no. 113004).

George probably died sometime around 1890, probably in Mecosta County.

In October of 1890 his widow was living in Big Rapids, Mecosta County, when she applied for and received a pension (no. 314319).

Sunday, March 20, 2011

Charles S. Warren

Charles S. Warren was born in 1844, possibly in Prussia.

Charles stood 5’6” with blue eyes, light hair and a fair complexion and was an 18-year-old farmer probably living in Kent County, Michigan, when he enlisted in Company H on December 29, 1862, at Paris, Kent County or Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day at Detroit. He joined the Regiment on January 22, 1863 at Camp Pitcher, Virginia, and was sick in the hospital in July. He was transferred, possibly as a Musician, to Company A, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Charles eventually returned to Michigan after the war.

He was married to Mary L. (d. 1926) and they had at least one child: Amy.

He was probably the same Charles Warren who was working in a paint (or pail) factory and living in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward in 1870. For some years he worked as a laborer. By 1890 he was living in Denver, Newaygo County. In any case he settled in Battle Creek, Calhoun County where he was probably living in 1914.

Charles was admitted on April 30, 1914 to the Michigan Soldiers’ Home (no. 6645) in Grand Rapids and became a member of the Home Fife and Drum Corps. (His daughter Amy Koopman was living at 15 Indiana Avenue SW in Grand Rapids in 1914.)

In 1890 he applied for and received a pension (no. 741198).

Charles died on September 1, 1917, in Grand Rapids, Kent County, and was buried in the Michigan Soldier’s Home in Kent County: block 6, row 4, grave 23.

His widow was living in Michigan, probably at the Home, in September of 1917 when she applied for and received a pension (no. 847056). Mary, too, was buried in the Home cemetery alongside her husband.

Saturday, March 19, 2011

Highland Shaw Warner

Highland Shaw Warner was born in 1835 in Cattaraugus County, New York, or perhaps in 1833 in Ohio, the son of James (1811-1855) and Sarah (Shaw or James, 1812-1869). (The 1860 census lists New York as Highland’s birthplace and his age as 24, whereas the 1850 census lists his age as 17 and his birthplace as Ohio.)

Highland’s father was born in Vermont and his mother was born in Massachusetts and they were married in either New York or Vermont in 1834. (James was the grandson of Col. Seth Warner of Vermont.) In any case, the family eventually settled in New York or perhaps in Ohio where they resided for some years but by the mid-1840s had moved to Michigan. By 1850 James had settled his family on a farm in Algoma, Kent County where Highland worked as a laborer and resided with his parents. In 1860 Highland was working as a farmer living with his mother on the family farm in Algoma. Next door lived the Hamblin brothers, three of whom would serve in the Third Michigan during the war – and who would all die during the war. On the other side of the Hamblins lived Henry Magoon and his parents; Henry too would serve in the Third Michigan.

Highland stood 5’10” with brown eyes and hair and a light complexion, and was 25 years old and probably still living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company C on May 13, 1861. (His younger sister Mary was married to Andrew Myers who would join Company F later in the War; Andrew’s older brother Peter joined Company C, probably with Highland.)

He was present for duty with the regiment during the Pensinsula campaign in Virginia in the spring and summer of 1862. From camp near Fair Oaks, Virginia, he wrote on June 17, to his mother then living in Sparta, Kent County.

I have just received this afternoon another letter from you dated June 10th. I received one a few days ago & answered it yesterday; it was dated June 2nd. It is evening now & I am writing by candlelight in my little tent. I don’t know as I can write much tonight, but I thought I would try & write a little so that you might know that I am all right yet. My health is first rate now & I enjoy myself pretty well considering all the circumstances. We have a great deal of rain here this Spring which makes it quite unpleasant some of the time & rather bad for the movement of the army; we have not had any more regular battle since the last of May & first of June that our regiment or brigade has been in, but we are preparing for it every day, but how soon the great decisive battle will be I don’t know; but perhaps the day is not far distant when we will march triumphantly into Richmond the Confederate Capitol; when it is taken I think the rebels will have to give up & the rebellion crushed forever, as Richmond is their only hope of salvation now; but we expect that they will fight desperately to save their capitol; but if the lose that they might as well give up the ghost for the U.S.troops have got every other place of importance in our possession now; we have the whole length of the Miss. River & pretty much of the whole of the Atlantic coast.

I suppose you have heard about all the news before this time by the papers of the particulars of the battle that we was in here at Fair Oaks, or Seven Pines as it is sometimes called. I don’t know as I wrote much about it in my last letters, so I will write a little about it in this.

Well the battle began about noon the 31st of May & Gen. Casey’s division was camped at the front and was attacked first by the rebels with overwhelming numbers & was driven back out of their camp with great loss. Our regiment & brigade was lying back about a mile & we was sent in after the rebels had got possession of Gen. Casey’s camps & the ground this side; then our regt., the 3rd, was ordered up double quick to meet the enemy in front.

The rebels had then got possession of a piece of woods & slashings & was concealed from our view until we had got within ten rods of them when they opened a deadly volley of musketry upon us & we had to form our line of battle under a tremendous fire from the enemy & a great many of our men fell before our line was formed which was done in a hurry & then we poured in the deadly volleys into them. Although they had the advantage of us by being formed in the woods & slashing & getting the first fire, but soon we gave them all they wanted. It was said by some prisoners that we took that our regt. (the 3rd) stood the firing of a whole brigade of the enemy five regts. strong for nearly an hour when the 5th [Michigan] regt & 2nd Mich. & NY 37th [the rest of the brigade] come up to help us, the rest of our brigade. But our regt had got the rebels started back on the retreat before any aid came to our relief, and when the rest of this brigade come up we made the rebels fly what did not lay down to bite the dust. Our brigade drove the rebels clear back beyond Gen. Casey’s camps.

Morning, 18th

I will give you a description of our regt. & brigade & division so that you will understand when I speak of it or how situated. The commanding generals have changed since we was on the upper Potomac. Our brigade is under the command of Gen. Berry; that is the 2nd, 3rd & 5th Mich & NY 37th regts which form our brigade, called Berry’s brigade, and this brigade is in Gen. Kearney’s division; a division is formed of several brigades. Now when you hear of Kearney’s division & Berry’s brigade a doing anything in battle you may consider that the 3rd is doing their part. This brigade has won a great name in the fight of the late battle on account of their gallant bravery manifested in the great battle.

The first of June the enemy renewed the attack and Generals Richardson’s & Sumner’s divisions repulsed them & drove them back covering the ground with their dead. It is reported that the enemy attacked us with about eight thousand and was whipped by four or five of small divisions of McClellan’s army. There was a rebel general taken prisoner, said that there was men enough started from Richmond to eat up all the forces that we had this side of the Chickihominy River; he was asked why they did not do it; but said he, the devil himself could not do it. He said he never saw men fight so desperately as we did. He said that the Mich. men was perfect tigers.

I can’t write any more this time for the mail is ready to go out now.

Highland was reported sick in the hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania from December 14, 1862 (when he was dropped from the company rolls at Camp Pitcher) through January of 1863, and in fact he probably remained absent in the hospital until he was discharged on May 25, 1863, at West’s building hospital in Baltimore, Maryland, for arthrosia (degenerative affliction of a joint), following seven months of hospitalization.

His problem was serious indeed and would grow worse with each passing year. Highland returned to his home in Kent County, and was living in Sparta, Kent County by late June of 1863 when he was examined for his pension application by Dr. E. R. Ellis of Grand Rapids. Dr. Ellis wrote in his report that “Applicant is unable to walk without the aid of one or two canes or crutches. The rheumatic trouble is confined mostly to his knee and wrist joints. He also has a bad cough. . . .” Highland lived the rest of his life in Algoma Township, Kent County.

Highland married Michigan native Mary Smith (b. 1848) on October 12, 1864, probably in Kent County, and they had at least ten children: Carrie (b. 1865), Darius or Dan (b. 1867), James R. (b. 1870), John A. (b. 1871), Highland S. (1873-74), Andrew B. (1874-1876), Willard O. (b. 1877), Gilbert S. (1880), Blanch G. (1881) and Chauncy Henry (b. 1883).

In late 1869 he was again examined, this time by Dr. G. K. Johnson in Grand Rapids. Dr. Johnson wrote on December 20 that “At present the left arm and the left leg are considerably wasted and weakened. The left wrist joint is nearly stiff and the fingers of that hand are partly stiffened and weakened. The left knee is swollen, painful and stiffened. The limb is contracted or bent so that a crutch is necessary in walking. The disability is ‘equivalent to the loss of a hand or foot’ and it is probable that it will be permanent.”

In 1873 Warner was examined by former Third Michigan Regimental Surgeon, Dr. Zenas Bliss. Now serving on the pension board, Bliss wrote in his examination report that Warner was “suffering from chronic rheumatism involving several joints -- particularly the left knee joint which is almost completely anchylosed. Also both wrist joints -- which are considerably stiffened from the disease. Suffers from pain in the several joints.”

He was still living in Sparta in 1874 when he was again examined by Dr. Bliss, who wrote in his annual examination report that Warner’s rheumatism involved “nearly all the joints of the body” and that the “Tissues about both shoulders, ankle and hip joints, [were] considerably thickened.” Bliss also noted that Warner was now much emaciated.

He was living in Sparta when his pension was increased to $24.00 in May of 1874, and on September 25, 1874, Dr. E. J. Emmons testified that he had been treating Warner for some time and that he was “suffering intensely, with his joints all stiffened and so completely helpless that he cannot even raise his hand to his head or feed himself, or even turn over in bed. I believe that his condition is chronic and lasting. He requires the constant care and attention of another person and I believe he will continue to require such attention.” It was also noted that from the “progressive changes in the tissues”

Highland was unable to perform any labor whatsoever and as the disease progressed he was increasingly unable to take care of himself. Indeed, the pension examining board wrote in March of 1875 that Warner was “unable to dress himself, get up from bed, sit down in chair, without help. Unable to get either hand to mouth without help. Requires the constant presence of an attendant. From existing structural changes at all joints, we think his condition will never greatly improve. His present condition is not at all caused or influenced by vicious habits.” That same year his pension was increased to $50.00. per month.

By 1877, the board noted, he required constant attendance as he was entirely helpless. “Partial anchylosis of shoulders, hips, knees, ankles and neck -- also of phalangeal joints.” Following his 1880 annual examination, the board wrote that Warner was “moderately well nourished. Muscles flabby. All joints more or less anchylosed. No motion at wrist -- slight in fingers and elbow -- moderate at shoulders. Unable to carry hands near mouth -- in fact arms are useless for all ordinary purposes. Joints of lower extremities all more or less anchylosed, rendering him unable to move with crutches.”

By 1880 Highland was working as a farmer and living with his wife and children in Algoma, Kent County. In 1883 and 1884 Highland was living in Six Corners, Ottawa County, and probably in Ravenna, Muskegon County in 1885. His arthrosia continued to worsen as the years went by, and his “rheumatism” was, in the words of one doctor, the worse case he had ever seen. His attending physician, Dr. F. D. Smith of Coopersville, Ottawa County, testified on August 29, 1885, that “the soldier’s rheumatism affected both heart and lungs and was the immediate cause of his death. Was the worst case affiant ever saw. Soldier was totally helpless, nearly every joint in his body was affected and some of them anchylosed, and that his habits were good and temperate.”

Highland was a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association, and he received pension no. 19,769, dated November of 1863, drawing $8.00 in 1863, $15.00 in 1870, $18.00 in 1872, and $72.00 in 1883.

He died in Ravenna, Muskegon County on July 14, 1885, of rheumatism and was buried in Myers cemetery in Sparta.

His widow applied for and received pension no. 217,616.

His widow Mary married a William Smith on December 9, 1885, and was living in Fremont, Newaygo County in 1886. In any case, a pension application was filed and granted on behalf of a minor child (no. 237258).

Highland’s remarried widow was probably living in Conklin, Ottawa County in 1890.

Friday, March 18, 2011

George W. Warner Sr.

George W. Warner Sr. was born in 1816 in Greenbush, Windsor County, Vermont.

(His service records noted his place of birth as Greenbush, New Hampshire; however, there is no Greenbush, NH. The 1850 census for Ada, Kent County, Michigan lists his place of birth as Vermont. This discrepancy between the two records would perhaps indicate that he was born very close to the line dividing the two states. Alternatively he was possibly born in Greensboro, Orleans County, Vermont In 1850 there was a G. W. Warner (35 years old) living in Troy, Orleans County, Vermont; a George S. Warner (31 years old) a merchant living in Burlington, Chittenden County, Vermont along with his wife Harriet and young son Henry (7 months old); and a George W. Warner (12 years old, born in Massachusetts) living in Halifax, Windham County, Vermont, with two elderly women by the name of Pratt.)

George was married to Vermont native Electa A. (b. 1818), probably in Vermont, and they had at least four children: George W. Jr. (b. 1841), Julia (b. 1843), Edgar (b. 1846) and Carrie (b. 1855).

George moved his family from Vermont to Michigan sometime after 1846, and by 1850 they had settled in Ada, Kent County where George worked as a shoemaker. By 1860 he was working as a shoemaker and living with his wife and children in Plainfield, Kent County. (He was possibly related to Highland Warner of Algoma, Kent County, whose father James was also born in Vermont; Highland would serve in Company C, Third Michigan.)

George Sr. stood 5’8” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was 44 years old and residing in Kent County when he enlisted in Company B on May 13, 1861. (His son George Jr. would enlist in company M, Sixth Michigan cavalry the following year. George Jr. survived the war and returned to his home in Plainfield. He was married to Mary and was probably the same George Warner listed as living in Plainfield in 1890 and 1894. He received a pension (no. 374084). George Jr. died in 1898, probably in Kent County. In any case, it appears he is buried in the Soldiers’ Home cemetery in Grand Rapids township.)

George Sr. was discharged for a varicocele on the left side “of nine years’ standing” on July 29, 1861, at Arlington Heights, Virginia.

George eventually returned to his home in Michigan after he left the army, probably to Plainfield. By 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife in Austerlitz, Plainfield Township, Kent County.

George died in early 1880.

In June of 1880 Electa (listed as “mother”) was living with her daughter Carrie and her husband Frank Whitney and their family in Ensley, Newaygo County. Electa applied for a pension in March of 1880 (no. 261044) but the certificate was never granted.

Thursday, March 17, 2011

Elijah Warner

Elijah Warner was born in 1840 in New York.

Elijah left New York and had settled in western Michigan by the time war had broken out.

He stood 6’1” with blue eyes, brown hair and a light complexion and was a 21-year-old teamster possibly living in Kent County when he enlisted in Company F on May 13, 1861. He was reported working in the Brigade bakery in May of 1863, and “absent in the hands of civil authorities” in August, apparently under arrest, possibly in New York City.

Third Corps, at 10:25 a.m. on August 7, charged with “misbehavior before the enemy.” Specifically, it was alleged by Captain Thomas Tate of the Third Michgian “that he . . . did while his Regiment was supporting a battery on the 3rd day of May 1863 [at Chancellorsville, Virginia] in the face of the enemy, disgracefully run away and remained absent until the evening of May 4th 1863.” Elijah pled not guilty.

The prosecution then called Sergeant James Van Dusen of Company F.

Judge Advocate: State what you know in reference to his running away from his regiment at the time specified.

Answer: We were laying in line of battle b y Brigade, supporting batteries. I saw the accused when we halted to lay down. I did not see him after we did lay down. We were ordered to make a charge and when we made the charge I am confident he was not there. The next time I saw him was about the middle of the next day. When he returned and reported to his regiment.

Judge Advocate: Is he a regularly enlisted and mustered man?

Answer: Yes sir.

Judge Advocate: Was your regiment engaged with the enemy during his absence?

Answer: Not after that charge.

Judge Advocate: Were you engaged with the enemy while the accused was with his company?

Answer: I do not think we were. . . .

Judge Advocate: How did he behave in the charge of Saturday night?

Answer: He behaved well as far as I know.

Court: Was the regiment in the same place when he returned as it was when he left?

Answer: No sir.

Court: Was the regiment under fire when he returned?

Answer: No, all was quiet at the time he returned.

Judge Advocate: Was the regiment under fire of artillery during the time he was absent?

Answer: yes sir, it was under heavy artillery fire.

Court: Have you ever known him to misbehave himself before the enemy?

Answer: No sir I have not.

Prisoner: What was my conduct before the enemy at Gettysburg and Wapping Heights?

Answer: It was very good, he behaved himself very well.

Court: Do you know whether the accused disgracefully ran away at the time specified.

Answer: I do not.

The witness was dismissed and Sergeant Harvey Briggs of Company F was then called by the prosecution.

Judge Advocate: Do you know, of your own knowledge, that the accused ran away from his Regiment when supporting a battery on the 3rd of May?

Answer: I know that he did run away.

Judge Advocate: state what you know in reference to his running away.

Answer: I know that he asked the Captain’s permission to leave the ranks to get some water. I do not think the Captain gave him permission, for I heard the Captain say that he could not let any man leave the ranks, but that some of the men would give him some water. In about ten minutes from that time I saw him get up and leave the Company, and was going back towards the rear. I spoke to him and told him not to leave the ranks but he made no reply. I think he must have heard me, for he was rising up and picking his gun up at the time I spoke. The next time I saw him was in the afternoon of the next day.

Judge Advocate: Have you seen the accused receive pay of the U.S. Goverment?

Answer: Yes I have.

Court: Was the Regiment under a heavey fire at the time the accused left the ranks?

Answer: Yes. We were under a heavy artillery fire.

Prisoner: What has been my conduct in battle at Gettysburg and Wapping Heights?

Answer: His conduct was noticed as being remarkably good at both engagements. I noticed it myself, he behaved well.

The witness was dismissed and Captain Thomas Tate commanding Company F was then called as a witness for the defense.

Prisoner: What has been my conduct at the battle of Gettsburg, Wapping Heights and since?

Answer: His conduct since the battle of Chancellorsville and in both the engagements named has been unexceptionable.

The witness was then dismissed. Elijah then submitted the following statement to the Court:

I had [had] no water since the afternoon of the day before. The men in the company had so little that they could not spare me any. When we halted and lay down, I asked the Captain to let me get some, and he replied he would pretty soon, or some such answer. We lay there some 15 minutes, and I was suffering for a drink of water, and supposing I should have time to get some from a creek not more than a half dozen rods, I went to get some, and the Regiment was gone when I returned. I was not gone more than 10 or 15 minutes. I looked for them, and could not find them, but later in the forenoon I found a squad of the Regiment (which I joined) with the Adjutant. And remained with them till we went to the river and stacked arms. (The Adjutant is now in Michigan.) I then went to the creek close by, washed my feet and stockings, and I looked nearly all night for my Regiment, and in the forenoon of the next day found it, and joined my company.

Elijah was found guilty to both the charge and specification and sentenced to forfeit two month’s pay and to do fatigue duty with a log and chain. However, on August 8 Major General David Birney, commanding the First division, ordered that “The accused having shown that since the alleged & proven misbehavior that he has endeavored to regain his character as a good soldier by gallantry at Gettysburg, the sentence is remitted and the accused be returned to duty.”

He was reported a deserter on September 19 in New York City, and returned to the Regiment on October 11, 1863.

Elijah reenlisted on December 24, 1863, at Brandy Station, Virginia, crediting Bowne, Kent County, was presumably absent on 30 days’ veteran’s furlough in January of 1864 but apparently failed to return to the Regiment and was reported AWOL in February. He soon rejoined the Regiment and was transferred to Company F, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

Elijah may have returned to Michigan (or he may have been living in Dayton, Ohio) when he was admitted to the Central Branch National Military Home in Dayton, Ohio, on September 13, 1871.

No pension seems to be available.

Elijah died on November 22, 1871, at the Home in Dayton, and was buried in Dayton National Cemetery: section A, row 11, grave 41.

Wednesday, March 16, 2011

David Warner

David Warner was born on September 20, 1827, in Lindorf, Kircheim, Wurtemberg, Germany.

David emigrated from Germany to the United States and eventually settled in Illinois.

He was married to Wurtemberg immigrant Cecilia Standenmeier (b. 1829), in Chicago, Illinois, and they had at least five children: Barbara (b. 1855), Katie (b. 1857 and diedin infancy), Mary (b. 1858), twins Louisa and Alice (b. 1860, Louise died in 1912), and William (b. 1863).

They were living in Illinois by 1855 (when Barbara was born), and then moved to Michigan between 1855 and 1859 (when Mary was born). By 1860 David was working as a carpenter living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward.

David had blue eyes, dark hair and a fair complexion and was 33 years old and living in Kent County, probably Grand Rapids, when he enlisted as a Musician Second Class in the Band on June 10, 1861. He was discharged from the Band on August 13, 1862, at Harrison’s’ Landing, Virginia, “as a member of the Band not as a musician.”

By 1870 he was working as a carpenter in Grand Rapids’ Fifth Ward and living with his wife and children. David and Cecilia were still living in Grand Rapids, on Gold Street, with their children in 1880. He was living in Grand Rapids in 1888, working as a carpenter and living at 55 Gold Street in 1889 and 1890 and at 257 Gold Street in 1912.

In August of 1887 David was probably living in Michigan when he applied for and received a pension (no. 393650). David was reported as a member of the Old Third Michigan Infantry Association in June of 1911.

David was a widower when he died on May 2, 1920, in Grand Rapids and was buried alongside his wife in Greenwood cemetery, section F, lot 30.

Tuesday, March 15, 2011

Lemuel J. Ward

Lemuel J. Ward was born on June 11, 1839 in Onondaga County, New York.

Lemuel left New York and moved west, eventually settling in Michigan sometime before the war broke out.

He stood 6’1” with blue eyes, dark hair and a dark complexion and was a 21-year-old farmer possibly living in Ionia County when he enlisted in Company E on May 13, 1861. (He was possibly related to Henry Clay Ward of Company A; both were born in Onondaga County, New York.)

Lemuel was shot in the left wrist, left hip and left leg on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and subsequently hospitalized on June 8. By early July he was reported hospitalized in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, probably first at Buttonwood Street hospital but by July 26 he was a patient in the Fifth Street hospital in Philadelphia, where he was listed as “severely wounded in arm, hips and legs at Fair Oaks” but “doing well.” Although he was listed as missing in action as of early September, in fact he was discharged for his wounds on September 24, 1862, at Fifth Street hospital.

After his discharge from the army Lemuel returned to Michigan and on July 3, 1865, married New York native Sarah M. Fish (b. 1848) in Portland, Ionia County. They had at least nine children: Ernest (b. 1866), Byron (b. 1869), Henry B. (b. 1872), Silas E. (b. 1874), Ira (b. 1878), Charles (b. 1881), Wellington (b. 1882), William (1884) and Mabel (b. 1888).

By 1866 Lemuel was living in Lyons, Ionia County and by 1870 he was working as a farmer and living with his wife and two children in Muir, Ionia County. He probably lived in Muir until he moved to Adams County, Nebraska sometime in the mid-1870s. In any case, he eventually returned to Michigan and by 1880 he was working in a saw mill and living with his wife and children in Ferrysburg, Ottawa County. By 1888 he was living in Nunica, Ottawa County, where he may very well have lived the remainder of his life.

He received pension no. 23,456, dated 1866, drawing $8.00, increased to $15.00, to $18.00 in 1872, and $24.00 per month by 1912.

Lemuel died in Nunica on September 6, 1912, and was buried in Nunica cemetery.

In 1912 his widow applied for and received pension no. 765317.

Monday, March 14, 2011

Henry Clay Ward

Henry Clay Ward was born in 1842 in Onondaga County, New York, the son of Horatio G. (b. 1812) and Alvira or Elmira (b. 1822) .

Massachussetts native Horatio married New Yorker Alvira, probably in New York, and by 1850 Horatio was working as a carpenter and living with his wife and two children in Geddes, Onondaga County, New York where Henry C. attended school. By 1860 Horatio and presumably his family, were living on a farm in Ada, Kent County.

Henry stood 5’9” with hazel eyes, black hair and a dark complexion and was a 19-year-old farmer probably living in Ada or perhaps in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A, on February 26, 182, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, and was mustered the same day. (He was possibly related to Lemuel of Company E; both of whom were born in Onondaga County, New York.) Henry was sent to Detroit where he awaited transportation to Virginia and to the Third Michigan infantry. On March 8, he wrote home to “dear father and mother.”

I take the pen in hand to try and see if I write. We got to Detroit Tuesday night a little after dark and marched a mile and a half to the barracks. We have good barracks here. We have not got our uniform et nor have not drilled any yet. We marched down town yesterday to be inspected. There was not any of us thrown out. About going to Jackson I cannot tell for certain yet. I asked the captain yesterday and he said he could not let me go this week, but that he would before we go away. He thinks we shall stay here 3 or 4 weeks. But I guess we shall go when we are ordered. The other gang had just gone to Washington the day before we got here. I hope we shall not stay here a great while unless we drill. I wrote a letter to Huldah [his sister?] Wednesday, the next morning after we got here. The man that carries the mail done to the office said he carried down some mail for a boy to his mother by the name of Henry and he went with the gang that went Monday. I don’t know who it can be. We have not any of us had a chance to get down town yet but I guess we shall get a chance to go after we get our uniform. We have not any of us been on guard yet but shall have to be tomorrow I guess. There is about eighty or 90 men in the [barracks?] now in all. There are 2 barracks here that are used and two that are not done yet and five or 6 others building. We have not done any thing yet but chop a little wood and lay around. We shall send our clothes home as soon as we get our uniforms and can get a chance to get down and look around some before we go away. There is so much noise I cannot think of any more to write this scribbling. We were all glad we were not thrown out. I enjoy myself here first rate and I guess the others do too. This is all. I will [not] try to write any more this time I guess.

We are all well and enjoy ourselves good. Give my respects to all the neighbors and receive this from your affectionate son, Henry C. Ward.

PS In directing letters here you can direct them to Detroit Detroit Barracks Mich 3 Mich Infantry. Write soon

Four days later, March 12, he wrote his sister Huldah from Detroit.

Dear Sister,

I take my pen in hand to see what I can write. I received your letter this morning and was glad to hear that you were all well and that you was enjoying yourself and that you arrived safe home. I also received a letter from Christopher and will try and answer it if I get time. I cannot find out exactly when we shall go from here but I guess it will be tomorrow or next day. The officers will not tell when the barracks are getting [orders and] some [hope] to leave. I was in hopes that I could come out and see you all but shall not be able to go if we go as soon as that. I asked the Captain and he said he would let me have a pass to go before we went from here. He said then we should stay here 3 or 4 weeks and I thought I should get a chance to come. I am sorry it is so for I should like to have come first rate but it can’t be helped now. I had 4 pictures taken, one in a good-sized case and one in a small case and two without cases. I expected to have some taken here in my uniform but could not get a chance to get down town. They have not given many passes. George and William got a pass this morning while I was on guard and I was too late or I would [have] went down and had my pictures taken today and sent to you. If we do not go before Friday I may get a chance yet. I have written home twice but have not received an answer yet. I wrote home soon after I got here and then I found out that we were going sooner than I expected and I wrote another when I sent my clothes. William received a letter from John’s folks is all we have heard from home but shall probably have some before we go from here. We shall all of us be ready to go anytime. We have not drilled any to speak of since we have been here and it is rather dry business. There was some more men come from the Rapids last night but not any that we know. Our Regiment is on the move. I do not know whether we shall go to the Regiment or not. We have got our uniform; our overcoats are a dark blue and our pants are a dark blue and we have caps.

I want [?] to have my pictures taken to Washington if we ever get there and send them back to you.

I cannot think of any more this time. There is a good deal of noise here and I guess I may as well stop this scribbling for this time and try and better it next time so please excuse this from your affectionate brother. You can do as you are a mind to about writing to me. If you write here I guess the letters will follow. I shall write again as soon as I get to a stopping place so as you can tell where to direct your letters. I shall be glad to hear from all of you as often as you can find time to write. Tell George to write and I will try to write to him. This is all I think of now so good by from your brother Henry C. Ward.

PS I got George’s letter last night and glad to hear from you all. I was going to answer Cs letter today but I do not know as I shall have time for we got our orders last night that we go tonight and I shall have to be getting my things ready for a start tonight. I shall write as we get to a stopping place. I cannot write any more today for I have got to go on guard again so I will stop scribbling and receive this from your brother Henry C. Ward.

Henry was soon shipped to Virginia and by March 25, he was at Fortress Monroe, when he wrote to his father and mother back in Michigan.

Dear Father and Mother,

I sit down to write you a few lines to let you know how I am getting along. I am feeling very well this morning. Perhaps you may think that I am in a hurry to write but I do not know how long it [we] shall stay here and I did not know as I should get a chance to send one as well after we move from here which I think will be before a great while. Some say in about 10 days. I think as soon as the troops all get here. There is between 75 and 100 thousand between here and the fort most of which will probably move together. We do not know where as this is all kept secret. I do not know as this letter will go any farther than the fort till after this expedition is over but I will write it and it may go farther. If not you will probably get it some time. Have you received the letter I wrote you on the boat after I started from Washington? We were two days and two nights coming to the fort. We saw Mount Vernon from the boat; it is a very handsome place. We saw some of the rebels’ earthworks but they had all left. The fortress is a nice thing and can be held very easily. The Union gun is there them that has seen it says it is a nice gun. We were encamped in the first place about 2 miles from the fort. Yesterday we moved about 2 miles farther. The village of Hampton lies close to our camp most of which the rebels burned before they left. It must have been a pleasant place. It was built mostly of brick. The ruins look bad.

I received a letter from Huldah before I left Detroit which I answered before I left there. I wrote to her again. I also received one from George and one from Chris which I have not answered yet but shall as soon as I get time. There were 8 or 10 runaway negroes come into camp this morning. I believe they come from Richmond. The rebel pickets are not a great ways from here. Some of the boys around say they saw some of them. Father spoke about my being vaccinated. We have not any of us been yet. I waited for the rest of the boys and we kept putting it off and we went from Detroit before we expected to, some of the others that came with us were vaccinated in Detroit and their arms were sore. It bothered them to carry their knapsack and they caught cold which makes it very bad so I do not hardly know whether it is best to have it done [it]. We had ought to have had it done before we left home and it would have [been] well by this time.

We have not got our tents so it is not quite so good getting along as it would be if we had them. I like soldiering full as well as I expected I should. We have been on the move so it has not been quite so well for us as though we were camped. The rest of the boys [are] well. Emery Moon is having the ague a little and I heard that our colonel was sick. In directing letters to me you can direct them Co. A 3rd Regt. Mich Inf Washington DC. That is the way Mr. Moon [Wilbur or Emery] has directed and I guess they will follow as they know there where our Regiment is. I have not been around camp much since we moved this time. When we were at the other camp I went down to the water and got a few fresh oysters to eat. The negroes got the[m] and open them and sell them for 25 cents a quart. It is very pleasant country through here but I think it will show the effects of the war a great while. The fences are all pulled down and used for wood and the shade trees which are cedars are all cut down to get the boughs for beds. I found a good many boys here that I was acquainted with. You must excuse this scribbling with a lead pencil as I had no pen and ink handy and if you can not read it just throw it in the fire so I will stop as I think I have wrote enough so please receive this from your affectionate son Henry C. Ward.

I will write the directions again as you may not make it out in the other place it is Co A 3rd Regt Mich Inft Washington DC

Write soon and do not wait and I will write as often as I can think of anything to write so good by

Mr. Moon just said 3 men from the New York 38[th] were just taken prisoner by the rebels. They were out about 100 yards after some wood and some cavalry come on and took them.

By April 13 Henry was still with the regiment when it was in a camp in the woods near Yorktown, Virginia, and he took the opportunity to write home to his family.

Dear father and mother,

I received your letter today and as I had a few leisure moments to spare I thought I would write you a few lines to let you know how I was getting along. I don’t know but some of the boys when they wrote and said that I was sick. There was a few days before we moved from Hampton that I was not very well and on the march I was not very well but I did not have to carry my knapsack so I got along very well but I had enough to carry. It was the first day we went very slow stopping every few moments but the next day we went fast enough to make it all up. We started from Hampton Friday the 4[th] and got to our camping ground Saturday night and stayed there till Thursday when we moved back a mile or so in the woods as we were in sight of the rebels and they could all our moves and we were in range of their guns. We have a good place here for a camp all but the water which is not very good. We have not seen any thing of the rebels yet although we have been called out twice. The first time we were called up about 12 o’clock at night and stood in the ranks a little while and hearing nothing we went back to bed and have not heard anything else till day before yesterday the long roll beat and we were out in a hurry and went out and back 2 times and then we got our supper and went to sleep and that is the last we have heard. I expect there will be a move made here before a great while when the artillery all gets here and when Gen. McClellan gets things ready. I think if he does not manage this thing right he will not stand as high as a military man as he does now. And I think if the rebels get whipped here it will about use them up in their part. I saw the Gen. As we [were] on the march. He is a young man and a smart-looking man. You wrote that John Sumner was sick he has been with the brigade since we landed at the fortress and I guess he is well now. I received a letter from Austin last night and have answered it today. They were all well there when he wrote. I also received one from Huldah and one from Chris with another from Huldah enclosed. I think I will answer Huldah’s as she said she was going home before long. My letters all come in a heap. There is others that I promised to write to and I guess they think I am not going to write to them. Tell Mr. Daniels folks that I will try and write to them as soon as I can get time. I do not know how much time I shall have now. Tell them to write and not wait for me and I will write the first chance I get. We have a balloon here that has been up several times to look over on to the rebels and the rebels had a balloon up today. Enclosed you will find 2 secesh cards that I got out of a secesh house where Moon and I went after some milk. He got quite a number. The rest of the boys send their respects. John is waiting for a letter from some one. William has been to the hospital 2 or three days but is back here again. George is well with the exception of a cold. I guess after a little we shall get used to it. William wrote to John’s folks a few days ago and I wrote a little in it. . . . If you can read this you can do better than I think you can. If not you must throw it in the stove. Receive this from your affectionate son, Henry C. Ward. Write soon

He also wrote to his sister Huldah the same day, April 13.

Dear sister,

I received your letter today and also one from Chris with one from you enclosed saying that if I answered it I should direct it there. I also received one from home saying that they were all well and I got one from Austin last night both of which I had answered and I though that I would answer yours while the fit is on. I expect it will make me sick but I guess I shall have to risk it. Tell Chris and George that I will answer theirs the first chance I get. We have not drilled any since we came from Hampton [Virginia]. There is no chance here in the woods. You wanted to know what arms I had. I have nothing but a gun. I also have a cartridge [box] and a haversack and a knapsack, which makes all I want to carry. There was a few days before we left Hampton that I was not very well and I got some medicine and I am now feeling very well. On the march the wagon carried my knapsack also Mr. Moon’s and we went to a secesh house and got some milk to drink and it tasted good. We also got a few cards. I have sent two home and I will send you one and I guess I will send one to Austin. We were two days on the road. The first day we stopped every little while but the next day we went fast enough to make it all up. The mud was very deep in some places so deep and sticky that I had to stop once or twice and get hold of my boot straps as I should have lost my boots sure. We got here Saturday night and were in sight of the rebels. We lay there a few days but we were in range of their guns and they could see all our moves so we moved about a mile or so back in the woods. We have a very good place for a camp, plenty of wood but the water is not very good. I do [not] use any more water than I can help. We have not had any fighting yet but we have been called out twice but it did not amount to anything. The first time we were called up about midnight and stood around a little while and then went back to our tents and went to sleep. The next time we were called out in the afternoon and double-quicked out of the woods twice and then come back just as we were all getting savage and eat our supper and then went to sleep and that is the last we have heard from them. I heard cannon today in the direction of the Fortress. Things that we boys buy here are rather dear; eggs are only 40 cents a doz and butter 35, cheese 25, sugar 25 so a person cannot afford to a great deal. I have about 2 dollars left.

We have not had any pay yet. . . . I was in hopes I should get some so as to send that to you but if I can not get it I shall have to stand it. This is all this time. Give my respects to the rest of the rest of the folks and tell them to write.

On May 6 from a camp in the field Henry wrote home to his family.

Dear father and mother and sister,

As I had a few moments to spare I thought I would write you a few lines to let you know how I am getting along. We are getting along rather fast just now. We started from our camp Sunday afternoon and have marched pretty fast chasing the rebels. They left Yorktown Sunday and retreated leaving their forts and quite a number of tents and a good many cannon. And our men have been after them ever since. Last night there was a fight and quite a fight it was. There was a good many men lost on both sides. Our regiment went out to support a battery and did not happen to get into a fight. I did not go out for I got rather tired but today am feeling first rate. Today the rebels have left a very strong place at Yorktown and I think they must begin to think that their cause is rather hopeless. And this morning they have left the place where the fight was last night and there is a large force of cavalry and infantry after them. We have marched a few miles and I guess we shall stay here for the night and then will probably march after them.

I received Huldah’s letter yesterday while we were on the march. It rained all day yesterday and the mud in some places was almost knee-deep which made it hard marching. I shall have to write a short letter this time and in an awful hurry so you must excuse the writing. I rather think if we have good success here I think the war will soon be to an end. It has been said in camp that Richmond was taken but one cannot tell anything about what you hear. But I hope it is so. Will write you again as soon as I can get a chance and answer the questions then. So receive this from your son and brother. Henry C. Ward. Write soon.

On May 18 from Cumberland Landing Henry wrote home to his family.

Dear Father and mother and sister,

I received your letter today and was glad to hear from you all and as I had time to spare I thought I would answer it. I received a letter from Huldah the day we were on the road to Williamsburg and answered it the next day but I had to write it in such a hurry if you could make it out you would do better than I expected you would. I have had another from Austin which I answered about the fight at Yorktown. There was not much fight about it but they gave us a good chase through the mud to Williamsburg where they gave our side a pretty good fight but we were a little too much for them. It was a hard fight. They were in a slashing and our men had to come out in plain sight. You have heard as much about the number of men lost on both sides as we have here for all we know about it we get from the papers. I know there were a great many dead lying on the field when we came over it the next day. The next day early in the morning they left and we are after them slow. Most of the troops are ahead of us and we have been lying here 2 days at the landing. And I expect the next move we make we shall go about 10miles which will be near where the rebels have made another stand but if they do not stand better there than they did at Yorktown we shall have some more chasing to do. I have seen a good many prisoners and deserters and they look rather hard. The rebels had a very strong place at Yorktown and it would have cost a good many lives to have taken it. They also had some strong forts at Williamsburg. The rebels must have had a hard road to retreat on for some of their wagons were left in the mud up to the hub. The inhabitants along the road said that they were badly scattered when they retreated and even goes to show that they were somewhat in a hurry. I hope they will make a stand this side of Richmond so we shall have to go any farther south. We have seen a good many hundred acres of wheat up about knee high but it was not quite so high when our troops had all gone over it for it made very good pasture for cattle and horses and I saw corn up about 4 inches. All I have seen of Virginia so far I like first rate and I should like a farm here. Most of it lies very level and is good soil. I have not received Clark’s letter yet but you can tell him I will write to him before long if I can get a chance. For the last 2 weeks I have not had time to write anybody unless I had to hurry pretty fast. I can not tell how long we shall stay here but I will write again when we get into another camp. I have not received any pay yet nor do I know when I shall. It was said last pay day that we should be paid again the 15th but it has not come yet. I borrowed 3 dollars of Wilber [Moon] and I guess that will last me till we get some. I shall send all I can spare home and I think I had better send it by express. It will cost about 75 cents but I think it will be in the best way. When you write tell me what you think about it. I suppose it will have to be sent to the Rapids.

And from a camp in the woods on May 29 Henry wrote home to his “dear mother father and mother.”

I received your letter last night . . . and was glad to hear that you were all well. I also received one from Mr. Daniels and one from Benj Colla [?] dated the 22nd which said that there had been a frost which had killed the fruit. We had not had any letters in a number of days as we were on the move. We are in about 12 miles of Richmond. W are not allowed to write anything about the war so I will not have anything to say about it. We have a nice place here in the woods for a camp but cannot tell how long we stay for a soldier never knows when he has to travel nor how far he has to go. About the warm weather here we have not had many warm days here yet although we feel the heat when we are on the march for out clothes are rather thick. But we do not have any too many when night comes. The most of our regiment have sent their knapsacks back to the rear and all I carry now is 1 blanket and one half of a shelter tent and an oil cloth and provisions which makes about enough to carry my portfolio and change of clothes were in my knapsack and I sent it in such a hurry that I did not keep any of them out. But I guess I shall get it again if not I do not care much. I am feeling the best now that I have felt since I enlisted with the exception of the headache which bothers me some but I have got used to it so I do not mind it much unless it is hot and we are marching. If we get our pay pretty soon I shally get a hat which I think will be better than a cap. About sending me money you need not do it for I have some left yet. I borrowed 2 dollars of Mr. Moon and I think we shall have our pay before long. The rest of the boys are all well but John. He went to the hospital this morning. He was not able to march but I think he will be around in a little while. Our division genera’s name is Kearney, our brigade general is Berry and the Colonel is Champlain. About sending papers; they would come but you need not send any unless it comes handy. Tell mr. Daniels folks that I will answer their letter soon. About the war being over I think it will last a while yet although if our army has good success here I think it will end it in Virginia. What success did Pa have in getting that money for Uncle George? He has never said anything about it. Tell him he must not work too hard to get sick. I am writing this in my lap on a sack of hard crackers so you must excuse this. About sending stamps you need not unless you have a plenty for I have enough to last me quite a while. I hope we shall be home in time to get some _____ give my respects to all. I do not care about coming back till I see the thing through I am well good by [please excuse the] poor writing and receive this from your brother and affectionate son Henry C. Ward.

Henry was killed in action on May 31, 1862, at Fair Oaks, Virginia, and presumably among the unknown soldiers buried at Seven Pines National Cemetery.

His parents were living on a farm in Ada, Kent County in 1870 (his father owned $2000 worth of real estate). In 1886 his mother Almira was living in Michigan when she applied for and received a pension (no. 230331). In 1888 Horatio was living in Michigan when he applied for and received a pension (nos. 372338 and 247556 respectively).

Sunday, March 13, 2011

Henry Ward

Henry Ward was born in 1842 in North Annes (?), New Jersey.

In 1860 there was a 17-year-old fruit shop clerk named Henry Ward living with his New Jersey-born family, father Gilbert S. Ward (b. 1817), a fruit shop owner, and mother Eliza J. (b. 1820) and their other children in Newark’s Fourth Ward, Essex County, New Jersey. In any case, Henry left New Jersey and came to Michigan sometime before early 1863.

He stood 5’4” with hazel eyes, black eyes, and a dark complexion and was a 21-year-old bar-tender possibly living in Lenox, Macomb County when he became a substitute for William T. Kirkham, who had been drafted on February 17, 1863, for 9 months at Lenox. Henry subsequently enlisted in Unassigned on March 4, 1863, at Lenox for 3 years, and was sent to the Regiment on March 6, 1863.

There is no further record. No pension seems to be available.

In 1870 there was one Henry Ward living in Ray, Macomb County.

Saturday, March 12, 2011

Francis Ledoit Ward

Francis Ledoit Ward was born on January 9, 1843, in Orange, Franklin County, Massachusetts, the son of Edward Francis (1818-1896) and Harriet (Stratton, 1822-1854).

Massachusetts natives and first cousins Edward Francis and Harriet were married in 1842 in Athol, Worcester County, Massachusetts. They settled in Orange, where Edward’s family lived and where he worked as a lumberman and furniture manufacturer. In 1850 Francis or “Frank” (known as “Ledoit”) was attending school and living with his family in Orange. Harriet died in 1854 in Orange and in 1857 Edward remarried Orange, Massachusetts native Tryphenia C. Harrington (b. 1835 or 1840) in Orange. The family soon moved west, settling in Grand Rapids, Kent County, Michigan by the spring of 1858. Frank’s father worked as a furniture manufacturer. By 1860 Frank was an apprentice sash-maker apprenticed to Warren Rindge, a harness-maker in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward.

He was 18 years old and probably living in Grand Rapids when he enlisted in Company A on May 13, 1861. At some point Frank was transferred to the Band, and discharged on August 13, 1862, at Harrison’s Landing “as a member of the Band and not as a musician.”

In any case, after he left the army Frank eventually returned to Grand Rapids.

He married Michigan native Etta M. Robinson (1844-1917), on January 9, 1865, in Greenville, Montcalm County and they had at least five children: Winifred (b. 1867), Arthur (b. 1868), Lula (b. 1872), Frank (b. 1878) and Orin (b,. 1880).

They soon settled in Grand Rapids (all of his children were reportedly born there). In 1870 his father (who owned $14,000 worth of real estate) and stepmother were living in Grand Rapids’ Second Ward. In any case, Frank reportedly worked for some years as a music teacher in Grand Rapids, and by 1880 Frank was working as a music teacher and living with his wife and children in Grand Rapids’ Seventh Ward. (His parents were living in the Fourth Ward.) Frank probably lived the rest of his life in Grand Rapids.

Frank died of “throat trouble” on November 27, 1881, in Grand Rapids, and was buried in Greenwood cemetery, section E, lot 21. According to both the cemetery burial records the DAR transcriptions online. The DAR also reports that buried with Frank is his wife (?) Etta and a son (?) Arthur (1868-1917).

In April of 1890 his widow was living in Grand Rapids when she applied for and received a pension (no. 280579).

Friday, March 11, 2011

Rodney Wampole

Rodney Wampole was born on July 30, 1843, in Livingston County, New York, the son of John (b. 1804) and Elizabeth (b. 1814). (The 1920 census lists his birth place as Canada and the online burial record for Washington State veterans’ homes lists his birthplace as Ontario, Canada.)

Pennsylvania native John married New York-born Elizabeth sometime before 1833 probably in New York where their daughter Matilda was born. The family resided in New York for many years and by 1850 Rodney was living on the family farm in West Sparta, Livingston County, New York.

Rodney was possibly the same Rodney Wampole who was 19 years old when he enlisted as a private on May 15, 1863 at Rochester, New York, in Battery L, Fourth New York Heavy Artillery and who reportedly deserted on June 21, 1863.

In any case, Rodney left New York and by late 1863 had settled in western Michigan.

He stood 5’11” with hazel eyes, brown hair and a fair complexion and was a 19-year-old farmer possibly living in Spring Lake, Ottawa County when he enlisted in Company C on December 30, 1863, at Grand Rapids for 3 years, crediting Spring Lake, and was mustered the same day. It seems that Rodney may have spent little if any time with the Third Michigan. He joined the Regiment on February 18, 1864, at Camp Bullock, Virginia and was absent in the hospital in March.

He was transferred to Company I, Fifth Michigan infantry upon consolidation of the Third and Fifth Michigan Regiments on June 10, 1864, and was reported absent sick in September and October. He returned to duty on December 3, 1864, from Beverly hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and was mustered out on July 5, 1865, at Jeffersonville, Indiana.

After the war Rodney eventually returned to Ottawa County and was married to Eleanor Ackley (d. 1898) in 1866. (Eleanor was the widow of Hezekiah Ackley who had died while serving in the Fifth Michigan cavalry during the war. Roderick Ackley, another former member of Company I who was also from Ottawa County before the war had also served in the Fifth Michigan cavalry. Hezekiah was probably his brother or cousin. In any case, Eleanor received a widow’s pension (no. 27695). After she married Rodney she applied for a minor child’s pension (no. 10686).)

By 1880 he was working in a grist mill and living with his wife in Coopersville, Ottawa County. He resided for some time in Polkton, Ottawa County after the war, and by 1888 he was living in Sullivan, Muskegon County. He was probably the same civil war veteran named “Reuben” Wampole who was living in Coopersville, Ottawa County in 1894.

In 1889 Rodney applied for and received a pension (no. 883492).

Rodney married his second wife Mary E. (1866-1927) in March of 1900 in Illinois. Rodney left Michigan and moved to Washington State around 1901. In 1920 Rodney was living with his wife Mary in Orting, Washington state. (They were probably living at the Soldiers’ Home in Orting.) Rodney was admitted to the Veterans’ Home on January 9, 1923 where his wife died in 1927.

Rodney died either at the Washington State Soldier’s Home in Retsil or in Seattle on May 30, 1935, and was presumably buried in the Home cemetery (as is Mary).